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Favorite Chicago Restaurants and Fast food from the past

Favorite Chicago Restaurants and Fast food from the past
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  • Post #271 - March 12th, 2013, 2:28 pm
    Post #271 - March 12th, 2013, 2:28 pm Post #271 - March 12th, 2013, 2:28 pm
    Pursuit wrote:Two loop lunch places that come to mind and are greatly missed: Ups and Downs, which did terrific carved beef tenderloin sandwiches on an onion roll, and the legendary Bar RR where I'd always get the "Talian!" and a beer


    I remember as a new recruit at Arthur Andersen being taken to the Bar RR as a rite of passage, back in July 1981. That brings back memories! It was the first place I received a "two martini" lunch.

    Does anyone remember a far south side Italian place called the Tivoli - within a half hour's drive of the junction between Park Forest, Chicago Heights, and Olympia Fields? I recall they had a really good version of shrimp scampi, which is still the model for my own recipe for the dish.
  • Post #272 - March 28th, 2013, 5:57 pm
    Post #272 - March 28th, 2013, 5:57 pm Post #272 - March 28th, 2013, 5:57 pm
    themaven wrote:Does anybody remember that Creole/Cajun po'boy place that used to be on Damen Ave. in Wicker Park, circa 1990? They had the best fried oysters and shrimp that I have had in this city (prior to my visit to Troha's last fall). Cracker meal breading; not cornmeal (too heavy), or flour (too light, and oddly flavored), or batter (too thick) and nicely seasoned. Just like Mom used to make. I really miss them. If I remember correctly, it was owned by a pair of brothers from Louisiana. What happened to those guys anyway? Did they open a new place?


    You're not talking about Merlot Joe. Early-mid 90's on Damen.
    Christina~~
  • Post #273 - March 29th, 2013, 3:39 pm
    Post #273 - March 29th, 2013, 3:39 pm Post #273 - March 29th, 2013, 3:39 pm
    Does anyone remember an early 1900s-themed ice cream place called Mayberry's that was located in, I believe, Deerfield, in the same shopping center as the General Cinema complex? That was our go-to spot after mini golfing just down the road in the late '70s. They had a giant concoction called The Sink, and if you could Sink the Sink you got a free T-shirt or something like that.

    Around '84, a pizza place called the Clubhouse opened on Ogden Avenue just east of Garfield in Hinsdale. It was otherwise unspectacular, but at the time I thought their thin-crust pizza was absolutely amazing, with this uber-dense cheese on it that I haven't seen since, except for Beggar's.
  • Post #274 - April 1st, 2013, 8:54 am
    Post #274 - April 1st, 2013, 8:54 am Post #274 - April 1st, 2013, 8:54 am
    I have very fond memories of my mom taking me to Mammy's Pancake House which was across the street from Marshall Fields on Randolph. We always ordered Silver Dollar Pancakes. The highlight was when they brought the syrup. There were like two dozen little bottles of every flavor of syrup on a big three tiered spinning lazy susan contraption...my fave was apple cinnamon! I think Mammy's is a parking garage now.
  • Post #275 - April 10th, 2013, 9:05 pm
    Post #275 - April 10th, 2013, 9:05 pm Post #275 - April 10th, 2013, 9:05 pm
    I grew up on the SW side, across the street from Midway. My mother worked as a waitress at The French Kitchen in the early 80's. There was a little shack pizza place called The Charcoal Pit at 63rd and Knox. Anytime I smell a charcoal oven at a restaurant it instantly takes me back. It's probably the first place I had Italian Beef. Farrell's at Ford City was also a big memory for me as well.
  • Post #276 - April 14th, 2013, 8:49 pm
    Post #276 - April 14th, 2013, 8:49 pm Post #276 - April 14th, 2013, 8:49 pm
    Biggs
    Le Cheminee
    Armando's
    Fritzel's
    Jacques
    Le Bordeaux (Kiki's first)
    L'Escargot

    Don't know if these have already been mentioned, but these
    are some of my "memory Lane "
    "With enough butter, anything is good."-Julia Child
  • Post #277 - April 15th, 2013, 10:26 am
    Post #277 - April 15th, 2013, 10:26 am Post #277 - April 15th, 2013, 10:26 am
    [quote="La Cuenta"]Does anyone remember an early 1900s-themed ice cream place called Mayberry's that was located in, I believe, Deerfield, in the same shopping center as the General Cinema complex? That was our go-to spot after mini golfing just down the road in the late '70s. They had a giant concoction called The Sink, and if you could Sink the Sink you got a free T-shirt or something like that.

    Oh ya, this was my Dad's fave place for ice cream in the summer. We went to one in Arlington Heights over on Rand Road. Anytime somebody ordered the Sink, a siren went off....or maybe that was when they finished. Either way, I always wanted to try to sink the sink, but never got the chance due to Dad's better judgement
    "Living well is the best revenge"
  • Post #278 - April 15th, 2013, 11:24 am
    Post #278 - April 15th, 2013, 11:24 am Post #278 - April 15th, 2013, 11:24 am
    Ah, the Tivoli! One of my favorite south suburban restaurants and sadly, gone. They had the best bleu cheese dressing I ever ate. At one point, they had a second location at 183rd and Kedzie, but it didn't last long.

    Suzy
    " There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life."
    - Frank Zappa
  • Post #279 - April 25th, 2013, 11:25 pm
    Post #279 - April 25th, 2013, 11:25 pm Post #279 - April 25th, 2013, 11:25 pm
    I'm not sure if this is the correct thread for this question, but does anyone remember the name of the restaurant that was in the Oceanique space on Main in Evanston before Oceanique opened? It was in the late '80s, I'm thinking.
    "Life is a combination of magic and pasta." -- Federico Fellini

    "You're not going to like it in Chicago. The wind comes howling in from the lake. And there's practically no opera season at all--and the Lord only knows whether they've ever heard of lobster Newburg." --Charles Foster Kane, Citizen Kane.
  • Post #280 - April 26th, 2013, 9:13 am
    Post #280 - April 26th, 2013, 9:13 am Post #280 - April 26th, 2013, 9:13 am
    tarte tatin wrote:I'm not sure if this is the correct thread for this question, but does anyone remember the name of the restaurant that was in the Oceanique space on Main in Evanston before Oceanique opened? It was in the late '80s, I'm thinking.

    In case no one here responds, you might try asking the folks at the Evanston History Center in the Charles Dawes House. I bet they can tell you.
  • Post #281 - April 26th, 2013, 9:26 am
    Post #281 - April 26th, 2013, 9:26 am Post #281 - April 26th, 2013, 9:26 am
    tarte tatin wrote:I'm not sure if this is the correct thread for this question, but does anyone remember the name of the restaurant that was in the Oceanique space on Main in Evanston before Oceanique opened? It was in the late '80s, I'm thinking.

    Oceanique opened in 1989. Before that it was Jaton’s and in the early 1980s, Budapest Café. Even earlier, one of the Cooley’s Cupboards was there for many decades.
  • Post #282 - April 26th, 2013, 5:06 pm
    Post #282 - April 26th, 2013, 5:06 pm Post #282 - April 26th, 2013, 5:06 pm
    Gail asked the same question at lunch yesterday. One of the first responses was "I bet Peter Engler would know." Prescient.
  • Post #283 - May 2nd, 2013, 4:38 pm
    Post #283 - May 2nd, 2013, 4:38 pm Post #283 - May 2nd, 2013, 4:38 pm
    I have to add my memory of a restaurant long gone to see how off my memories of it are. I was about 4-5 when we'd go there so it's my memories are not very accurate. The place was called Full House located out at Irving Park and Barrington roads. I remember it had an incredible salad bar and a giant fireplace in the center of a large room. It seemed we always went with a group of people to celebrate something. And I got to play with the cigarette machine while we waited for a table. Does anyone have any memory of this place?
    Christina~~
  • Post #284 - May 2nd, 2013, 5:00 pm
    Post #284 - May 2nd, 2013, 5:00 pm Post #284 - May 2nd, 2013, 5:00 pm
    Xpi6tiva wrote:I have to add my memory of a restaurant long gone to see how off my memories of it are. I was about 4-5 when we'd go there so it's my memories are not very accurate. The place was called Full House located out at Irving Park and Barrington roads. I remember it had an incredible salad bar and a giant fireplace in the center of a large room. It seemed we always went with a group of people to celebrate something. And I got to play with the cigarette machine while we waited for a table. Does anyone have any memory of this place?


    If this can be trusted, that location (mid-70s through 90s as Full House, possibly) used to be kid-friendly St. George and the Dragon in the late 60s, which I've heard about through my folks; sounds like the birthday tradition may have continued into its next iteration.
  • Post #285 - May 2nd, 2013, 5:08 pm
    Post #285 - May 2nd, 2013, 5:08 pm Post #285 - May 2nd, 2013, 5:08 pm
    Xpi6tiva wrote:And I got to play with the cigarette machine while we waited for a table. Does anyone have any memory of this place?


    It's memories like this that make me weep for today's youth. Children playing with machines that dispense instruments of death! What has happened to our country?!
    "Living well is the best revenge"
  • Post #286 - May 3rd, 2013, 9:51 am
    Post #286 - May 3rd, 2013, 9:51 am Post #286 - May 3rd, 2013, 9:51 am
    @santander It's fun reading through the comments on that page. It brings up a ton of memories. Thanks for sharing.

    @Pursuit Today's youth are missing out on a ton more than playing with "instruments of death". I remember laying out behind the back seat, up near the rear windshield. No seat belts, no safety seats. Whee!
    Christina~~
  • Post #287 - May 22nd, 2013, 4:42 pm
    Post #287 - May 22nd, 2013, 4:42 pm Post #287 - May 22nd, 2013, 4:42 pm
    Santander wrote:Realizing it's a longshot: does anyone recall a "Casper's Place" (or in an original incarnation, "Casper's Friendly Place") on Manheim Road in the 'burbs in the late 1960s / early 1970s? I'm researching it for a family project and would love to hear any recollections or mentions you run across, however vague.


    Another longshot: SunGong Chop Suey or Sun Gong Chinese Restaurant on or near Central, on the North Side, in the 60s and 70s. Any memories or stories appreciated; for a friend.
  • Post #288 - August 3rd, 2013, 6:50 am
    Post #288 - August 3rd, 2013, 6:50 am Post #288 - August 3rd, 2013, 6:50 am
    cito wrote:
    Tom wrote:Ria's Pizza: 3943 N Lincoln Ave, Chicago. Really good deep dish, my favorite neighborhood pizza back in the late 1960's--early 1970's.


    Ria's provided me with my first deep dish experience. I was a big fan of their pizzas, and we preferred them over Lou Malnati's Lincolnwood (his one and only location at that time). Ria's was always busy, and I have always wondered why they closed-- early 80's if my memory is accurate.

    Does anyone remember who was the owners of Ria's pizza? Is their any way I can get in touch with anyone who worked their ? Any info would be so much appreciated Thanks Dee
  • Post #289 - August 3rd, 2013, 7:25 am
    Post #289 - August 3rd, 2013, 7:25 am Post #289 - August 3rd, 2013, 7:25 am
    ddam7 wrote:
    cito wrote:
    Tom wrote:Ria's Pizza: 3943 N Lincoln Ave, Chicago. Really good deep dish, my favorite neighborhood pizza back in the late 1960's--early 1970's.


    Ria's provided me with my first deep dish experience. I was a big fan of their pizzas, and we preferred them over Lou Malnati's Lincolnwood (his one and only location at that time). Ria's was always busy, and I have always wondered why they closed-- early 80's if my memory is accurate.

    Does anyone remember who was the owners of Ria's pizza? Is their any way I can get in touch with anyone who worked their ? Any info would be so much appreciated Thanks Dee


    The only thing I remember about Ria's was that they delivered pizza till 4AM and they had some semi-famous cartoonist do the artwork in the store and on the carry out menu.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #290 - August 15th, 2013, 12:10 pm
    Post #290 - August 15th, 2013, 12:10 pm Post #290 - August 15th, 2013, 12:10 pm
    There are a lot of restaurants on this list that have been mentioned already (and a lot mentioned that aren't on this list), but it's fun seeing photos of restaurants that were part of our lives in the past.

    http://www.craigslostchicago.com/lost-eateries.php
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #291 - February 26th, 2014, 8:53 am
    Post #291 - February 26th, 2014, 8:53 am Post #291 - February 26th, 2014, 8:53 am
    Phil wrote:Janson's, another famous Beverly hamburger/hot dog drive in still stands at 99th and Western.

    New owner to open Janson’s
    After nearly two years of standing vacant on the corner of 99th Street and Western Avenue, Janson’s Drive-In has a new owner and is expected to open by summer.

    Janson’s new owner, Haiwei Yuan, of Griffith, Ind., said he is completing rehab work that began in April 2012 after real estate developer Mike Ford purchased the property earlier that year with Gus and Wendy Pettas.

    Ford, of Palos Park, had planned to open Janson’s in June 2012, he said in a previous interview with The Beverly Review. He has since sold his interest in the business after he was unable to secure financing to finish the rehab work, according to sources.

    The Pettases, who owned and operated Wheatfield’s Restaurant in Tinley Park for 27 years, are still on board and will serve as the operation managers for Janson’s once it reopens, Yuan said.

    “I’m using the same supplier and keeping the tradition and taste,” Yuan said.

    A Beverly landmark for more than 50 years, Janson’s recipe for success was fresh, quality ingredients and efficient service, according to Joe Janson, whose father John “Jack” and his brother Tom opened the restaurant in September 1960.

    “We always used name-brand ingredients—never the cheap ketchup and mustard—and we used a produce man who delivered the lettuce, tomatoes and onions fresh everyday,” Joe said. “We gave the customers a good product for their money.”

    Janson’s hot dogs were made by Oscar Meyer but were prepared with beef instead of the traditional pork, Joe said. The recipe was unique to Janson’s and one other hot dog stand in the city of Chicago, he said.

    http://www.jansonsdrivein.com
    Image
  • Post #292 - February 26th, 2014, 11:50 pm
    Post #292 - February 26th, 2014, 11:50 pm Post #292 - February 26th, 2014, 11:50 pm
    Does anyone recall a lunch spot called the Savoy? It was in the same building where Everest is. It was like a precursor to food life, run by LEYE according to my memory. There were a range of food choices, prices were reasonable. I Used to meet a friend there often, he has since passed away and nobody seems to know this place. Thanks.
  • Post #293 - February 27th, 2014, 6:25 am
    Post #293 - February 27th, 2014, 6:25 am Post #293 - February 27th, 2014, 6:25 am
    Savoy was popular for years with CBOE and CBOT members. They had wonderful breakfast service, and opened very early. Having only visited for breakfast from time to time, I'm not sure when they closed, I don't recall them serving dinner.

    There was no ground-level access or signage, one had to know about the Savoy to go there, but as I recall, they had good food. After markets had been open for a couple of hours and trading slowed up, there were half a dozen places where traders would go for breakfast or lunch, and Savoy was one of them. The members' cafeteria at the Board of Trade (now CME after the merger) was convenient, but they served awful food and rancid coffee, still do.
  • Post #294 - April 7th, 2014, 8:47 am
    Post #294 - April 7th, 2014, 8:47 am Post #294 - April 7th, 2014, 8:47 am
    Artie wrote:
    Phil wrote:Janson's, another famous Beverly hamburger/hot dog drive in still stands at 99th and Western.

    New owner to open Janson’s
    After nearly two years of standing vacant on the corner of 99th Street and Western Avenue, Janson’s Drive-In has a new owner and is Iconic, retro drive-in opens its doors on Monday under new ownership after two-year absence.
    Posted by Lorraine Swanson (Editor) , April 06, 2014 at 09:06 PM

    The iconic Janson’s Drive-In at 9900 S. Western Ave., will re-open on Monday under new ownership.

    Local residents were heartbroken when the landmark Beverly restaurant announced it’s closing after 52 years in 2012.

    Gus and Wendy Pettas, and developer Mike Ford bought the restaurant and have been renovating it ever since.

    Patch called in the middle of a training session over the weekend, but we were told that Janson's will open its doors at 10:30 a.m. Monday.

    For the time being, Janson’s will be open from 10:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., seven days a week.

    Janson’s is already taking lunch orders by phone at 773-941-6283.

    Welcome back! Here’s to another 50 years.expected to open by summer.

    Janson’s new owner, Haiwei Yuan, of Griffith, Ind., said he is completing rehab work that began in April 2012 after real estate developer Mike Ford purchased the property earlier that year with Gus and Wendy Pettas.

    The Pettases, who owned and operated Wheatfield’s Restaurant in Tinley Park for 27 years, are still on board and will serve as the operation managers for Janson’s once it reopens, Yuan said.

    “I’m using the same supplier and keeping the tradition and taste,” Yuan said.

    A Beverly landmark for more than 50 years, Janson’s recipe for success was fresh, quality ingredients and efficient service, according to Joe Janson, whose father John “Jack” and his brother Tom opened the restaurant in September 1960.

    “We always used name-brand ingredients—never the cheap ketchup and mustard—and we used a produce man who delivered the lettuce, tomatoes and onions fresh everyday,” Joe said. “We gave the customers a good product for their money.”

    Janson’s hot dogs were made by Oscar Meyer but were prepared with beef instead of the traditional pork, Joe said. The recipe was unique to Janson’s and one other hot dog stand in the city of Chicago, he said.

    http://www.jansonsdrivein.com
    Image

    New Era Starts Monday for Re-Opened Janson’s Drive-In
    Iconic, retro drive-in opens its doors on Monday under new ownership after two-year absence.

    The iconic Janson’s Drive-In at 9900 S. Western Ave., will re-open on Monday under new ownership.

    Local residents were heartbroken when the landmark Beverly restaurant announced it’s closing after 52 years in 2012.

    Gus and Wendy Pettas, and developer Mike Ford bought the restaurant and have been renovating it ever since.

    Patch called in the middle of a training session over the weekend, but we were told that Janson's will open its doors at 10:30 a.m. Monday.

    For the time being, Janson’s will be open from 10:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., seven days a week.

    Janson’s is already taking lunch orders by phone at 773-941-6283.
  • Post #295 - August 15th, 2015, 4:36 pm
    Post #295 - August 15th, 2015, 4:36 pm Post #295 - August 15th, 2015, 4:36 pm
    d4v3 wrote:
    spinynorman99 wrote:
    The spouse recalls an ice cream place in the North Riverside Mall, 1970's and perhaps into the early 80's, with a specialty dish called the Pike's Peak, a huge sundae for five or more persons. She says that the Peak was carried out by two waiters, in a huge bowl.


    Possibly Farrell's, a chain from the West Coast.
    Yeah, Pikes Peak was definitely a Farrell's thing. It may have been the progenitor of the Trough. In the 70's, they had the Pike's Peak and the Zoo (which they still have). They would sometimes change the name of Pikes Peak to a local mountain, and the Zoo to a local zoo. In Seattle, the Peak was called the Mt. Ranier and the Zoo was called the Woodland. In Portland, it was Mt.Hood and Burnside. I wonder if the N. Riverside place served a "Brookfield Zoo" ?

    Robert “Bob” Farrell, the founder of the popular Farrell’s Ice Cream Parlour chain that opened shops across the nation, died Friday morning. He was 88 years old.

    http://www.katu.com/news/local/Farrells ... l?mobile=y
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #296 - August 15th, 2015, 9:13 pm
    Post #296 - August 15th, 2015, 9:13 pm Post #296 - August 15th, 2015, 9:13 pm
    We used to have ribs from Black Angus for dinner every Sunday. After they closed Millers became our Sunday spot.
    Now both are just fond memories….
  • Post #297 - August 15th, 2015, 10:17 pm
    Post #297 - August 15th, 2015, 10:17 pm Post #297 - August 15th, 2015, 10:17 pm
    I don't know if the former (I have not been there since the changes,but after seeing the latest menus,I will have to try it) Berghoff Restaurant has been mentioned,and I apologize if it has. I visited there dozens of times during the second generation. These are the most of the memories I have,save one. http://www.berghoff.com/history2.php
    The one not on the website but I'll always remember is the time we took our friend,the semi-pro football player with the biggest appetite I've ever seen, there when he was just a boy. The "professional waiter" was nearly exhausted refilling his water and bringing enough bread to make an entire loaf!
    It’s more fun to talk with someone who doesn’t use
    long, difficult words but rather short, easy words like
    “What about lunch?”
    —Winnie The Pooh
    "... a good dinner is of great importance to good talk. One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well."
    Virginia Woolf : A Room of One's Own
  • Post #298 - November 1st, 2017, 9:25 am
    Post #298 - November 1st, 2017, 9:25 am Post #298 - November 1st, 2017, 9:25 am
    Dearly departed: 15 Chicago restaurants Phil Vettel misses the most

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/dining/re ... story.html
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #299 - December 12th, 2017, 10:48 am
    Post #299 - December 12th, 2017, 10:48 am Post #299 - December 12th, 2017, 10:48 am
    Rene G wrote:
    Tom wrote:I remember a Wimpy's in the north Loop (Randolph or Washington west of State Street) back in the early 1960's.

    The Loop had Wimpy Grills since the 1930s and at one time they numbered over ten. By 1965 they were down to four Loop locations: 17 E Washington, 159 N Wabash, 1 N Clark and 20 W Monroe. In addition to a few in the neighborhoods, there was a Wimpy's on Chicago just west of Michigan. That stretch of Chicago Avenue between Michigan & State would become a magnet for fast food chains when they were still somewhat unusual downtown. By 1977 Arby's, Jack-in-the-Box, Burger King and McDonald's could all be found in those few blocks.

    Tom wrote:If memory serves, "fast food" as we know it today--McDonald's, Wendy's and the like--didn't invade the Loop before the 1970's. They were a suburban and outlying city phenomenon that didn't exist in the inner city.

    Burger King, which opened at State & Congress in 1973, might have been the first of the nationally-known fast food chains to open near the Loop. But King Kastle (a White Castle imitator) was already at State & Randolph by that time and places like Burger City and Burgerbar* were on State Street in the '60s. Wendy's opened in 1975 at Clark & Madison and so might have been the first major burger chain in the Loop (I suppose one could argue whether it was a major chain back then).

    * See jazzman's mention above. Burgerbar was at 156 N and 350 S State.


    I personally remember eating many times with my Father at the Wimpy's located at 75 East Washington Street (not 17 E. Washington), which was at North Garland Court (a named alley), Downtown Chicago. Today the location is a Dunkin Donut shop.
    Neil Gale, PhD
    Historian

    Living History of Illinois and Chicago
    http://LivingHistoryofIllinois.org
    Living History of Illinois and Chicago Digital Library
    http://LivingHistoryofIllinois.com
    Illinois History Store
    http://IllinoisHistoryStore.org
  • Post #300 - December 12th, 2017, 6:45 pm
    Post #300 - December 12th, 2017, 6:45 pm Post #300 - December 12th, 2017, 6:45 pm
    does anybody remember the food counter in Lurie Bros Dept store on 26th street? Best bohemian pork loin and dumplings.
    Also on 26th street was Antionettes restuarant with the best Hot Beef Platter.
    Do you remember El Bianco at 63rd and California? My first exposure to a high end Italian restaurant

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