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Paramount Room: Bring Your Wallet

Paramount Room: Bring Your Wallet
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  • Paramount Room: Bring Your Wallet

    Post #1 - December 7th, 2007, 3:01 pm
    Post #1 - December 7th, 2007, 3:01 pm Post #1 - December 7th, 2007, 3:01 pm
    Behold the place that specializes in beer! (I don't want to call it a brewpub, or a gastropub, as the former term doesn't apply, and the latter is eschewed by everyone.) As the wine bar trend appears to be slowing, a new animal has emerged in Chicago on the tails of the success of Hopleaf, a beloved beer pub and food destination. Two new beer-focused places have recently opened on the West Side, Paramount Room and Bluebird (discussed here.). Not content to be like the Map Room, where the choice of beer is endless but food must be ordered and delivered, these places teeter on the gastropub side by offering menus elevated in creativity above the Amer-Irish pub fare of chicken wings and burgers.

    Apart from decent beer selection, the connecting thread between Bluebird and Paramount Room is their collective indifference to food, in my opinion. Whereas Bluebird's offerings vacillate between the too expensive and the downright reasonable, Paramount is expensive, period. Bring your wallets, folks.

    The menu contains a good deal of trendy junk food. Beer battered fried pickle spears were fine and nothing to write home about, but were priced at $7 - for four spears. Yep, that's $1.75 per spear. Keep in mind that they are, after all, pickles. Even though shockingly gauche junk food is somewhat trendy right now, $7 is highway robbery. Apparently, overpriced junk food is the culinary trendmakers' way of selling the feeling of giving the finger to the world through food.

    More on this subject - a single scotch egg is $9. The egg seemed like a micro-egg; tiny with hardly any white -- very odd as it should be hard-boiled -- but then I read the menu which claims that it's poached first (which perhaps accounts for its teeny size). In any case, $9 was too much to pay for the fleeting rebellious feeling of consuming an egg that is wrapped in sausage and panko before being fried. (By the way, The Gage's scotch egg was heads and shoulders better than this one.)

    There is a small menu of interesting looking sandwiches, including a croque madame (which is a very civilized sandwich for a menu focused on naughty junk food) [$10], and a "Wagu[sic] Kobe" burger with the very trendy and rebellious fried egg option ($9). Paramount Room is following the trend set by more upscale restaurants and steakhouses of making you pay extra for sides, except even most steakhouses provide fries gratis (or included in the price) with burgers. The major problem with doing this is that Paramount Room is not an upscale restaurant or steakhouse, and this attempt at an upcharge is just tacky. There should be a law in this country that burgers come with fries. At Paramount Room, you have to pay an extra $3 for fries, making their burger creep up to $12 in price. Those are Rosebud Steakhouse prices.

    What is that, you say? "But Rosebud's burger isn't "Wagu[sic] Kobe" beef. To that I say - WHO CARES. There was nothing about this burger that had you converting to "Wagyu Kobe" beef for life. In fact, the small size means that after four bites, you're done, and out $9. (For those who have lunched at May Street Market, the burger is sized similarly.)

    While everything tasted fine, much more satisfying than Bluebird, I got the distinct sense that the investors here were continually reaching into my pocket. Service was ditzy, but genuinely warm and well-meaning. The room is cozy and fun, with a steady stream of neighborhood folk coming in and out. The Dyson (TM) hand dryers in the bathroom are worth the trip for a beer alone.

    Beer selection was not huge, but varied. Wine selection is fine. Cocktails are creative, although too weak.

    Paramount Room
    415 Milwaukee Ave
    Chicago
    (312) 829-6300

    Edited to fix typos.
    Last edited by aschie30 on December 7th, 2007, 3:14 pm, edited 2 times in total.
  • Post #2 - December 7th, 2007, 3:10 pm
    Post #2 - December 7th, 2007, 3:10 pm Post #2 - December 7th, 2007, 3:10 pm
    Thanks for the report. A friend and I stopped in last Friday evenng, found the place nearly empty, and decided to head to Avec instead.
  • Post #3 - December 7th, 2007, 3:35 pm
    Post #3 - December 7th, 2007, 3:35 pm Post #3 - December 7th, 2007, 3:35 pm
    Beer battered fried pickle spears were fine and nothing to write home about, but were priced at $7 - for four spears. Yep, that's $1.75 per spear. Keep in mind that they are, after all, pickles. Even though shockingly gauche junk food is somewhat trendy right now, $7 is highway robbery. Apparently, overpriced junk food is the culinary trendmakers' way of selling the feeling of giving the finger to the world through food.


    Maybe in some way it is like lighting a cigarette with money was in an earlier time - it says you are wild, having fun, and have money to burn. More likely, though, it is based on the proven marketing approach that says people perceive value based on the price as opposed to anything else. If they priced the pickles at $3 people would sneer at them, but at $7 they think, "these must be special!"

    Thanks for the report, now I can avoid the place. :)
    d
    Feeling (south) loopy
  • Post #4 - December 8th, 2007, 8:59 am
    Post #4 - December 8th, 2007, 8:59 am Post #4 - December 8th, 2007, 8:59 am
    It is now PARAMOUNT that I avoid this place at all COSTS, thanks for the heads up. $9 for ONE small scotch egg is the most ludicrous thing I've ever heard...are they trying to pass it off as some sort of delicacy just because you don't see it on a lot of menus?
  • Post #5 - December 8th, 2007, 9:32 am
    Post #5 - December 8th, 2007, 9:32 am Post #5 - December 8th, 2007, 9:32 am
    I like trying to read Tony's comment in William Shatner's voice and think Big Bill would agree about the egg. I do as well.
  • Post #6 - December 10th, 2007, 4:00 pm
    Post #6 - December 10th, 2007, 4:00 pm Post #6 - December 10th, 2007, 4:00 pm
    I have been meaning to try this place out, as I pass it almost daily on my way to work, and it's the same ownership (or something like that) of the people at Volo up in Roscoe Village. I'm a beer guy, most definitely, and will try some here but I'm reluctant to shell out big bucks for meager bar snacks...

    oh, and Dyson hand dryers are the friggin' bomb!
    - Mark

    Homer: Are you saying you're never going to eat any animal again? What about bacon? Ham? Pork chops?
    Lisa: Dad, those all come from the same animal.
    Homer: Heh heh heh. Ooh, yeah, right, Lisa. A wonderful, magical animal.
  • Post #7 - December 11th, 2007, 4:52 pm
    Post #7 - December 11th, 2007, 4:52 pm Post #7 - December 11th, 2007, 4:52 pm
    Two friends and I hit Paramount the other night and it was decent. We started with the the beet and goat cheese salad - which was outstanding - and the tempura green beans, which didn't pair that well with the chile sauce, IMHO.

    I went all out and had the pork shank, which was in a nice sauce, but not as tender as I hoped. The lack of sides with a $17 entree was annoying in hindsight. One friend had the Kobe burger, which she enjoyed, but I found underseared and nowhere near the league of a Kuma burger. My other friend has the fish and chips which were just fish and chips from what I tasted.

    Overall, I like the gastropub trend, as I like being able to get a pint of Three Floyd's and some decent food for $20, but I won't be in a hurry to go back.

    On a related note, can anyone tell me what the story is with Kobe showing up on every bar menu lately? In general I haven't been impressed with what I've had so am I correct in assuming that they're serving a low grade of genuine Kobe beef? Or is U.S. raised beef somehow being passed off as Kobe now?

    JohnnyConatus
  • Post #8 - December 11th, 2007, 5:01 pm
    Post #8 - December 11th, 2007, 5:01 pm Post #8 - December 11th, 2007, 5:01 pm
    JohnnyConatus wrote:On a related note, can anyone tell me what the story is with Kobe showing up on every bar menu lately? In general I haven't been impressed with what I've had so am I correct in assuming that they're serving a low grade of genuine Kobe beef? Or is U.S. raised beef somehow being passed off as Kobe now?


    The latter.

    Wagyu is the cattle. Kobe is the prefecture in Japan from which the beef raised there takes its name. Kobe is the big name for generally producing excellent beef, but like Champagne, if it isn't from the place it isn't the genuine article. The word has been rendered meaningless by American producers selling inferior Wagyu (or Wagyu crossbreeds) as Kobe. But the quality was always independent of the name. There is some excellent American Wagyu that isn't Kobe, and there is plenty of Japanese Wagyu (Mishima, Matsusaka, etc.) from other regions that may not be Kobe but is every bit as good if not better than typical Kobe. The word Kobe used to indicate that you were getting premium beef, but now it's just a buzzword, sadly.
    Dominic Armato
    Dining Critic
    The Arizona Republic and azcentral.com
  • Post #9 - December 11th, 2007, 5:09 pm
    Post #9 - December 11th, 2007, 5:09 pm Post #9 - December 11th, 2007, 5:09 pm
    JohnnyConatus wrote:Two friends and I hit Paramount the other night and it was decent. We started with the the beet and goat cheese salad - which was outstanding - and the tempura green beans, which didn't pair that well with the chile sauce, IMHO.

    I went all out and had the pork shank, which was in a nice sauce, but not as tender as I hoped. The lack of sides with a $17 entree was annoying in hindsight. One friend had the Kobe burger, which she enjoyed, but I found underseared and nowhere near the league of a Kuma burger. My other friend has the fish and chips which were just fish and chips from what I tasted.

    Overall, I like the gastropub trend, as I like being able to get a pint of Three Floyd's and some decent food for $20, but I won't be in a hurry to go back.

    On a related note, can anyone tell me what the story is with Kobe showing up on every bar menu lately? In general I haven't been impressed with what I've had so am I correct in assuming that they're serving a low grade of genuine Kobe beef? Or is U.S. raised beef somehow being passed off as Kobe now?

    JohnnyConatus


    And the Wagyu (um..."Kobe") burger trend is just now trickling down to every Johnny-come-lately(much the way you still see chipotle mayo being trotted out everywhere as if it hasn't been around as a meaningless concept for many years now). I date the "kobe" burger trend to three or four years ago with the move to oneupsmanship among high end burger/steakhouses
    "Johnny thought when all purpose had been forgotten the world would end this way, with a dance. He slumped back in a corner, drew his knees up to his chin, and watched."-Derek Jarman
  • Post #10 - December 12th, 2007, 10:38 am
    Post #10 - December 12th, 2007, 10:38 am Post #10 - December 12th, 2007, 10:38 am
    Granted, I've never had a Kobe/Wagyu steak or burger so I don't really know what I'm missing, but does it even make sense to grind up such premium beef for a burger? Correct me if I'm wrong, but don't you lose benefits like better marbling and texture when it's ground up? Are you left only with a "beefier" taste?

    I don't know if this is an apt comparison, but I've rarely had much success making burgers with sirloin -- I'm better off using chuck since a better cut of beef won't necessarily result in a better burger.
  • Post #11 - December 12th, 2007, 12:06 pm
    Post #11 - December 12th, 2007, 12:06 pm Post #11 - December 12th, 2007, 12:06 pm
    I like Paramount Room quite a bit. It's all too rare, imo, to find a comfortable pub-like setting with serious food served by super friendly people. That's what Paramount provides, and at prices that are quite reasonable, with a few previously noted overpriced exceptions.

    Last night I had a delicious, crisp-skinned roasted chicken with fingerling potatoes and applewood smoked bacon for 14 bucks. 14 bucks for a generous 1/2 chicken that was moist and perfectly roasted is close to a steal in this town. This was easily big enough for two to share, and combined with a side of creamed spinach, a delicious and healthy squash/ shrimp bisque and a bottle of Marcel Deiss Pinot Gris on half price wine night, this excellent dinner for 2 came to 58 bucks.
  • Post #12 - December 12th, 2007, 12:38 pm
    Post #12 - December 12th, 2007, 12:38 pm Post #12 - December 12th, 2007, 12:38 pm
    danimalarkey wrote:Granted, I've never had a Kobe/Wagyu steak or burger so I don't really know what I'm missing, but does it even make sense to grind up such premium beef for a burger? Correct me if I'm wrong, but don't you lose benefits like better marbling and texture when it's ground up? Are you left only with a "beefier" taste?

    I don't know if this is an apt comparison, but I've rarely had much success making burgers with sirloin -- I'm better off using chuck since a better cut of beef won't necessarily result in a better burger.


    Anecdotally: I haven't noticed any discernible, consistent difference in "Kobe" burgers that I've had. I really have a hard time believing that Rockit and Park Grill are really sourcing and grinding up Wagyu cattle for cheeseburgers. I can't prove that they aren't, but if they are, it's not worth it.
  • Post #13 - December 12th, 2007, 12:59 pm
    Post #13 - December 12th, 2007, 12:59 pm Post #13 - December 12th, 2007, 12:59 pm
    wagyu beef has the tough cuts and trimmings like any other carcass, but i'm just guessing.
    i used to milk cows
  • Post #14 - December 12th, 2007, 1:07 pm
    Post #14 - December 12th, 2007, 1:07 pm Post #14 - December 12th, 2007, 1:07 pm
    danimalarkey wrote:Granted, I've never had a Kobe/Wagyu steak or burger so I don't really know what I'm missing, but does it even make sense to grind up such premium beef for a burger? Correct me if I'm wrong, but don't you lose benefits like better marbling and texture when it's ground up? Are you left only with a "beefier" taste?

    I don't know if this is an apt comparison, but I've rarely had much success making burgers with sirloin -- I'm better off using chuck since a better cut of beef won't necessarily result in a better burger.


    I'm sure ndgbucktown's experience is in large part because any mangy steer with a Wagyu seven generations back in the bloodline is now being called Kobe, even if every other indication is that he's Angus. My experience is similar. I've had a few "Kobe" burgers. Good beef, all, quite tasty, but no relation whatsoever to the premium grades of Japanese beef. I've never seen an offering that was made with premium beef, but I don't see how it could cost less than $50, and probably more. You WOULD know the difference, but I'm not so sure that would be a good thing when it comes to burgers, as you suggest.

    Steak, on the other hand... it's like a completely different animal. Do partake if you have the opportunity :-)
    Dominic Armato
    Dining Critic
    The Arizona Republic and azcentral.com
  • Post #15 - December 12th, 2007, 7:37 pm
    Post #15 - December 12th, 2007, 7:37 pm Post #15 - December 12th, 2007, 7:37 pm
    Right, steak and sausages (including hamburger) are very different. With a sausage/burger, you can precisely control the amount of fat in the mix. With a steak, you can't.

    So, for steaks, you want as much intramuscular fat as possible, and wagyu/kobe give you that. For a burger, you're looking for a sweet spot probably in the 73-85% lean range, and you can get that with whatever type of meat you want.

    Now, granted, the actual meat itself might taste different from angus vs wagyu vs piedmontese vs dairy cow vs select vs choice vs prime, but the main benefit of wagyu is lost. And I doubt, once the truffled mayo and fontina and such are added, that you'd be able to detect it at all.
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #16 - December 14th, 2007, 5:03 pm
    Post #16 - December 14th, 2007, 5:03 pm Post #16 - December 14th, 2007, 5:03 pm
    I don't think The Paramount Room is anything unusual or anything to avoid as far as prices. I have started stopping in this place on a regular basis, after they opened it right in my way, as I walk to the train station, and have yet to feel like anything wasn't worth the price. I've been blown away by some of the dishes, and since it's open late-night, I've seen many a Chef (including from Avec) thoroughly enjoying the food there.

    If you feel this is just bar food at high prices, I see your point, but I don't see (most of the menu items) as just bar food.

    The cheapest Scotch Egg I've seen in town is at Goose Island at 7 bucks, The Gage's Egg is only a little bigger than Paramount's, but is still 9 bucks. I liked Paramount Rooms egg better than the Gage's, the sausage is much more flavorful:

    Image

    I've seen it temporarily on some menus, like at Celtic Knot for 7-8 bucks. How much is Duke of Perth's?

    A nine dollar burger without fries is a crime, but this quality of burger is 16 bucks at The Gage, 18 bucks at Park Grill etc, etc in places that aren't particularly upscale. I'd pay the 10 bucks Kuma's charges for a burger even if it didn't have fries and certainly have no problem paying 9 for Parmount's:

    Image

    That said, you won't find me spending 7 bucks on a pickle (sliced in fourths). I'll be spending my 6.35 on the La Chouffe and Kasteel Brune they have on tap, or my favorite, the Left Hand Milk Stout.

    Maybe they just had to charge the pickle and fries mark-up to pay for that hand-dryer. It is impressive.
  • Post #17 - December 15th, 2007, 11:44 am
    Post #17 - December 15th, 2007, 11:44 am Post #17 - December 15th, 2007, 11:44 am
    "a delicious and healthy squash/ shrimp bisque"...

    Kennyz, I never thought I'd read the words "healthy" and "bisque" used in the same sentence. :lol: Whether it was truly healthy or not, it sounds f'n delicious.

    kiplog, thanks for the pics. I would pay $9 for that burger without fries included, it looks like it was made with effort and care.

    Is it just me, or does the sausage in the Scotch egg look pretty undercooked? This doesn't surprise me...the couple times I've made Scotch eggs at home (had to pan fry them) I've noticed that it's tough to cook the sausage through without burning the outside a little. I guess I should try cooking them sober and see if they turn out better next time.
  • Post #18 - December 15th, 2007, 12:20 pm
    Post #18 - December 15th, 2007, 12:20 pm Post #18 - December 15th, 2007, 12:20 pm
    Kennyz, I never thought I'd read the words "healthy" and "bisque" used in the same sentence. Whether it was truly healthy or not, it sounds f'n delicious.


    I know what you mean. "Healthy," is certainly a relative term. In this case, the bisque was made from what tasted very much like shrimp stock and pureed squash, with perhaps just a touch of cream added to finish. This is opposed to many bisques - against which I have nothing - that add a lot of cream to create a smoother, silkier texture and richer flavor.
  • Post #19 - December 15th, 2007, 1:13 pm
    Post #19 - December 15th, 2007, 1:13 pm Post #19 - December 15th, 2007, 1:13 pm
    How much is Duke of Perth's[scotch egg]?


    Seeing how it has never ever been available on any of the many occasions I've tried to order it there, it's way too expensive.
    Anthony Bourdain on Barack Obama: "He's from Chicago, so he knows what good food is."
  • Post #20 - December 17th, 2007, 9:50 am
    Post #20 - December 17th, 2007, 9:50 am Post #20 - December 17th, 2007, 9:50 am
    Paramount Room is following the trend set by more upscale restaurants and steakhouses of making you pay extra for sides


    I don't think this is an accurate representation of Paramount's menu. While there are extra sides available for a charge, the main dishes at Paramount are not served a la carte as in most steakhouses. For example:
    - The amish chicken comes with roasted potatoes and wilted spinach.
    - The steak comes with crispy fried shallots.
    - The duck confit comes with a charcroute of cabbage and veal sausage.
  • Post #21 - December 18th, 2007, 9:27 pm
    Post #21 - December 18th, 2007, 9:27 pm Post #21 - December 18th, 2007, 9:27 pm
    Kennyz wrote:
    Paramount Room is following the trend set by more upscale restaurants and steakhouses of making you pay extra for sides


    I don't think this is an accurate representation of Paramount's menu. While there are extra sides available for a charge, the main dishes at Paramount are not served a la carte as in most steakhouses. For example:
    - The amish chicken comes with roasted potatoes and wilted spinach.
    - The steak comes with crispy fried shallots.
    - The duck confit comes with a charcroute of cabbage and veal sausage.


    Perhaps they should go one way or the other.

    Personally, I do not consider a pile of fried onions a side, although Paramount room is not the first to do this.
  • Post #22 - December 22nd, 2007, 9:00 am
    Post #22 - December 22nd, 2007, 9:00 am Post #22 - December 22nd, 2007, 9:00 am
    aschie30 wrote:The Dyson (TM) hand dryers in the bathroom are worth the trip for a beer alone.

    They have these in the men's room at my Temple!
  • Post #23 - December 22nd, 2007, 10:13 pm
    Post #23 - December 22nd, 2007, 10:13 pm Post #23 - December 22nd, 2007, 10:13 pm
    On a related note, can anyone tell me what the story is with Kobe showing up on every bar menu lately? In general I haven't been impressed with what I've had so am I correct in assuming that they're serving a low grade of genuine Kobe beef? Or is U.S. raised beef somehow being passed off as Kobe now?


    my guess is that some restaurant owners are simply lying. not saying this is true of the paramount, or any other place specifically, but it's really really easy to type the word "Kobe" when you're composing a menu, and really difficult for anyone to prove otherwise.
  • Post #24 - January 15th, 2008, 10:31 am
    Post #24 - January 15th, 2008, 10:31 am Post #24 - January 15th, 2008, 10:31 am
    LTH,

    Had an enjoyable lunch at the Paramount Room yesterday, starting with Scotch Egg, which Kiplog pictured so beautifully earlier in the thread. Count me a fan, one bite and I was thinking of stopping for quail eggs and sausage to make minis for dinner.

    My lunch companions had burgers, big juicy burgers, which come with fries or tempura green beans.

    Paramount Room Burger
    Image

    I went with Croque Madam as I had a Kuma's Plague Bringer the night before and, while I liked the sandwich, still had a bit of burger envy.

    Croque Madame
    Image
    Image

    I had the pleasure of MAG and Elena Marre's company at lunch and as MAG is a regular at Volo, same ownership, and knew the bartender/manager on duty we were brought a couple of on-the-house appetizers, including a knock your socks off Steak Tartar.

    Steak Tartar
    Image

    I liked the overall feel of the room, comfortable bar area with some table seating in the rear, and thought the food fairly priced for the quality and skill level displayed.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Last edited by G Wiv on January 15th, 2008, 11:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
    Sauce on the side, always, implied, axiomatic..........never a doubt, BBQ sauce without.

    Low & Slow
  • Post #25 - January 15th, 2008, 10:46 am
    Post #25 - January 15th, 2008, 10:46 am Post #25 - January 15th, 2008, 10:46 am
    Gary,

    That steak tartare looks fantastic. Quick question about it...how was the spice level? Volo's is simply too spicy for my tastes so I'm curious how this one compares.
    -Josh

    I've started blogging about the Stuff I Eat
  • Post #26 - January 15th, 2008, 10:57 am
    Post #26 - January 15th, 2008, 10:57 am Post #26 - January 15th, 2008, 10:57 am
    jesteinf wrote:That steak tartare looks fantastic. Quick question about it...how was the spice level. Volo's is simply to spicy for my tastes so I'm curious how this one compares.

    Josh,

    There's a Dijon mustard kick, but not over the top spicy with the raw egg yolk buffering the overall effect.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Sauce on the side, always, implied, axiomatic..........never a doubt, BBQ sauce without.

    Low & Slow
  • Post #27 - January 16th, 2008, 11:21 am
    Post #27 - January 16th, 2008, 11:21 am Post #27 - January 16th, 2008, 11:21 am
    I have to strongly disagree with those complaining about the price of Paramount. While I haven't had the Scotch egg that everyone says is way overpriced, I think many of the items are very fairly priced. Last night we stopped in for dinner and had a croque madam, which was delicious and definitely worth the $10, an enormous portion of perfect tempura green beans (and I believe the chili sauce pares perfectly with the light and crispy beans), their unbelievably good steak tartare and the Caesar (a slight disappointment, but still very tasty). We also sampled an excellent Oregon pinot (all bottles of wine are half-price on Tuesdays, and cocktails are $2 off), making our very filling dinner less than $100.
    The prices of their entrees are very comparable to those at other restaurants of the same caliber and are large portions -- I dare you to complain about the size and quality of their $14 fish and chips. Some of the best I've had (holds up to the fish and chips I ate at the best fish joint on the boardwalk in Southport, England a few years back). I also think the oysters and mussels hold up on quality and quantity for the budget-conscious. Give the Paramount another shot to change your mind.
    (And no, I'm not associated with Paramount in any way -- I'm just excited to have the place in my neighborhood -- I only live a few blocks away).
  • Post #28 - January 20th, 2008, 1:37 pm
    Post #28 - January 20th, 2008, 1:37 pm Post #28 - January 20th, 2008, 1:37 pm
    That steak tartare looks fantastic. Quick question about it...how was the spice level? Volo's is simply too spicy for my tastes so I'm curious how this one compares.


    As mentioned, it has a slight kick, but I definitely notice a high caper-to-meat ratio.

    Image

    I've sat next to 2 different locals chefs who have proclaimed it the perfect classic balance. But I don't know, since I've only had tartare where the onions and capers were on the side, where the eater could add them to their taste. Here, you're in trust with the chef.
  • Post #29 - January 20th, 2008, 4:55 pm
    Post #29 - January 20th, 2008, 4:55 pm Post #29 - January 20th, 2008, 4:55 pm
    Okay, the tartare looks scrumptious, but that price for a Scotch Egg is highway robbery IMO - is the atmosphere worth that much? Until then I'll stick to the Scotch Eggs at the Pepper Canister on Wells ($4 for two & a good selection of beers on tap).
  • Post #30 - January 20th, 2008, 7:17 pm
    Post #30 - January 20th, 2008, 7:17 pm Post #30 - January 20th, 2008, 7:17 pm
    Athena wrote:Okay, the tartare looks scrumptious, but that price for a Scotch Egg is highway robbery IMO - is the atmosphere worth that much? Until then I'll stick to the Scotch Eggs at the Pepper Canister on Wells ($4 for two & a good selection of beers on tap).


    IMHO, the atmosphere in the basement is lacking. While I like a dark cozy room the incredibly high ceilings made me feel like I sat at the bottom of a well. Also, flat screen TVs everywhere doesn't do much for me.

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