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  • The Bagel

    Post #1 - November 24th, 2009, 10:56 pm
    Post #1 - November 24th, 2009, 10:56 pm Post #1 - November 24th, 2009, 10:56 pm
    Because mrbarolo doesn't want to change his vituperative thread title (which is his right), I'm starting a new thread with a more neutral name. My thread may not get nearly as many views or responses, but at least it will exist--and come up at some point when people do searches.

    Here's a list of things I like about The Bagel:

    1. The pickles, which you can tell used to be cucumbers. That's the kind of pickle I like. And they're put on the table for free.

    2. The chicken soup with matzo ball or kreplach. The broth is rich and homemade tasting, with just enough salt. The matzo ball is huge but not heavy. The kreplach dough could never be called delicate, but it tastes good, and the ground beef inside is garlicky and delicious. The Bagel has my favorite versions of these soups in the city.

    3. The chocolate phosphates made by "my" waitress there. Perfection. Just the right proportion of chocolate to soda. Once you start sipping, you just wish the glass could never end.

    4. The guys behind the takeout counter, who always greet me with a smile (unless it's Sunday morning when they're crazy busy, but I understand).

    5. The nova lox, mild and delicious.

    6. The fries. They're unconventional, with more "crust" on them than some, and I'm not sure how they do that (others here could probably explain the cooking process that creates the texture), but I like them a lot.

    7. The mushroom barley soup, which I hardly ever get because I like the chicken soup so much.

    8. The pastrami. I'm not saying it's as good as Manny's. But it doesn't have to be as good as Manny's to be good.

    9. The blintzes. I had them once and like them.

    10. Yes, free parking.

    11. The challah, put on the table free just like the pickles. Fresh and tasty. A little butter on it, and dipped into the chicken soup, and it becomes heavenly.

    That's really just a start. Maybe I'll nominate The Bagel for a GNR the next time that comes around. Its legions of fans would certainly agree with the designation.
  • Post #2 - November 24th, 2009, 11:03 pm
    Post #2 - November 24th, 2009, 11:03 pm Post #2 - November 24th, 2009, 11:03 pm
    riddlemay wrote:6. The fries. They're unconventional, with more "crust" on them than some, and I'm not sure how they do that (others here could probably explain the cooking process that creates the texture), but I like them a lot.


    That process usually consists of opening the freezer bag that contains frozen spuds coated with a chemically treated food starch of some kind, then dumping into hot oil.
    ...defended from strong temptations to social ambition by a still stronger taste for tripe and onions." Screwtape in The Screwtape Letters by CS Lewis

    Fuckerberg on Food
  • Post #3 - November 24th, 2009, 11:13 pm
    Post #3 - November 24th, 2009, 11:13 pm Post #3 - November 24th, 2009, 11:13 pm
    I'm having a hard time deciding how to talk about The Bagel. I like it once in a while. Usually, driving back down Skokie Blvd. with the kids, where my other choices are Portillo's, Pantera and Pchipotle. But part of what I like about it is that it's unchallengingly okay. I'm not going to have a corned beef epiphany. I'm not going to have fantastic service. I do like the pickles, maybe because I don't know better, but for the same reason, because they're recognizably cucumbers. I'm fine with skipping the fries. I like the slightly dated Broadway show posters. Occasionally I make the mistake of ordering anything other than corned beef or pastrami or a Reuben, and I'm reminded firmly why it's a mistake. There's something big city about it that speaks to the Catholic kid from Kansas who wanted to be a Jewish writer for Mad Magazine, and an out-of-date, slightly uncaring slightly-better-than-mediocrity is part of that. I like that I'm often the youngest person there other than my own sons. I have a lot of affection for it. It has no business being a GNR on any culinary ground whatsoever. My world would be poorer without it. Feel free to use that on the plaque.
    Last edited by Mike G on November 24th, 2009, 11:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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  • Post #4 - November 24th, 2009, 11:14 pm
    Post #4 - November 24th, 2009, 11:14 pm Post #4 - November 24th, 2009, 11:14 pm
    Kennyz wrote:
    riddlemay wrote:6. The fries. They're unconventional, with more "crust" on them than some, and I'm not sure how they do that (others here could probably explain the cooking process that creates the texture), but I like them a lot.


    That process usually consists of opening the freezer bag that contains frozen spuds coated with a chemically treated food starch of some kind, then dumping into hot oil.


    Yeah, the fries at The Bagel are sort of in the Burger King family of frozen fry product. If that's your thing though, go for it.

    I do like the nova, most of the time. As I mentioned in the other thread, though, the bagels can be problematic. Their fried matzoh is ok (but definitely not as good as my mom's).
    -Josh

    I've started blogging about the Stuff I Eat
  • Post #5 - November 24th, 2009, 11:14 pm
    Post #5 - November 24th, 2009, 11:14 pm Post #5 - November 24th, 2009, 11:14 pm
    Mike G wrote:it's unchallengingly okay.


    Exactly how I feel.
    -Josh

    I've started blogging about the Stuff I Eat
  • Post #6 - November 25th, 2009, 1:31 am
    Post #6 - November 25th, 2009, 1:31 am Post #6 - November 25th, 2009, 1:31 am
    riddlemay wrote:9. The blintzes. I had them once and like them.

    High praise, I'll run right over.

    Oh, wait, I fell for the Riddlemay we are being too harsh once before, IHop [Skip and Jump], and was graced with a perfectly mediocre meal. Maybe I'll wait a bit on the Bagel blintz.

    Regards,
    Gary 'fool me once' Wiviott
    Sauce on the side, always, implied, axiomatic..........never a doubt, BBQ sauce without.

    Low & Slow
  • Post #7 - November 25th, 2009, 6:04 am
    Post #7 - November 25th, 2009, 6:04 am Post #7 - November 25th, 2009, 6:04 am
    I have never been convinced that going to the Bagel would benefit me. Mike G's description sounded an awful lot like What's Cookin' to me. Are they in the same class of spot?
  • Post #8 - November 25th, 2009, 7:18 am
    Post #8 - November 25th, 2009, 7:18 am Post #8 - November 25th, 2009, 7:18 am
    G Wiv wrote:
    riddlemay wrote:9. The blintzes. I had them once and like them.

    High praise, I'll run right over.

    Oh, wait, I fell for the Riddlemay we are being too harsh once before, IHop [Skip and Jump], and was graced with a perfectly mediocre meal. Maybe I'll wait a bit on the Bagel blintz.

    Regards,
    Gary 'fool me once' Wiviott

    I'm sorry you felt fooled by me, Gary. That wasn't my intention. (Believe it or not, I don't spend time thinking how I can trick you into visiting restaurants. :) ) In any case, my Bagelphilia is in a different category from what I wrote on that thread. What motivated me to write about iHop was a "hey, I'm surprised as much as anyone that the place isn't nearly as bad as I've thought it was for the last forty-five years, and that might be worth writing about" thing. With The Bagel, a more positive affection motivates me.

    Should you eventually go, I hope you won't be disappointed.
  • Post #9 - November 25th, 2009, 11:27 am
    Post #9 - November 25th, 2009, 11:27 am Post #9 - November 25th, 2009, 11:27 am
    It's simple - get the salami melt sandwich. Sweating slices of salami under a blanket of muenster cheese
  • Post #10 - November 25th, 2009, 2:37 pm
    Post #10 - November 25th, 2009, 2:37 pm Post #10 - November 25th, 2009, 2:37 pm
    jesteinf wrote:As I mentioned in the other thread, though, the bagels can be problematic.
    Couldn't tell from the other thread--do you think the bagels aren't good to start with or is the issue with toasted bagels that are cold, or both?

    As mentioned in the other thread, I am very fond of the cabbage borscht and the chopped liver. If I get chopped liver somewhere else, I always end up wishing it were the Bagel's version. If I order anything else at the Bagel, I end up wishing it were the cabbage borscht and chopped liver. I might take a couple for the team and try or retry some other menu offerings.

    My FIL likes the pickled whitefish. Can't say I really have the urge to try that one, although I've enjoyed smoked whitefish in Michigan in the past.
    "things like being careful with your coriander/ that's what makes the gravy grander" - Sondheim
  • Post #11 - November 25th, 2009, 2:50 pm
    Post #11 - November 25th, 2009, 2:50 pm Post #11 - November 25th, 2009, 2:50 pm
    grits wrote:
    jesteinf wrote:As I mentioned in the other thread, though, the bagels can be problematic.
    Couldn't tell from the other thread--do you think the bagels aren't good to start with or is the issue with toasted bagels that are cold, or both?
    I've never had them toasted, so I can only speak to them as they come directly off of the pile. They're not good; not good at all.

    I actually really like The Bagel. It's not great by any means, but it's good. The service I've received there has always been very warm, the matzo ball soup is good, the tzimmes are delicious (if a bit sweet) and I'm a huge fan of their kugel, except on occasion when the top is a little too dried out (the rest is still good, I just leave the dry parts behind). As far as the challah, it's a little too light and airy to my taste (I like slightly eggier, denser, stringier challah), but it makes great French toast and bread pudding (you can buy it by the loaf to go).

    -Dan
  • Post #12 - November 25th, 2009, 4:55 pm
    Post #12 - November 25th, 2009, 4:55 pm Post #12 - November 25th, 2009, 4:55 pm
    Well, I've lived out here in Skokie for over 20 years, and I consider the Bagel at Old Orchard a "known" quantity. That's because I realize that the Bagel has about three things that I routinely order, and I don't bother with the rest of the menu.

    I think the Mish Mosh soup is very good. As others in thread have noted, the chicken broth here is full flavored, and very clear - it reminds me of good New York deli chicken broth. In the Mish Mosh soup, you get a combination of one matzo ball, one kreplach, noodles, rice, and kasha. It's all pretty good, and lord knows, there is a lot of it. When I was also a gourmand, I'd polish it off at one sitting - now it is two meals for me.

    And after thinking about it, any combination of the chicken broth and a carbohydrate is pretty good.

    Second, the Chicken in a Pot reminds me of my grandmother's - which makes it good based on childhood palate memory. I know, some of you think it overcooked, others think it bland - but it just works for me.

    Finally, the mushroom barley soup is also pretty good, nice earthy mushroom flavors, and it sticks to the ribs. I will get that soup with a half corned beef on rye, and be perfectly happy.

    So the Bagel has become a utility for me. When I need a fix of good soup, or chicken in the pot - I just go. Otherwise, it really doesn't enter my mind, except when the rest of Old Orchard's few restaurant choices are packed, and I need something to eat, RIGHT NOW.

    If this is damning with faint praise - so be it!
  • Post #13 - November 25th, 2009, 6:13 pm
    Post #13 - November 25th, 2009, 6:13 pm Post #13 - November 25th, 2009, 6:13 pm
    dansch wrote:
    grits wrote:
    jesteinf wrote:As I mentioned in the other thread, though, the bagels can be problematic.
    Couldn't tell from the other thread--do you think the bagels aren't good to start with or is the issue with toasted bagels that are cold, or both?
    I've never had them toasted, so I can only speak to them as they come directly off of the pile. They're not good; not good at all.

    I actually really like The Bagel. It's not great by any means, but it's good. The service I've received there has always been very warm, the matzo ball soup is good, the tzimmes are delicious (if a bit sweet) and I'm a huge fan of their kugel, except on occasion when the top is a little too dried out (the rest is still good, I just leave the dry parts behind). As far as the challah, it's a little too light and airy to my taste (I like slightly eggier, denser, stringier challah), but it makes great French toast and bread pudding (you can buy it by the loaf to go).

    -Dan


    As Dan said, the bagels are not good. Making it all the more important that the toasted bagels are brought to the table nice and warm.
    -Josh

    I've started blogging about the Stuff I Eat
  • Post #14 - November 25th, 2009, 6:54 pm
    Post #14 - November 25th, 2009, 6:54 pm Post #14 - November 25th, 2009, 6:54 pm
    All this talk of the bagels not being good at The Bagel reminds me of this thread:

    Avoiding What a Restaurant is Named For :D

    =R=
    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain

    Another beer before happy hour to put me in the mood for drinkin', uh huh huh, oh, forget thinkin' --Beaver Nelson

    I find it a matter of note that in New York or Terre Haute, school cookies always seem to be oatmeal --Mr. French
  • Post #15 - November 25th, 2009, 7:44 pm
    Post #15 - November 25th, 2009, 7:44 pm Post #15 - November 25th, 2009, 7:44 pm
    I live two blocks from Frances' and about eight blocks from The Bagel, and when the mood for Jewish deli strikes this non-red meat eater, I take the longer walk and head to The Bagel.

    I've been in Chicago for five years, and while no deli today will equal some of the old delis of my younger days back in Detroit (Irving's in Hamtramck then in Southfield, Bread Basket in Oak Park, Katz's in Oak Park, Sol's on Seven Mile then in Southfield, Leon & Lefkofsky on Seven Mile), The Bagel does a great job serving up traditional Jewish food in a nice atmosphere with usually friendly servers and an attentive owner.

    I've tried and enjoyed the Turkey Pastrami Reuben, Homemade Gefilte Fish, Whitefish, Tuna and Salmon Salads, all the soups, the seasonal Cold Borscht, latkes, Challah and some interesting omelettes off of the back of the menu. A recent 'off the menu' omelette of Turkey Pastrami and Swiss was one of the best breakfasts I have had in Chicago.

    All in all, a solid performer that I am glad to call a local option.
  • Post #16 - November 25th, 2009, 9:12 pm
    Post #16 - November 25th, 2009, 9:12 pm Post #16 - November 25th, 2009, 9:12 pm
    I didn't think the post was that vituperative- I've seen others with more vituperativity, although vituperativeness isn't that common on these boards. Vituperative, yes, vituperative. Now if only there was another word for "use".
  • Post #17 - November 27th, 2009, 12:52 am
    Post #17 - November 27th, 2009, 12:52 am Post #17 - November 27th, 2009, 12:52 am
    The Bagel on Broadway has a few standout dishes...The gefilte fish ( which is good enough that we usually get a batch for holiday meals at home) , and lox and eggs, are two old school favorite I haven't had better in this city (though Barney Greengrass it's not). They also make a nice kasha varnishkes, which I don't think you can even find elsewhere. As noted above the mish mash, mushroom barley soup and chicken in the pot are also good. Sadly, sandwiches were never a strong point. They used to make a Cholent special that was just great, but I haven't seen it offered for a long time.

    At least they know what this stuff is, and aren't just serving up the same permutations of turkey breast and Boar's head pastrami that pass for "Deli" at other places.
    Lacking fins or tail
    The Gefilte fish
    swims with great difficulty.

    Jewish haiku.
  • Post #18 - November 27th, 2009, 1:22 am
    Post #18 - November 27th, 2009, 1:22 am Post #18 - November 27th, 2009, 1:22 am
    At least they know what this stuff is, and aren't just serving up the same permutations of turkey breast and Boar's head pastrami that pass for "Deli" at other places.


    Well said. I think that's why I always like it even when the food's just fair-- it's the real deal. It may not be the best example imaginable of the real deal, but at least it's it.
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  • Post #19 - November 27th, 2009, 12:46 pm
    Post #19 - November 27th, 2009, 12:46 pm Post #19 - November 27th, 2009, 12:46 pm
    Mike G wrote:It may not be the best example imaginable of the real deal, but at least it's it.

    I think this is a great way of putting it. It reminds me that yet another thing I like about The Bagel is you can get tongue there, in the old-fashioned sense of the phrase. Pickled or boiled, on a sandwich or a hot platter. I've had the boiled tongue served both ways. The hot boiled tongue platter is full of thin-sliced tongue served, if you will, "au jus" (in a thin and flavorful beef broth), and it fully satisfies my occasional craving for tongue when the feeling hits.
  • Post #20 - November 27th, 2009, 6:39 pm
    Post #20 - November 27th, 2009, 6:39 pm Post #20 - November 27th, 2009, 6:39 pm
    The Bagel has been my go-to place when I have a taste for a francheezie. Great all-beef dof.
  • Post #21 - November 30th, 2009, 4:54 am
    Post #21 - November 30th, 2009, 4:54 am Post #21 - November 30th, 2009, 4:54 am
    In terms of deli, or more precisely, Jewish-style deli, people in Chicago have the perspective of prisoners of war. No, The Bagel is in no way acceptable at all, simply because it resembles or is a simulacrum of an actual deli. They do not know from deli--- not The Bagel nor their easily jived customers. A deli has *warm* briskets of salted and cured beef sitting on the slicer. That they made in the store, from a distinctive recipe. Not, instead, a Vienna Beef-like product one microwaves: have you ever eaten rubbery overheated microwaved generic pastrami? I have. At The Bagel. Once.

    Without the warm in-house corned beef in the slicer, you basically have a seriously overpriced diner. You can argue that in winter, especially, the soup is the center of the deli experience, but, their soups IMO are way oversalted and nothing special. The What's Cooking? soups are even a little better. The breakfast could be ok, but, the hash browns are below par, and the bagel they serve is on par with Sara Lee. Everything else looks like a decontented and cheap version some temple might put out for a kiddush lunch to punish the sinful. The decor may say real deli, but the food says fake deli. Which, ok, might have a place in a city without even an *average deli*. I used to eat at Eppy's deli; I used to eat the microwaved pre-sliced pastrami, which came with an actually real fruit salad, the same food service cole slaw everybody serves, a fountain drink w/refills, and basically, if you wanted. a cup of soup tossed in practically for free. The whole deal was less than $8 depending on how many of the arbitrary discounts Larry the Jew was willing to give you on a given day. Start adding up what the same thing costs you at The Bagel: $11 for the sammy, $5+ for the soup, $2 for the drink, $5 for a small fruit cup. Does the sandwich even come with a side of slaw? I'll give them the benefit of the doubt. It is still 3x more for the same quality, just to feel you are eating in a "deli". And Subway undercut and put Eppy out of business because it was willing to sell you the same basic crap deli for even less.

    Now, I have a very high threshold for deli food because I have lived in NYC and L.A. But I was even in Cleveland, Ohio over the holiday weekend and for deli, the corner dives and downtown diners are serving 3/4 pound sandwiches of the real thing. I got takeout, twice, from Mr Brisket who was running a deli sandwich $5 special for the weekend including tax. It was the real thing! Compared to the nothing special corner takeout shop in No-Place, Ohio, even Manny's is below average. The Bagel and the other places are for rubes somehow trained to pay double, or even triple what the quality is worth. Imagine a place where someone likes the scrawny bologna-type hot dog, and pays $4 for it--- just cuz he felt like eating a hot dog. That's us when we eat deli in Chicago.
  • Post #22 - November 30th, 2009, 11:14 am
    Post #22 - November 30th, 2009, 11:14 am Post #22 - November 30th, 2009, 11:14 am
    Now that's "vituperative."
    "Strange how potent cheap music is."
  • Post #23 - November 30th, 2009, 11:38 am
    Post #23 - November 30th, 2009, 11:38 am Post #23 - November 30th, 2009, 11:38 am
    This is vicious calumny. It does come with a small cup of slaw.
    Watch Sky Full of Bacon, the Chicago food HD podcast!
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  • Post #24 - November 30th, 2009, 1:18 pm
    Post #24 - November 30th, 2009, 1:18 pm Post #24 - November 30th, 2009, 1:18 pm
    I thought that negative opinions of The Bagel are supposed to be posted in the other thread. Isn't that why we have two? :)
  • Post #25 - November 30th, 2009, 1:42 pm
    Post #25 - November 30th, 2009, 1:42 pm Post #25 - November 30th, 2009, 1:42 pm
    Darren72 wrote:I thought that negative opinions of The Bagel are supposed to be posted in the other thread. Isn't that why we have two? :)


    Personally, I have no problem with Marco’s negative opinion of The Bagel. I do take exception, though, to his characterizing those of us who like it as “easily jived” “rubes.” The things I like at The Bagel I like because I like them, and I assume that’s true for most people who go there. I respect and take at face value Marco’s dislike of the place, so I’d hope he can do the same for those who disagree with him.

    It’s funny, because just yesterday I was considering posting to the Best Things I’ve Eaten Lately thread about the chicken-in-the-pot that we got to-go from The Bagel the other night. It really was the best thing I’ve eaten lately, against some respectable competition. The white meat of the half-chicken was tender and moist, the dark meat done to perfection. The soup the chicken was in included The Bagel's trademark matzo ball (huge yet paradoxically unheavy), kreplach, noodles, carrots, and boiled potato, all delicious. The broth was my Platonic Ideal of chicken broth, loaded with flavor and salted just right. (The Bagel’s chicken soup doesn’t need any more salt, but to my taste, it doesn’t need any less, either, which I appreciate.) The two of us got a dinner out of it, and a lunch the next day. So, four meals altogether, for about $16, or $4 a serving. (I’m getting the price off The Bagel’s website menu, since I don’t remember the transaction itself.) I’d pay considerably more for it--and deliciousness, not price, is why it's the Best Thing I’ve Eaten Lately--but the value certainly doesn’t hurt.
  • Post #26 - November 30th, 2009, 2:04 pm
    Post #26 - November 30th, 2009, 2:04 pm Post #26 - November 30th, 2009, 2:04 pm
    riddlemay wrote:Personally, I have no problem with Marco’s negative opinion of The Bagel. I do take exception, though, to his characterizing those of us who like it as “easily jived” “rubes.” The things I like at The Bagel I like because I like them, and I assume that’s true for most people who go there. I respect and take at face value Marco’s dislike of the place, so I’d hope he can do the same for those who disagree with him.


    I agree. In fact, I found Marco's post a bit over the top. The Bagel isn't in the same league as, say, Katz's. But few places are. If there happens to be a place in Cleveland that serves great brisket sandwiches, that doesn't imply that anyone who likes The Bagel is a rube. The Bagel is pretty good for what it is. Marco mentioned Eppy's, which always struck me as fairly middle-of-the-road quality.
  • Post #27 - November 30th, 2009, 8:52 pm
    Post #27 - November 30th, 2009, 8:52 pm Post #27 - November 30th, 2009, 8:52 pm
    2 points of clarification:

    1. My definition of a deli is a place where meats of high quality and delicacy are served. Not stuff I can easily get at the Jewel.
    2. I do not mind paying a premium for real deli. Nobody does. In fact, that is likely the origin for jewish-style delis having higher prices than, say, greek diners. But only a tragically jived rube pays $12 for a fake deli reuben.

    I can see certain items, such as the above mentioned chicken in the pot, as having value. However, I personally would not pay $16 for it when I thought twice about it at $10 just a few years ago. The Bagel and What's Cooking? both continue to raise prices faster than average, and have now inflated prices well beyond what can be justified given the quality and in the case of The Bagel, the service. In this economy it is offensive. If tacos suddenly fell out of fashion, I would not visit a place charging $16 for 3 mediocre tacos. If thai food somehow was banned by city council and one had to travel to Oak Park to get pad thai, I would not pay $16 for it. Especially not if it was that sickly sweet ketchup sauce stuff you can get stuck with at bad places; and especially not when for $6 most of the time, $7.50 at the top end, one can get fantastic pad thai at the best places.

    If you google Save the Deli you will find a detailed and insightful blog on what Chicago is missing and why. My personal resentment against The Bagel is due in no small part to wanting it to be right, fair and decent---since it is in my 'hood. But they are exploiting nostalgia with the outrageous prices, and not delivering the goods. Clarke's and The Melrose are nearby options without the fake schmaltz, and they are better: which is *really* not saying much.
  • Post #28 - April 23rd, 2014, 3:53 pm
    Post #28 - April 23rd, 2014, 3:53 pm Post #28 - April 23rd, 2014, 3:53 pm
    (chose this thread rather than one of the ones that just happens to mention the bagel, or the infamous one that details how this place earned contempt)

    The LTH North Lunch group (or a sampling of them) dined at the Bagel for lunch.
    We had a great time... but I think the company helped elevate the food, which was merely enjoyable.

    The Mish-Mash soup is listed as "a meal in a bowl" for $9.95... rather, it's 3, delivered in a glass mixing bowl that holds probably a half-gallon of chicken broth, matzoh ball, kreplach and noodles (ordered by two of us, finished by neither).

    Another ordered stuffed cabbage rolls, which looked like exactly what I didn't want (but she seemed to enjoy).

    I had a chocolate phosphate, and as everyone else had already placed drink orders, there was a resounding "D'Oh!" from the group. I followed that with a "Babs" sandwich ($13.95 with potato pancake), subbing pastrami for the corned beef that accompanies the chopped liver.

    My sandwich was well made, but hardly a good value -- Kaufmann's and Max and Benny's are in the same price ballpark, but pile it on higher. The liver, in particular, was practically just a schmear. It was all tasty, well seasoned and tender, though. I have less positive to say about the potato pancake, which was a large, thick, cakelike thing, lacking in crispness and requisite greasiness... but otherwise ok.

    Very pleased to join the LTH Northers for lunch... but I can't say I'll be running back to The Bagel quickly. If someone says, "Let's meet at the Bagel!" I probably would go along, just because there aren't a lot of suburban places to sit down for this sort of stuff, but it's not going to be my first thought.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #29 - April 23rd, 2014, 4:17 pm
    Post #29 - April 23rd, 2014, 4:17 pm Post #29 - April 23rd, 2014, 4:17 pm
    Did anyone order the lox, eggs & onion scramble? I view that as The Bagel's signature dish.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #30 - April 23rd, 2014, 5:17 pm
    Post #30 - April 23rd, 2014, 5:17 pm Post #30 - April 23rd, 2014, 5:17 pm
    JoelF wrote:Very pleased to join the LTH Northers for lunch... but I can't say I'll be running back to The Bagel quickly. If someone says, "Let's meet at the Bagel!" I probably would go along, just because there aren't a lot of suburban places to sit down for this sort of stuff, but it's not going to be my first thought.


    Max & Benny's is the better choice up North, albeit another 15 minutes North.

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