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Lincoln's O - Northwest Indiana Food

Lincoln's O - Northwest Indiana Food
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  • Lincoln's O - Northwest Indiana Food

    Post #1 - February 28th, 2007, 2:15 am
    Post #1 - February 28th, 2007, 2:15 am Post #1 - February 28th, 2007, 2:15 am
    ForceReconS4 wrote:I'm a consultant in the NWI area who's been working on a project for a few months. After upteen times of dining in Merrilleville, I decided to do some online searches for local joints in the Hammond area where my project is, and boy am I glad I ran across this blog!

    Including tip, the dinner cost me $35 (I didn't have enough hunger for an appetizer, so if you include that it will easily add on $10 more). So, their prices aren't cheap by any stretch, but based on the number of Illinois license plates and nice cars in the parking lot, I would imagine that the Chicago crowd thinks Freddy's presents a lot more value than, say, a Morton's in downtown!

    Hey Force...
    Welcome to LTH! I'm pleased you liked Freddy's. Prices have gone up, I used to get out of there for under $20 for one of Freddy's "Special" Steaks. (Still wondering what it is!) If you want to eat on the cheap, I'm going to hook you up with the best damn sandwiches you'll probably ever find! (I know, that's a dangerous claim to make). Anyway, a bit south of I-80 off the Kennedy Ave. exit you will find "Lincoln's O". As in original. This place had a cult following in Gary in the 70's that would rival Gene & Jude's or Hot Doug's up here in Chicago.

    Expect a sandwich loaded with plenty of high quality meats, cheeses, and trimmings on fresh bread. Favorites include the Chester Hoagie (ham, cappicola, Genoa salami and provolone cheese with lettuce, tomato, and dressing on Italian bread), the US Steel (roast beef and American cheese on grilled rye bread with tomato, onion and mayo), or the Calumet City Special (melted American cheese on turkey, ham, and bacon with lettuce, tomato and mayo). Add a piece of fresh pie for dessert, and you are good to go.

    Lincoln's O
    2813 Highway Ave.,
    Highland, IN
    (219) 923-4144
    Last edited by Cogito on March 1st, 2007, 12:11 pm, edited 3 times in total.
    What if the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about?
  • Post #2 - February 28th, 2007, 12:58 pm
    Post #2 - February 28th, 2007, 12:58 pm Post #2 - February 28th, 2007, 12:58 pm
    HI,

    Is your Lincoln O any relation to this Lincoln's abandoned location in Gary, IN?

    Photo by ReneG
    Image

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #3 - February 28th, 2007, 11:28 pm
    Post #3 - February 28th, 2007, 11:28 pm Post #3 - February 28th, 2007, 11:28 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:Is your Lincoln O any relation to this Lincoln's abandoned location in Gary, IN?

    In name only. Lincoln's O is the legitimate descendant of the original shop that started the "Lincoln" craze in NWI. But that photo is what prompted these remarks from my post in that thread:
    ----snip
    I grew up in NWI during the period when Gary went from being an upscale, prosperous, attractive, safe place to live, to a slum-ridden, crime-infested ghetto where safety was a pipedream and something that existed only outside the city limits. But for a while, there were quite a few good restaurants to be found, and a small number have managed to survive. One of the phenomena that occurred when Gary started deteriorating, and the successful old-standby places with great food died off and disappeared like the buffalo herds in the late 19th century, was what might be called the concept of "If it worked, copy it." That's what came to mind when I read this thread about the Coney dog places, et. al., in the Gary area.
    ----snip
    You or ReneG mentioned a place called Lincoln's Carryout on 4th Ave. in Gary. This place is the former home of Lincoln Carryouts. (Slight change in name, who would notice)? The Lincoln Carryouts ripoff epitomizes what I was referring to as the "If it works, copy it" phenomena that seemed to be rampant in the Gary area when some of the best places either moved or tanked out. Unfortunately, none of these copy-cat venues can hold a candle to the original. Besides the abandoned one in your photo and the one on 4th Ave., there are to my knowledge, at least 6 other sandwich joints with similar names, leeching off the Lincoln legacy, in Gary, Hobart, Merrillville, Crown Point, Cal City, and Valparaiso. This does not include others that have since tanked out.

    During the 60's and 70's Lincoln Carryouts was undoubtedly the most successful place of its kind in NWI. They were ALWAYS busy, and they ALWAYS delivered an awesome product. Most of the sandwich creations on their menu are said to have been perfected by George Stasinos, the original owner and force behind the Lincoln story.

    They used to have a hot peperoni sub that was to die for. Check them out, you'll be glad you did.
    Last edited by Cogito on March 1st, 2007, 2:53 am, edited 1 time in total.
    What if the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about?
  • Post #4 - February 28th, 2007, 11:42 pm
    Post #4 - February 28th, 2007, 11:42 pm Post #4 - February 28th, 2007, 11:42 pm
    Cogito,

    ReneG can comment better on this phenomena of "if it works, copy it." He has told me of several successful chains on the south side of Chicago, which have near copies with subtle differences in name and signage.

    I look forward to sometime soon going to the original Lincoln: Lincoln O. Do you happen to know what the 'O' means?

    Thanks for the information on the Lincoln O and its copy-cats. There is stuff you just don't know simply passing through.

    Best regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #5 - March 1st, 2007, 2:02 am
    Post #5 - March 1st, 2007, 2:02 am Post #5 - March 1st, 2007, 2:02 am
    Cathy2 wrote:I look forward to sometime soon going to the original Lincoln: Lincoln O. Do you happen to know what the 'O' means?

    I mentioned it above in my other post. Original. Of course! But for some reason, when you go there, their sign just says "Lincoln's".
    Cathy2 wrote:There is stuff you just don't know simply passing through.

    What do you mean?

    BTW, they have a very large selection of sandwiches available. Make sure you pick something that suits your taste that day you happen to go. And the pie is great! Soups used to be great too. I sound like an employee. Enough.
    What if the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about?
  • Post #6 - March 1st, 2007, 11:58 am
    Post #6 - March 1st, 2007, 11:58 am Post #6 - March 1st, 2007, 11:58 am
    hmmmm....Lincoln :) I eat there 3 times a month.

    Actually, there is a photo history of Lincoln in the halllway leading to the restrooms and the rear entrance. They did have one in Cal City, as they have a picture from its opening, but I'm not sure they're running it now.

    10AM-7PM Monday thru Saturday are their hours. They take extended breaks during Christmas and some other holidays like 4th of July.

    Don't go for the atmosphere...go for the pie (and sandwiches) The pies are great....and I don't like pies. If you have a group of people, its much cheaper to buy a whole pie. They'll give you plates and cut it up for you too. The blueberry is my favorite. But do avoid their salads. They are piles of iceberg with toppings.

    Easiest way to get there from 80/94 is to get off at Kennedy Ave South and park in the lot behind the restaurant. If you go at lunch time and they are full, there is a municipal lot that is free across the street.

    Another fine place to eat is Anthony's Cafe, just down the street. Yummy pasta and a great beer list :)

    Debby
  • Post #7 - March 1st, 2007, 1:17 pm
    Post #7 - March 1st, 2007, 1:17 pm Post #7 - March 1st, 2007, 1:17 pm
    Cogito wrote:
    Cathy2 wrote:There is stuff you just don't know simply passing through.

    What do you mean?


    If you live somewhere, then after a while you know the how's and why's things came to be. A perfect stranger who is fresh to the area doesn't know the back story on the Lincolns without a local advising. Easily we could go to the imitator and not be impressed, thus missing the specialness of the original.

    I hope I have explained myself better. If not, then I will try again! :D

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #8 - June 22nd, 2007, 3:03 pm
    Post #8 - June 22nd, 2007, 3:03 pm Post #8 - June 22nd, 2007, 3:03 pm
    I have a lifelong history with Lincoln Carry Outs (LCO). The original shop grew out of modified garage based neighborhood convenience store located on the southwest corner of 4th & Lincoln in Gary (this was before proliferation of 7-11's). It was a family owned operation headed by George and Catherine Stasinos along with their three high school daughters, Carol, Helen, and Bunny (who was double jointed and would amaze me by flipping her arms from front to back with her hands clasped).

    In the summer of '66, LCO grew out of space in the garage and moved into a retrofitted gas station on the southwest corner of 4th and Filmore. I recall hanging around the construction site as a I lived across 4th avenue on 3rd and Pierce. I'm sure I was a pain in the ass but they were always nice to me. Both my brother and sister worked there during their high school years.

    I'm told there was an attempt to francise the LCO name and concept in the late 60's/early 70's. As a result of the Stisinos family's inability to hand over control, Georgia Carry-Outs was opened independently of LCO. This was the first copycat version of LCO. Ironically, the shop was located in a retrofitted gas station in the middle of the Ridge Road split near Georgia Street in Glen Park.

    Fast forward to the late 70's. We have long since moved out of Gary and once I received my drivers license, I would venture to downtown Gary for what was still a local institution. I stuck out like a sore thumb but the food was worth it.

    Not sure of the date, but the Stasinos' decided they wanted to sell. Along came Robert Underwood who purchased the business. As a regular customer, I came to know Bob who informed me that he was going to open a second location in Glen Park which was the former location of Arthur Treacher's Fish and Chips owned by Chuck Wheeler of KFC Fame on 48th & Broadway. I was working at the local Zayre department store in Merrillville, just out of high school not knowing was I was going to do next. But when I heard that a second location was in the works, my head started spinning. I wanted to work at the institution with which I grew up and loved. With no experience but lots of enthusiam, Bob hired me to manage the Glen Park store (this is the site pictured as Lincoln's, Home of the Italian Submarine).

    Now understand, the Stasinos family had a completely different approach to the restaurant biz. Some will question the quality differences but I will defend the practices of Bob's approach. Bob saw the potential to expand and give up some control where the Stasinos' were unable to do so.

    I was involved with the growth of LCO with the addition of two stores, Pine Island and Hobart. I truely was passionate of my work at LCO but after three years, I had the opportunity to go back to school and get an Electrical Engineering degree from Purdue. After three years in school, primarily frequenting the Hobart LCO location of which I lived only a few blocks, I moved away only to get my LCO fix a couple times a year.

    I tried my best to keep up with Bob on my semi-annual visits, but things do happen and we lost touch. I would hear that locations sold/closed and his son Buzz took over the Hobart location. I sadly admit, the food quality has gone way down. I generally go with the Steelworker w/pepper cheese. The Lincoln Pepper Burger on the sub roll still has a taste that has not been duplicated. Must be the special sauce (of which I know the recipe).

    Now getting back to the "O Lincoln's". When the Stasinos' sold in the late 70's, they couldn't retire. They opened a location just across the state line (due to contactual reasons) in Calumet City, Illinois near the Ford plant. My details are a little weak as I never visited that location. Currently, "O Lincoln's" in Highland is operated by Helen and her mother, Catherine. I had an opportunity to go there and I introduced myself as 30 years have past since I last saw them. After a short visit, given they were very busy at 2:00 pm which was well after the normal lunch rush, I sat down to have an incredible sandwich. The prices were ridiculously low and quality was unparalleled. I am told by my brother-in-law, a regular, that everything is exceptional. He happens to be partial to the eggplant sandwich.

    I hope this offers a little clarity on the history of Lincoln Carry Outs.
    Last edited by KMAC on June 28th, 2007, 1:07 am, edited 6 times in total.
  • Post #9 - June 22nd, 2007, 4:46 pm
    Post #9 - June 22nd, 2007, 4:46 pm Post #9 - June 22nd, 2007, 4:46 pm
    HI,

    Rene G and I have stood in front of the O Lincoln's in Highland, IN. It was Sunday, thus closed tighter than a drum. I've been wanting to back ever since because simply from the street, it makes an impact. If you were to casually glance at O'Lincoln, you don't think submarine shop. The front window has very nice drapes, Grecian columns with gilded framed photos of submarines and pies. Until you see the food pictures, the exterior is 1960's era women's dress shop.

    Thank you very much on the Lincoln Carry OUt and O'Lincoln history. I hope you will contribute more on NW Indiana: its history as well as your contemporary opinions.

    BTW - do you have any comments on John's Pizza formerly of Calumet City? If yes, then check this thread and advise your comments.

    Welcome to LTHforum!

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #10 - June 25th, 2007, 12:10 pm
    Post #10 - June 25th, 2007, 12:10 pm Post #10 - June 25th, 2007, 12:10 pm
    maybe its old news but with all of this lincoln's talk i saw they closed the lincolns in valparaiso.it has been replaced with a lttle tokyo which is suppposed to be a sushi bar/japenese steak restaurant.thats all i know.
  • Post #11 - June 25th, 2007, 5:01 pm
    Post #11 - June 25th, 2007, 5:01 pm Post #11 - June 25th, 2007, 5:01 pm
    trudie wrote:maybe its old news but with all of this lincoln's talk i saw they closed the lincolns in valparaiso.it has been replaced with a lttle tokyo which is suppposed to be a sushi bar/japenese steak restaurant.thats all i know.

    If you want genuine Lincoln's food, you have to go to the place in Highland. All the rest are pretenders, you might as well go to a Subway.
    What if the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about?
  • Post #12 - June 25th, 2007, 5:06 pm
    Post #12 - June 25th, 2007, 5:06 pm Post #12 - June 25th, 2007, 5:06 pm
    Cogito,

    Did you happen to read this? Lincoln submarine history.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #13 - June 26th, 2007, 4:11 pm
    Post #13 - June 26th, 2007, 4:11 pm Post #13 - June 26th, 2007, 4:11 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:Cogito,

    Did you happen to read this? Lincoln submarine history.

    Regards,

    Yes, the OP is a lot kinder to the Lincoln copycats that I would be. Those other places grossed me out to the point where I couldn't even bring myself to order anything. The quality of food at the Lincoln's O is a mile above any of those other also-rans. It's an insult to speak of them in the same breath. Am I making myself clear?
    What if the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about?
  • Post #14 - June 28th, 2007, 1:39 am
    Post #14 - June 28th, 2007, 1:39 am Post #14 - June 28th, 2007, 1:39 am
    You must understand that this family has the strongest work ethic imaginable and are in the store every working hour, 6 days a week. In addition, I've only known one non-family member to operate the cash register on a regular basis. She was Anita Minor, who stayed on with Bob Underwood at both the Gary and Glen Park locations.

    This should explain the needed day of rest...
  • Post #15 - August 8th, 2007, 6:44 pm
    Post #15 - August 8th, 2007, 6:44 pm Post #15 - August 8th, 2007, 6:44 pm
    Lincoln's is an interesting place, sort of a cross between a ladies' tea room, a Midwestern cafeteria and a fast food restaurant.

    Image

    As you can see it's very pink.

    The menu is extensive, with special depth in sandwiches and pie.

    Image

    With names like Bunny Girl, Toledo, US Steel Special, Dagwood and Chester Hogie that go back to their earliest days in business, perusing the menu and ordering is fun. I went with Cathy2 and the ladies after the mushroom talk so we were able to try a pretty good cross section of the menu. Prices are remarkably low.

    Chester Hogie
    Image

    One of Lincoln's signature sandwiches. I was somewhat disappointed in the quality of the cold cuts but really can't complain given its $3 price. I've had smaller and worse sandwiches for more than double the price.

    Stromboli
    Image

    This is a pretty good sandwich, not the greatest sausage but a steal at $2.99. We tried a similar eggplant sandwich (not pictured) that was my favorite of the day. I liked the way everything melded together into a sticky, messy whole.

    Michigan Red Hot
    Image

    Image

    This startling assemblage of dual hot dogs, chili with beans, tomato, onion, relish, pickles and mustard had me wary but I have to admit it wasn't bad. I don't think I've enjoyed crappy frankfurters so much since I was a kid.

    Philly Steak
    Image

    At $4.25 the Philly steak is their most expensive item. Not world class, a little underseasoned, but nothing to be ashamed of.

    Image

    As their window display suggests, Lincoln is known for their pies. At the risk of sounding like a broken record, they're generally quite good, not great, but an excellent value at $1.49 for a generous slice or $5.99 for a whole pie.

    Image

    The cherry (at left) was the unanimous favorite, really a nice slice of pie. Eleven varieties were available, all made in house. I thought we showed admirable restraint by only ordering cherry, walnut, peach, strawberry-cheese, Hawaiian and chocolate (my order of preference).

    I can easily understand why Lincoln has remained popular for so many years. A large tasty sandwich, slice of pie, civilized surroundings, and change back from your Lincoln, not a bad formula at all.

    After your meal be sure to check out the stunning snakes, lizards and fish (including rays) at Reptile Emporium, a few doors east. Seeing those snakes in their beautiful new skins made me want to molt.

    Lincoln's O
    2813 Highway Av (just east of Kennedy)
    Highland IN
    219-923-4144
  • Post #16 - August 8th, 2007, 7:06 pm
    Post #16 - August 8th, 2007, 7:06 pm Post #16 - August 8th, 2007, 7:06 pm
    Thanks ReneG (and the ladies of the mushroom club). You have just put Lincoln's O on my list for next week.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #17 - August 10th, 2007, 2:45 am
    Post #17 - August 10th, 2007, 2:45 am Post #17 - August 10th, 2007, 2:45 am
    ReneG, you come upon some of the oddest places; that double wiener sandwich looks strangely attractive.

    PS. There's an imposter out there:
    http://www.yelp.com/user_details?userid ... qDM7z17jEg
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #18 - August 10th, 2007, 8:02 am
    Post #18 - August 10th, 2007, 8:02 am Post #18 - August 10th, 2007, 8:02 am
    David Hammond wrote:PS. There's an imposter out there:
    http://www.yelp.com/user_details?userid ... qDM7z17jEg


    Two different worlds blissfully unaware of each other.
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #19 - September 24th, 2008, 10:52 pm
    Post #19 - September 24th, 2008, 10:52 pm Post #19 - September 24th, 2008, 10:52 pm
    Took a ride thru NW Indiana for work today and did some good eating. I had been to the Lincoln Take-Out's in Hobart and when we were with my buddy I told him we were right by this place I went too and poof it popped out of nowhere.Then when we were headed back we came across another Lincoln in Calumet City. I had known all along I read about this place somewhere and the name Lincoln and subs in NW Indiana all together rang a bell. For now ons im just going to assume it was on here where I learned about something because it always ends up being that way.

    Image
    Lincoln carry outs in Hobart, IN

    Image
    we were told that the steelworkers special and the bunny girl are two of the favorites

    Image
    Quite a menu selection

    Image
    Steelworkers Special (L) and Bunny Girl (ham & melted swiss served on French bread with mayo lettuce and tomato)

    Image
    according to the Post tribune the "Steelworkers" special is the best sandwich in NW Indiana (grilled roast beef, American cheese, lettuce, tomato and onion on grilled beefsteak rye)

    Would of tried a Lincoln burger (double jumbo burger on French bread with all the trimmings) but we had already ate them at Miner Dunn (below) and TAB.

    Image
    picked up some Peerless chips which I also knew I read about on here

    Also hit up Miner Dunn for one of the better burgers Ive had this year, amazing fries too. I will 110% be back here, loved this place.

    Image
    C'mon you know just by looking at the sign that its good.

    Image
    MD deluxe special (cheeseburger with ketchup, relish, onions) their amazing thin fresh cut fries and a orange sherbert.

    On the way back what do you know we hit up another Lincoln sandwich shop in NW Indiana.

    Image
    In Calumet City

    Image
    very similar and when my buddy asked if they had any relation to the one in Hobart we got a "arrggh no"

    Image
    I spotted that they serve "Toledo" sandwiches. It was too late as they were closing and we were the last to order.

    Image
    My buddy went with a Chicken teriyaki, not bad at all for $2.99

    Im going to re-educate myself on this thread later but I thought I would share the pics now. The dining spots still around that survived time really have that old school feel, thats what I love about the area. Anyone else been to these spots? I like all of them and would put the Lincoln in Hobart as better taken care of and less grimey than the one in Calumet, but ill be back to both. Ones things for sure these places have all been around and not much has changed about them or the food I assume. I love it.

    Lincoln Carry-Out's
    1002 Lincoln St
    Hobart, IN 46342
    (219) 942-2113

    Miner Dunn
    8940 Indianapolis Blvd
    Highland, IN 46322
    Phone: (219) 923-3311

    Lincoln's Tasty Sandwiches
    1458 Sibley Blvd
    Calumet City, IL 60409
    (708) 891-3240
  • Post #20 - September 25th, 2008, 6:52 am
    Post #20 - September 25th, 2008, 6:52 am Post #20 - September 25th, 2008, 6:52 am
    DaBeef, read the first page of this thread. This is the only real "Lincoln's." The places you went to are pale comparisons that do not hold a candle to the real McCoy.

    Lincoln's O
    2813 Highway Ave.,
    Highland, IN
    (219) 923-4144
    What if the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about?
  • Post #21 - October 20th, 2008, 4:42 pm
    Post #21 - October 20th, 2008, 4:42 pm Post #21 - October 20th, 2008, 4:42 pm
    I was going down the Bormann Xpwy last week and at the Kennedy Ave. exit my car suddenly veered onto the southbound exit, and somehow I found myself at Lincoln's sandwich shop in Highland. I had not been there for a few years, so I was hoping that nothing had changed for the worse. I am happy to report that other than enlarging their menu, everything is as good as I remembered it to be.

    I had a Philly steak sandwich for lunch and it was great. Grilled ribeye steak with grilled onions, tomato, green pepper, and mozzarella cheese. It came on French bread, which was good, but I could not identify the baker. The thing that always impressed me about Lincoln's is the high quality of the ingredients they use. The steak was tender, tasty, and not overcooked. It's a steal at only $4.50. I topped it off with a slice of coconut cream pie for $1.50.

    I took a few sandwiches home for later. A Chester Hoagy: Ham, cappicola, Genoa salami, and provolone with lettuce, tomato, onion, and dressing on French bread. This is my favorite Italian sub at Lincoln's, and only $3.25! I also got a US Steel: Roast beef, cheese, etc., on grilled rye for $4.25. Excellent tasting beef.

    They now have a huge sandwich menu, over 70 varieties, and also offer soups, salads, and pie. Everything is a steal. If you're ever in the area, you owe it to yourself to check this place out. Their hours are something like Monday through Friday from 11 to 7. They are open Saturday but I think they close a little earlier.
    What if the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about?
  • Post #22 - October 21st, 2008, 9:56 am
    Post #22 - October 21st, 2008, 9:56 am Post #22 - October 21st, 2008, 9:56 am
    I live a couple blocks from Lincoln's. Most of their sandwiches are on that delicious French bread. I've never bothered to ask who the baker is, but I should the next time I stop in. The menu has always been huge so it's hard to tell if it gets bigger. (They'll be running out of room on the walls soon, though)

    Lincoln's
    2813 Highway Avenue
    Highland, in 46322-1630
  • Post #23 - October 21st, 2008, 11:59 am
    Post #23 - October 21st, 2008, 11:59 am Post #23 - October 21st, 2008, 11:59 am
    Llama, do you remember their original steak sub? When did they take it off the menu? It had lots of grilled steak with grilled onions and A-1 Sauce on French bread. I actually prefer it to the Philly steak, but they're both damn good.
    What if the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about?
  • Post #24 - October 21st, 2008, 1:04 pm
    Post #24 - October 21st, 2008, 1:04 pm Post #24 - October 21st, 2008, 1:04 pm
    I know I've been with someone who's ordered it within the past year. I bet they'd make it if you asked.

    Sometimes I think they've taken something off the menu, but someone with a keener eye than me spots it in a different position.
  • Post #25 - October 21st, 2008, 1:45 pm
    Post #25 - October 21st, 2008, 1:45 pm Post #25 - October 21st, 2008, 1:45 pm
    Hi,

    I think Lincoln;s with its interesting history, unique dining room and sandwiches, could be a GNR someday. Keep going, talk about those delicious sandwiches and keep up the dialogue. I have been there only once and really want to get back there sometime soon.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #26 - October 21st, 2008, 3:24 pm
    Post #26 - October 21st, 2008, 3:24 pm Post #26 - October 21st, 2008, 3:24 pm
    Llama wrote:I know I've been with someone who's ordered it within the past year. I bet they'd make it if you asked.

    Sometimes I think they've taken something off the menu, but someone with a keener eye than me spots it in a different position.

    They took my fave sammie, a peperoni sub, off the menu. And when I was in there last week I asked Catherine (the owner) about it, and she said she remembered the sandwich from their previous store, but didn't remember how to make it. Honestly, she's so old I'm surprised she can still remember how to find the restaurant everyday. Probably working and staying busy keeps her alert.
    What if the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about?
  • Post #27 - November 18th, 2008, 5:33 pm
    Post #27 - November 18th, 2008, 5:33 pm Post #27 - November 18th, 2008, 5:33 pm
    Cogito wrote:DaBeef, read the first page of this thread. This is the only real "Lincoln's." The places you went to are pale comparisons that do not hold a candle to the real McCoy.

    Lincoln's O
    2813 Highway Ave.,
    Highland, IN
    (219) 923-4144


    Well I listened and I am glad I did. You were not lying thats for sure, not that I thought you were. I have now been to three different Lincoln's and to quote Cogito one more time "The places you went to are pale comparisons that do not hold a candle to the real McCoy"

    Image

    This picture from across the street kind of sums up how nondescript Lincolns is, if you were a passerby you would never think that this is a sandwich place. When you look at it from the outside it looks as though it is either a wedding banquet hall or a wedding tailor or flower shop or something of that nature. Then when you step in the first thing that came to my mind was that I felt like I was at a hospital cafeteria. Its a large pink dining room with old school tables and chairs with fake flowers on each table and then the ordering station in the very back.

    Just like the previous two Lincoln's I visited, they had all the sandwiches described on some paper taped onto the wall. Its really sad how excited I was when I finally found this place, I had been looking around for it every time I was in the area and never had the address. This time even with the address, google text didnt recognize it so I had to find it on my own.

    Image
    I believe this was the Crisper, an Italian piled with meats, cheese and veggies. Notice how big these sandwiches are? They are just $3.95 each and I though we were getting sandwiches with the portions of the other Lincolns...no sir. This is the real McCoy.

    Image
    Look at this Bunny Girl special compared to the one I got in Hobart (upthread) The meats are triple the amount and much better quality and the price is lower.

    Image
    The Sibley special was a loaded sandwich consisting of turkey, bacon, lettuce, tomato, hard boiled egg and oil.

    Image
    Portions for the price are almost unreal at the Real Lincoln's. This is half of a Lincoln burger...what I think were four all beef patty's with special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles onions on a French bread bun. But this was so much better than a Big Mac. When did Lincolns come up with this burger? if it was before 1968, McDonald's ripped them off.

    Image
    I really enjoyed this sandwich, burger or whatever you want to call it.

    Lincoln's is the real deal, thats for sure. I see a visit from Diner, Drive In's & Dives in their near future. It really is a diamond in the rough.

    Cathy2 wrote:Da Beef,

    I'm tickled you are enjoying the wonders of NWI as much as I have over the last few years. I noticed you didn't mention the name of the place that serves both tamales and pierogies. I'm hoping to get over there for a full day of touring sometime soon. I'd love to follow in your footsteps to that place.

    All the best,


    Cathy2,

    I have been going to a longtime frinds house in Michigan City over the summer for over 15 years now. When I got my license and we came and went ourselves, I always loved taking the South Shore and driving thru all the neighborhoods in the area all the way up or back. I found alot of info on places to check out from posts on here so thanks for the rec's. I have been going up to the area for work the past few Mondays and finally stopped at the Whiting Pierogi & Tamale store after driving by it the past few years. Hope this helps.

    Image
    Located on Indianapolis right across the street from the Dunkin Donuts that is right in the middle of Pierogi fest.

    Image Image
    Its a small store that has six of these freezers pictured above on the left filled with various pierogi's, dumplings, blintzes, knish, pierogi bombers and all that stuff including deli goods like meats and salads. They have over 40 types of pierogi according to the menu. They also have pork, beef, chicken, hot pork, spicy chicken, cheese and jalapeno and bean & cheese tamales available hot by the dozen and frozen. You can mix and match all the items and save the more you by. Its a place I fell in love with upon entering. I got some frozen pierogi to go and had to pass on the tamales b/c it was just me and a friend and we were on a different mission. I will say by the smell and feel and look of the tamal's, they seemed and smelled pretty damn good.

    Northwest Indiana has two native fast food joints with various locations...Schoops and Zel's.

    Image Image
    A Mickey burger from Schoops and a chili cheese fries from Zel's

    Image
    I also made it to John's pizzeria last night on my way home around 7:30 and it was doing good business for a Monday, quite a few family's and people enjoying their pizza's.

    Image
    I thought Cathy2 and ReneG's summary and description was spot on. I enjoyed everything about this place including the pie. I tried a loose meat sausage and give it the thumbs up and on my way out a father and son had a onions and sausage delivered that smelled so good it had me thinking about getting a small to go.

    There is no denying that NW Indiana is still rich in food gems that have withstood the downfall of the area. Not much has changed out there. If you need an excuse other than just the food, the gas is cheap and the Cabela's in Hammond is still one of the funnest stores to shop at in the world.

    Image Image

    Im not a big hunter or outdoorsman and I still love it. They have everything you need to deep fry your turkey this Thanksgiving season and all sorts of fun BBQ and kitchen toys like dutch ovens and smokers and marinades and rubs for the holiday season. I had been there four times previous to yesterday and just saw that they have a general store for the first time. Ive been to Mackinaw Island and their fudge shops but I have never seen so many different flavors of fudge.

    Quick Question: has anybody ever been to or heard of "The Lure Hamburgers" in Gary? I had never seen this old school looking sit down burger joint until yesterday but I was stuffed as could be and on my way to John's so even though I almost made a hard right into the lot I had to pass. The only mentions of it on the internet are in the comments section on stories about Gary scattered throughout the internet. People reminisce about it on their comments as if it is gone but its still there and open but there are no listings that I can find. I think it was on route 20 near the minor league baseball stadium.

    Lincoln's O
    2813 Highway Ave.,
    Highland, IN
    (219) 923-4144

    Whiting Pierogi & Tamale
    1548 Indianapolis BLVD
    Whiting, IN
    219-659-2222

    The Original John's Restaurant & Pizzeria
    2356 Schrage Av (at Indianapolis Blvd & 124th St)
    Whiting IN
    219-659-1046
    Sun-Thu 10:30-11, Fri-Sat 10:30-12

    Cabela's
    7700 Cabela Drive
    Hammond, IN 46324
    (219) 845-9024

    The Lure Hamburgers
    Gary, IN
    ????????????????
  • Post #28 - November 18th, 2008, 5:56 pm
    Post #28 - November 18th, 2008, 5:56 pm Post #28 - November 18th, 2008, 5:56 pm
    HI,

    Did Lincoln O's still have the gold framed photos of the sister and father who had passed on? I completely agree the pink colors, white Grecian pedestals in the front window with gold framed photos of sandwiches just seems a bit off. A 1960's dress shop, wedding chapel or wedding dress store really sums up the decor. No hint of the sandwich shop residing behind the front window display.

    Was The Lure Hamburgers in Gary, IN by the stadium? On that east-west road we have seen quite a number of fast tood restaurants who gave up their ghost either just recently or long ago. I remember one soul food restaurant where at a glance I was convinced had closed forever. Rene G disagreed. He was right because as we passed a door was open with an event like a wedding was in full swing.

    Good thing you went yesterday and not today, because that area had at least 7 inches of snow earlier today with more on the way.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #29 - November 18th, 2008, 7:57 pm
    Post #29 - November 18th, 2008, 7:57 pm Post #29 - November 18th, 2008, 7:57 pm
    DaBeef, I'm glad you finally got hooked up at the true source for Lincoln's. They simply blow away the pretenders, eh? Did you check out any soup, it's usually pretty good. On my last visit a coupla weeks back, I must say that I was disappointed to see that some of their sandwiches had switched over to those Gonnella French Rolls instead of real French bread. Those rolls don't cut it. I complained, I hope they listen.

    The Lure has been around forever also. I ate there a few times a long time ago. It didn't strike me as anything uber-special, but OK.
    What if the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about?
  • Post #30 - November 19th, 2008, 6:55 pm
    Post #30 - November 19th, 2008, 6:55 pm Post #30 - November 19th, 2008, 6:55 pm
    Cathy, I have never been to The Lure in Portage, only the one on Rt 12/20 that Rene referred to, and it has been at least 15 years. I do not when that one closed.

    Also, I want to urge anyone who goes to Lincoln's in Highland to complain about those Gonnella sandwich rolls that they have started using on some of their sandwiches. They are BAD, and Lincoln's should know better. They do not hold a candle to the French bread.
    What if the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about?

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