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Laschet's und der Ostpreußischer Bärenfang

Laschet's und der Ostpreußischer Bärenfang
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  • Post #61 - April 4th, 2007, 10:10 pm
    Post #61 - April 4th, 2007, 10:10 pm Post #61 - April 4th, 2007, 10:10 pm
    Ah, Optimator, what a great beer. Who's ready to get Optimated?

    I really do love it!
  • Post #62 - April 5th, 2007, 12:55 pm
    Post #62 - April 5th, 2007, 12:55 pm Post #62 - April 5th, 2007, 12:55 pm
    dicksond wrote:My goulash, at a recent meal was heavenly - rich, spicy, deep. As it happens, I had sampled Goulash at a hungarian place a couple of nights earlier, and it was good. But Laschet's was so much beyond that.


    It should be noted that the Hungarian and Austrian/German takes on goulash are quite different. What's known as gulyás in Hungarian is usually goulashsuppe or "goulash soup" outside the country. Hungarian gulyás, is a brothy paprika-onion-meat-laden soup.

    Austrian and German versions of goulaschsuppes are usually thicker, with more vegetables in the mix (including tomatoes, which are usually absent from the Hungarian version). Basically, the Hungarian version is a clean, red soup with meat and vegetables, and the Austrian and German versions are usually thicker, more brownish in color, and have more vegetables in the mix.

    If you're speaking of the stew that's known as pörkölt in Hungary and goulash elsewhere, the same points apply. Pörkölt is usually a simpler dish made with beef, onions, potato, paprika, and sometimes tomato paste. There's usually no other vegetables to be found. It almost looks like an Indian curry when it's being served, as it's generally sauce and meat.

    Countries outside of Hungary are usually much more liberal with their takes on this dish, throwing in all sorts of herbs, spices, and vegetables that are typically absent from the Hungarian version. And don't even get me started on what is called goulash here in the States.

    Anyhow, I just wanted to elucidate why goulash in a German joint might taste more complex than its Hungarian counterpart: because they are simply prepared differently in their respective countries.

    [/u][/list]
  • Post #63 - April 15th, 2007, 5:02 pm
    Post #63 - April 15th, 2007, 5:02 pm Post #63 - April 15th, 2007, 5:02 pm
    I've pretty much lurked on LTH, enjoying reading the fora but feeling underqualified to post. Hell, I don't even have a digital camera! But, after we went to Laschet's based on reading about it here, the boyfriend said, "you should post on LTHForum".
    My friends visiting from New York said the choice of restaurant for last night was up to me, but then they said they wanted German food. Mirabell is the only German restaurant I've been to since I moved here, and it was okay, but far from memorable. Luckily, based on the posts here, I was able to recommend Laschet's Inn. I can only reiterate what's already been said here before--my boyfriend and our visitors thoroughly enjoyed their sauerbraten and rouladen, the server was able to recommend beers based on our individual tastes and preferences, and they even had something for me (I'm a vegetarian). I had mushroom goulash. Aha, I do have some news--apparently, they are keeping the mushroom goulash and cheese spätzle on the menu even though Lent is over. My friend Jennifer enjoyed the cream herring, and we shared a couple of servings of apple crisp, which made us wonder how they managed to get so much butter into it.
    I ordered a Bärenjäger, and the waiter comped a round for the whole table.
    A lovely experience all the way around.


    Mimi

    **edited to add: Upthread, someone was wondering where to buy Bärenjäger by the bottle. It was a long time ago, but still... I've seen it in the window at Meyer's Delikatessen on Lincoln Avenue.
  • Post #64 - July 30th, 2007, 2:50 pm
    Post #64 - July 30th, 2007, 2:50 pm Post #64 - July 30th, 2007, 2:50 pm
    "Goofy" would be one word to characterize our experience at Laschet's last Thursday. The cute emo waitress - perhaps the same one that denied any knowledge of the cuisine in the other Laschet thread because she's not German - was in constant conversation down at the bar instead of fulfilling our drink wishes, and the all-Latino kitchen rang the "food's-up" bell five times before I actually had to walk over to tell her that our food was ready (and we were sitting right next to the pass-through). We were ceremoniously presented with an empty mustard jar, after which they brought out a giant squeeze bottle from the kitchen. The beer list on the table had no relationship to what was on tap (but the weiss we finally got was quite good and served from a clearly fresh reservoir and clean line). A cloud of 1950's-era unfiltered cigarette smoke hung like a miasma over the non-smoking dining area, and seeing hot wings, Italian Beef, and mozzarella sticks on a neighborhood German menu was a random turnoff (kind of like the spaghetti and meat sauace at Jim Ching Chinese on Randolph).

    On the other hand, the cuisine was quite good. The spaetzle was among the best in the city - firm, buttery, pan-charred on the edges - and the thuringer sausage prodigious in size and flavor (though served incongruously on a large, toasty Turano roll). Portion size was generous even if the prices bore little correlation - my $7.95 sausage sandwich plate weighed about double my comrades' $13.95 smoked pork butt (read: ham) special. The winningest part of the meal was the after-dinner complimentary schapps - great apple and spectacular cherry-peach. We did arrive relatively late for food (9:30, when everybody else was in the bar area), so I'll give the place another shot at an earlier hour to see if it does really still exude a full-blown LTH Neighborhood Award atmosphere, and if there are ever really any Germans there, either in front of or behind the counter.
  • Post #65 - July 30th, 2007, 5:13 pm
    Post #65 - July 30th, 2007, 5:13 pm Post #65 - July 30th, 2007, 5:13 pm
    Santander,

    Laschet's Inn used to be my favorite place in all of the City. I hope it still is. Great authentic German food, drink and atmosphere. I was greatly saddened to learn from former owner Franz Kokott(sp?), that he and his wife Ursula had sold the place several months ago. Though Franz assured me that "everything would stay the same" I wondered for how long. I can remember many (too many?) a night going in for a quick couple of half-liters and a meal only to leave at close having maddenly slammed down many an Edelkirsch(sp?) and revolting pear schnapps with Franz and a few regulars, a few of whom are gone now. It seems from your post that many things are the same - good quality German fare, beer and the free after-dinner shots.

    I was once a frequent guest, averaging probably three times, maybe four, a month a few years ago. I'm only thankful I don't live within walking distance or I'd be 50 lbs. heavier and 10 years closer to death.

    I am fearful that the waitstaff/barstaff has changed. I was and, barring any extreme turnover, still am on a first name basis and/or facial recognition acknowledgment with a few of the servers and barstaff - and I've always liked that about Laschet's.

    Laschet's never seemed toand try and be something that it wasn't - it was plenty successful being true to itself - I hope that hasn't changed.

    As for the "Latin" flavor of the kitchen I can only suspect (hope?) that it is Ursula's understudy Juan who really made the transition from Ursula quite seemless. I believe he is Mexican but a good German chef he is. And although you can call me old-fashioned because I like my German from Ursula, my Chinese from Chen, and my tempura from Tadihito (well, not since he was traded) I cannot deny the fact that Juan knows what he is doing and has carried on the great tradition of Laschet's as the primary place for food of its ilk in Chicago. Laschet's had no equals of its ilk in the City, I hope that's still the case.

    When last I was there was a a nondescript Tues or Wed in late May and the place was packed - vintage Laschet's on that night. I must make it down there this week.

    Here's hoping we don't lose yet another gem.

    Bster
  • Post #66 - July 30th, 2007, 8:26 pm
    Post #66 - July 30th, 2007, 8:26 pm Post #66 - July 30th, 2007, 8:26 pm
    Before people start sounding the death-knell....

    I was at Laschet's for a late-ish dinner on Sat. night.

    Same ol' barstaff, the best darn schnitzel and spaezele that they've ever served me, and a shot of apfel schnapps to cap it all off.

    Best,
    Michael
  • Post #67 - July 31st, 2007, 9:43 am
    Post #67 - July 31st, 2007, 9:43 am Post #67 - July 31st, 2007, 9:43 am
    Have to agree. Took my parents there last Friday evening and had a very good meal of schnitzel, rouladen, and sauerbraten, all washed down with very good beers. Service was friendly, prompt, and accurate.
  • Post #68 - July 31st, 2007, 2:33 pm
    Post #68 - July 31st, 2007, 2:33 pm Post #68 - July 31st, 2007, 2:33 pm
    Good! As I stated, our experience was not bad, merely goofy and disjointed, and I recognized we were there at an unusual time for dinner (9:30 on a Thursday when the crowd and servers were all in the bar). I'll give it another shot soon.
  • Post #69 - July 31st, 2007, 4:36 pm
    Post #69 - July 31st, 2007, 4:36 pm Post #69 - July 31st, 2007, 4:36 pm
    That's a relief!

    I'll be posting an updated food review soon after my next visit!

    Bster
  • Post #70 - July 31st, 2007, 4:59 pm
    Post #70 - July 31st, 2007, 4:59 pm Post #70 - July 31st, 2007, 4:59 pm
    I agree with the previous posts regarding food quality as remaining high since the change in ownership.

    However, the barkeeps are much tighter on controlling boisterous behavior and are quick to cut off those who get too loud.
  • Post #71 - August 22nd, 2007, 3:16 pm
    Post #71 - August 22nd, 2007, 3:16 pm Post #71 - August 22nd, 2007, 3:16 pm
    LTH,

    A superb night at Laschet’s Inn last night confirmed a smooth transition from Franz and Ursula to the new owner, Matt something.

    I started out with a few half-Liters of Jever. Which, really is the German equivalent of very good IPA and the best beer of many on tap at Laschet’s.

    I opted for the Hackepeter/Steak Tartare to start and it was fabulous, as it always is. I only get this about 10% of the time but I might have to adjust that figure upward. Perfect meat, succulent, moist. Good base of rye bread. Nice accompanying chopped raw white onion and capers. Add a little S&P and just ever so slight Maggi seasoning sauce and utter perfection is born. What a wonderful, signature dish.

    For the Second Course I opted for conversation with a few of my long lost Laschet’s Inners several of whom I hadn’t seen in awhile and a few more Jevers.

    After awhile I ordered my entrée: Wiener Schnitzchel a la Holstein. This for me meant a Fried Egg, which had always been my understanding of the definition of “a la Holstein”. But the knowledgeable server told me Fried Egg and Capers is traditional – never heard that one before. They also had Fried Egg and Anchovy available too, not for me this night.

    So, Wiener schnitzel topped with a Fried Egg with fabulous Brown Gravy on the side and the wonderful spaetzel and German potatoes as sides. Among the best meals I’ve had here last night. Just wonderful. Love the egg addition.

    This is my favorite place in Chicago still and second place is not close. I saw several people I knew from visits past whom are my Laschet’s acquaintances. People I originally met there, and only see there and nowhere else. Though a name is not always remembered a face always is and we seem to pick up where we left off last time – no matter how many months, or, is some cases years have gone by.

    What a wonderful night with fantastic food, the best beer in Chicago, and good old friends. There’s no place I’d rather be.

    The changes are subtle – There are a few tables out front on the sidewalk during the Summer and apparently licenses for a modest Bier Garten in the back are being pursued. But the atmosphere, patrons, staff, food, beer and general ambience are the same. Thank God!

    Bster
  • Post #72 - November 11th, 2007, 1:25 pm
    Post #72 - November 11th, 2007, 1:25 pm Post #72 - November 11th, 2007, 1:25 pm
    Hi,

    Yesterday we lunched at Laschet's, inspired by a talk on Milwaukee's Germans. We began with the steak tartare that absolutely hit the spot.

    The French Couple ordered veal and pork shanks, whose sizeable presence reminded everyone of Fred Flintstone's cartoons. Helen had the sauerbraten, which I regretted not ordering after the tasting a sample. I did order their Trixie-Pea recommended fried chicken, substituting spaetzle or french fries plus ordered red cabbage as a sidedish.

    The only thud of the meal was their Laschet's style Rueben. When I inquired what made it Laschet's-style, I was informed they substituted smoked butt for the corned beef. I like smoked butt, which made it very tempting. When my Mom ordered the Laschet's style Rueben, then I could order the fried chicken knowing a taste for the Reuben was in my future.

    I never did try the Reuben, because they made an undisclosed alteration I could not rise above: it was served on a hamburger bun. This was not a grilled sandwich with all the components melting together. This was a smoked butt in a hamburger bun with some sauerkraut and salad dressing. Mom only ate half, then gave up. I'm sorry I just didn't send it back asking for something else. Substituting smoked butt for corned beef would have been just fine, if the remaining sandwich was prepared in the Reuben tradition.

    Otherwise it was a good meal! I will stick to German classics in the future.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
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  • Post #73 - November 12th, 2007, 8:53 am
    Post #73 - November 12th, 2007, 8:53 am Post #73 - November 12th, 2007, 8:53 am
    Cathy2 wrote:Yesterday we lunched at Laschet's, inspired by a talk on Milwaukee's Germans. We began with the steak tartare that absolutely hit the spot.

    C2,

    Coincidentally four of us ended up at Laschet's for rounds of, as the waitress put it, German sushi (Hackepeter) and daily special appetizer of Crispy Sausage Rolls. The Hackepeter really hit the spot possibly due to the pre dinner drinks we had at Weegee's, but then again Laschet's Hackepeter is always delicious. The Crispy Sausage Roll was much lighter than I pictured, more Asian than German, when I commented on this the waitress said the owners mother was Laotian.*

    My Fried Chicken with perfectly crisp fries was terrific, Trixie Pea's theory holds rock solid, Wiener Schnitzel with added egg spot-on, spaetzle, with its hint of nutmeg, almost an art form. I only had a small taste of the Seafood Platter, but one bite of the deep fried bready crab cake was enough to knock it off my ever-try Lashet's list.

    By the way, sorry to have missed the Milwaukee German's talk, Pigmon mentioned it was quite interesting.

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    *This was an off-hand comment by the waitress. I not met the (current) owners or their mom.
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #74 - November 12th, 2007, 9:14 am
    Post #74 - November 12th, 2007, 9:14 am Post #74 - November 12th, 2007, 9:14 am
    Another thumbs up for Laschet's. We went with friends a week ago Friday and all of us were happy with the beer and the food. I had the Wiener schnitzel, and the leftovers the next day, cold, were almost as good.

    It wasn't our first time there, but Laschet's is a place I never would have gone to (despite having driven past it 10,000,000 times--don't you sometimes wish Chicago would invent some new streets?) if not for LTH.
  • Post #75 - December 3rd, 2007, 12:32 am
    Post #75 - December 3rd, 2007, 12:32 am Post #75 - December 3rd, 2007, 12:32 am
    As the weather gets colder and the holidays approach, I can think of few places better to spend time with good friends and family than Laschet's. That warm, old school charm just pulls you in and the perfectly executed stick-to-your ribs German food is worthy of any celebration. This is one of those classic Chicago restaurants which has few rivals, and the staff ensures a wonderful experience.

    So the other night, I visited a packed Laschet's with friends for dinner. Fried chicken is certainly one of the best in town, if not the best -- something I often forget about when visiting Laschet's but which others have properly raved about. And any dish with the spaetzle and sweet and sour cabbage cannot be beaten. On this night, that dish was Rouladen. The moral of the story: great German food is alive and well in Chicago (with no disrespect to another one of my favorites, Resi's).
  • Post #76 - December 3rd, 2007, 1:51 pm
    Post #76 - December 3rd, 2007, 1:51 pm Post #76 - December 3rd, 2007, 1:51 pm
    Have they set up the Christmas decorations and the tree where that first table is in the upper section (immediately to your right as you mount the short light of stairs)?

    The best Christmas Eve dinner I have ever had was at Laschet's a few years ago (probably posted on higher up in this thread), and as a result Laschet's will be associated with the warm glow of Christmas forever more. Sort of what my warm, fuzzy, childhood memories of the Walnut Room suggest, but Fields (Macy's, oy!) has never since delivered.

    Time to go back.
    d
    Feeling (south) loopy
  • Post #77 - December 3rd, 2007, 9:16 pm
    Post #77 - December 3rd, 2007, 9:16 pm Post #77 - December 3rd, 2007, 9:16 pm
    dicksond wrote:Have they set up the Christmas decorations and the tree where that first table is in the upper section (immediately to your right as you mount the short light of stairs)?

    I don't recall seeing any decorations, but I was wrapped up with friends and could have just not been paying attention.
  • Post #78 - July 22nd, 2008, 1:44 pm
    Post #78 - July 22nd, 2008, 1:44 pm Post #78 - July 22nd, 2008, 1:44 pm
    I had the opportunity of going to Lashetts for dinner 2 mos. ago.

    Found the comments here regarding them to be right on.
    Some of the best German food I have ever had outside of my parents making dinner!

    Will definitly go back again sometime. :)
  • Post #79 - July 22nd, 2008, 8:04 pm
    Post #79 - July 22nd, 2008, 8:04 pm Post #79 - July 22nd, 2008, 8:04 pm
    I ate at Laschet's probably about two months ago, and I have to admit I was underwhelmed by the much lauded fried chicken. I wasn't expecting Harold's, but still, it was nothing all that remarkable.

    That's not to say that I didn't eat it... but it didn't seem like something to make a trip for. Is it just a matter of taste? Has it gone down hill? Bad night?

    If I recall correctly, the goulash was pretty dang good.
    Joe G.

    "Whatever may be wrong with the world, at least it has some good things to eat." -- Cowboy Jack Clement
  • Post #80 - July 22nd, 2008, 8:52 pm
    Post #80 - July 22nd, 2008, 8:52 pm Post #80 - July 22nd, 2008, 8:52 pm
    germuska wrote:I ate at Laschet's probably about two months ago, and I have to admit I was underwhelmed by the much lauded fried chicken. I wasn't expecting Harold's, but still, it was nothing all that remarkable.

    That's not to say that I didn't eat it... but it didn't seem like something to make a trip for. Is it just a matter of taste? Has it gone down hill? Bad night?

    Hard to say. I guess that all depends upon what you didn't like about the fried chicken. Was it not crisp? Was it not moist? Or were you just unimpressed with the seasoning (which I do not believe contains as many herbs/spices as most American-style fried chicken recipes). It's certainly different than southern-style, but I've always found the coating to be crisp and the chicken moist and flavorful. One difference I've noted though (and I also recall this from my grandmother's fried chicken) is that they obviously introduce eggs to the crust (and no buttermilk) which makes for a different texture than most American-style recipes, which I find typically rely solely upon buttermilk and flour for the crust.
  • Post #81 - July 22nd, 2008, 8:56 pm
    Post #81 - July 22nd, 2008, 8:56 pm Post #81 - July 22nd, 2008, 8:56 pm
    Joe, I had a similar experience last fall. I remember thinking that nearly $20 ($12.95 I guess, but with the beer it came to about 20) was an awful lot to pay for some very small pieces of chicken (I believe it was a half chicken, so 4 pieces, but tiny) that had hardly any meat on it, and wasn't really special in any way. Of course I am a cheap bastard. If I go back I'll try something else.
    Ronnie said I should probably tell you guys about my website so

    Hey I have a website.
    http://www.sandwichtribunal.com
  • Post #82 - July 22nd, 2008, 9:18 pm
    Post #82 - July 22nd, 2008, 9:18 pm Post #82 - July 22nd, 2008, 9:18 pm
    as the comic artist Lynda Barry might say, "Dang!" what the heck are you guys doing expecting anything from fried chicken in a German joint on the north side of Chicago, I mean, really! My best friend is from Germany and let me tell you, just because you can schnitzel just about any cut of meat, it doesn't mean that there is any precedent for proper Fried Chicken in Germany. Stick to the sausages and the potato pancakes at Laschet's. If you want Harold's, well then, go to Harold's. This strikes me as a weird expectation situation. But I might not know the full story.

    bjt
    "eating is an agricultural act" wendell berry
  • Post #83 - July 22nd, 2008, 9:23 pm
    Post #83 - July 22nd, 2008, 9:23 pm Post #83 - July 22nd, 2008, 9:23 pm
    Well the full story is that the fried chicken has been raved about any number of times on this board, in this thread even, on this page even. So maybe scroll back up a bit before you let loose on us.
    Ronnie said I should probably tell you guys about my website so

    Hey I have a website.
    http://www.sandwichtribunal.com
  • Post #84 - July 22nd, 2008, 10:22 pm
    Post #84 - July 22nd, 2008, 10:22 pm Post #84 - July 22nd, 2008, 10:22 pm
    What I find amusing here is that Harold's is being used by above posters as a standard for quality fried chicken (to which Laschett's ostensibly does not arise). Harold's a pretty low bar. In any event, does Laschett's pan fry or deep fry? I have not tried it. Harold's deep fries. And Harold's is reasonably tolerable, I suppose, for deep-fried chicken (assuming you don't go to one of the Harold's outlets that fries the chicken in the same oil as the fish), and Harold's beats most of the national chains by some small margin (although not by much, especially viz. Popeye's). But the very mode of production of a "deep fried chicken" condemns Harold's to the second or third tier of fried chicken excellence, for this is a dish that MUST be pan fried, by hand, to excel. Asking for excellent deep fried chicken is like asking for a machine-made bespoke suit; getting it is a categorical impossibility. Those who have never eaten pan fried (not deep fried, nor "broasted") chicken can be forgiven for not understanding the distinction; and apparently not many people in northern Illinois have ever had real fried chicken (assuming they've only had the local variety, which is basically equivalent to Shake & Bake), to their loss. And, hey, I never had a pierogi or an Italian beef before I moved to Chicago in 1991, so touche in advance. Perhaps an analogy: deep fried chicken is mass produced chicken; pan fried is artisanal chicken. To deny the difference just doesn't make sense and you know something is wrong, if you've ever eaten pan-fried chicken or worn a tailored suit.
    JiLS
  • Post #85 - July 22nd, 2008, 10:36 pm
    Post #85 - July 22nd, 2008, 10:36 pm Post #85 - July 22nd, 2008, 10:36 pm
    Perhaps an analogy: deep fried chicken is mass produced chicken; pan fried is artisanal chicken.


    Well said. The obvious structural difference was pointed out to me by, I believe, one Mr. Wiviott some time back, that since deep-fried chicken is going to bounce around in the deep fryer, the coating has to be thick enough to withstand that. So there's a distinct armor-plating to deep-fried chicken:

    Image
    Gus's Fried Chicken, Memphis, about as good deep-fried as I've had.

    This means it's not only sturdy enough to be cooked by a deep-fryer, it's sturdy enough to be cooked by a uniformed teenager at a fast food joint.

    Where good pan-fried chicken has a more delicate outer crust:

    Image
    The Hollyhock Hill, Indianapolis.

    It is well worth seeking out such places, rare as they are-- or learning to do it yourself.
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  • Post #86 - July 22nd, 2008, 10:36 pm
    Post #86 - July 22nd, 2008, 10:36 pm Post #86 - July 22nd, 2008, 10:36 pm
    JimInLoganSquare wrote:What I find amusing here is that Harold's is being used by above posters as a standard for quality fried chicken (to which Laschett's ostensibly does not arise). Harold's a pretty low bar. In any event, does Laschett's pan fry or deep fry? I have not tried it.


    Jim-

    Okay. I get from the remainder of your post* that you think pan-frying is superior to deep-frying in creating the perfect fried chicken. Setting aside that argument for the moment, if Laschet's deep-fries (which you admittedly don't know -- neither do I -- I order rouladen at Laschet's), then wouldn't any comparison to Harold's be apt? Nobody was claiming Harold's was the BEST fried chicken, period, the standard, the ultimate, but if both are deep fried, then the comparison would be appropriate, even if the end results were inferior, in your view, in the fried-chicken universe. Thus, any sturm-und-drang about deep frying v. pan frying is besides the point, right? I'm just sayin'. :)

    *continued here:
    JimInLoganSquare wrote:Harold's deep fries. And Harold's is reasonably tolerable, I suppose, for deep-fried chicken (assuming you don't go to one of the Harold's outlets that fries the chicken in the same oil as the fish), and Harold's beats most of the national chains by some small margin (although not by much, especially viz. Popeye's). But the very mode of production of a "deep fried chicken" condemns Harold's to the second or third tier of fried chicken excellence, for this is a dish that MUST be pan fried, by hand, to excel. Asking for excellent deep fried chicken is like asking for a machine-made bespoke suit; getting it is a categorical impossibility. Those who have never eaten pan fried (not deep fried, nor "broasted") chicken can be forgiven for not understanding the distinction; and apparently not many people in northern Illinois have ever had real fried chicken (assuming they've only had the local variety, which is basically equivalent to Shake & Bake), to their loss. And, hey, I never had a pierogi or an Italian beef before I moved to Chicago in 1991, so touche in advance. Perhaps an analogy: deep fried chicken is mass produced chicken; pan fried is artisanal chicken. To deny the difference just doesn't make sense and you know something is wrong, if you've ever eaten pan-fried chicken or worn a tailored suit.
  • Post #87 - July 22nd, 2008, 10:42 pm
    Post #87 - July 22nd, 2008, 10:42 pm Post #87 - July 22nd, 2008, 10:42 pm
    Too many attorneys in this recent discussion.
  • Post #88 - July 22nd, 2008, 10:45 pm
    Post #88 - July 22nd, 2008, 10:45 pm Post #88 - July 22nd, 2008, 10:45 pm
    tatterdemalion wrote:Too many attorneys in this recent discussion.


    Poor MikeG is so maligned, yet he's only married to one . . . :)
  • Post #89 - July 22nd, 2008, 10:52 pm
    Post #89 - July 22nd, 2008, 10:52 pm Post #89 - July 22nd, 2008, 10:52 pm
    aschie30 wrote:
    JimInLoganSquare wrote:What I find amusing here is that Harold's is being used by above posters as a standard for quality fried chicken (to which Laschett's ostensibly does not arise). Harold's a pretty low bar. In any event, does Laschett's pan fry or deep fry? I have not tried it.


    Jim-

    Okay. I get from the remainder of your post* that you think pan-frying is superior to deep-frying in creating the perfect fried chicken. Setting aside that argument for the moment, if Laschet's deep-fries (which you admittedly don't know -- neither do I -- I order rouladen at Laschet's), then wouldn't any comparison to Harold's be apt? Nobody was claiming Harold's was the BEST fried chicken, period, the standard, the ultimate, but if both are deep fried, then the comparison would be appropriate, even if the end results were inferior, in your view, in the fried-chicken universe. Thus, any sturm-und-drang about deep frying v. pan frying is besides the point, right? I'm just sayin'. :)


    Well, yes. My point was that it's funny (sad, not ha-ha) that the folks would glom onto Harold's as the referent for "good" fried chicken, to which Laschett's does not compare or exceed. It's like saying that a big band leader wasn't so hot, because he didn't swing like Glenn Miller; while simply ignoring the existence of Duke Ellington and Count Basie. "Faint praise" to be better than Harold's; "faint criticism" to be worse than Harold's, in that narrowly circumscribed world of excellent fried chicken. I guess my point could be summed up as, "So what that Laschett's isn't better than Harold's; Harold's is not particularly good, either." Contests among the best deep fried chicken are like some fabled National Geographic hunt for the tallest Pygmy.
    Last edited by JimInLoganSquare on July 22nd, 2008, 11:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
    JiLS
  • Post #90 - July 22nd, 2008, 10:57 pm
    Post #90 - July 22nd, 2008, 10:57 pm Post #90 - July 22nd, 2008, 10:57 pm
    JimInLoganSquare wrote:It's like saying that a big band leader wasn't so hot, because he didn't swing like Glenn Miller . . .


    Hmmm. . . I thought we were talking about fried chicken. Now, I don't know which way G. Miller swung, or whether he was a swinger (swunger?), so maybe we're getting off-track here . . . :)

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