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Best Korean BBQ
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  • Post #91 - July 13th, 2009, 2:39 pm
    Post #91 - July 13th, 2009, 2:39 pm Post #91 - July 13th, 2009, 2:39 pm
    ucjames wrote:
    Chitown B wrote:been to San Soo with friends who go there all the time. Very diner-like, rude waitresses but it's a bit funny how bad they are. good food, i'd suggest it.


    I've been to San Soo Gab San at least half a dozen times, and never had a rude waitress.

    And yes, the food is good.


    Must've just been bad luck. I guess less rude and more "here you go, see you." Nothing that put me off, just weird.
  • Post #92 - July 13th, 2009, 2:44 pm
    Post #92 - July 13th, 2009, 2:44 pm Post #92 - July 13th, 2009, 2:44 pm
    Thanks to a scheduling SNAFU, we unexpectedly ended up having an early dinner at SSGS on Saturday afternoon, just the wife, the 7-year-old, and me. The food was top-notch. My wife had the yukgae jang (a spicy beef soup), and it was richly flavored and spicy. I don't know how she can eat that on a hot summer's day. The galbi was so good that grilled up the bones and gnawed the meat off them. The quality and quantity of the panchan blows me away. Our favorite this time was a sour/sweet transparent kinky noodle (that's a technical term).
  • Post #93 - July 13th, 2009, 4:45 pm
    Post #93 - July 13th, 2009, 4:45 pm Post #93 - July 13th, 2009, 4:45 pm
    Panther in the Den wrote:We also followed the recommendation of having a bottle of the potato liquor (similar to vodka and served ice cold (Chum-Churum?))

    PitD,

    Soju not chum-churm, but that's a pretty cool name nonetheless.

    Far as service/waitress at SSGS goes, I've been dozens of times over the years and had the full spectrum, sweet, friendly, mean, bitter, overly attentive, totally ignore, pretty, frightening to look at, grandmotherly, slutty, loud, quiet, brash, bold, reserved..................

    One constant, food is always good to very good and, in general, service is fine to experience enhancing.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Sauce on the side, always, implied, axiomatic..........never a doubt, BBQ sauce without.

    Low & Slow
  • Post #94 - July 13th, 2009, 7:58 pm
    Post #94 - July 13th, 2009, 7:58 pm Post #94 - July 13th, 2009, 7:58 pm
    "Cheo-um-cheo-rum" (not sure what is the correct romanized spelling) is a brand of sochu. It literally translates to "like the first time." If you like them, you can usually buy sochu at any Korean market (H-mar, Assi, etc) for anywhere between 1.99-4.99 a bottle. It's a very cheap drink.

    Hwa
  • Post #95 - July 13th, 2009, 8:27 pm
    Post #95 - July 13th, 2009, 8:27 pm Post #95 - July 13th, 2009, 8:27 pm
    einberliner wrote:"Cheo-um-cheo-rum" (not sure what is the correct romanized spelling) is a brand of sochu. It literally translates to "like the first time." If you like them, you can usually buy sochu at any Korean market (H-mar, Assi, etc) for anywhere between 1.99-4.99 a bottle. It's a very cheap drink.

    Hwa

    Ha, ha... now that you spelled it out, I do remember that brand being advertised somewhere on my table the last time I was there. I thought it was a pretty cute name... well, in Korean, that is. :P
  • Post #96 - July 13th, 2009, 8:54 pm
    Post #96 - July 13th, 2009, 8:54 pm Post #96 - July 13th, 2009, 8:54 pm
    When writing my post I dashed down to the freezer where we had the remains of the bottle we had and Chum-Churum is the only English words on the bottle. :)

    Thanks for the reminder that Soju is the real name.

    Either way it turned up the enjoyment of the evening a notch.
    "Make Lunch, Not War" ~ Anon
  • Post #97 - September 13th, 2009, 10:35 pm
    Post #97 - September 13th, 2009, 10:35 pm Post #97 - September 13th, 2009, 10:35 pm
    Before the Bears game today Mrs. Trpt and I went to Hae Woon Dae. It's a 12th anniversary special, all drinks half price until midnight for a "short time." This means Miller Lights for $1.50, Heineckens for $2.00, soju for $5.00. Food great as always, and back in time for kickoff.
    trpt2345
  • Post #98 - May 4th, 2010, 5:39 pm
    Post #98 - May 4th, 2010, 5:39 pm Post #98 - May 4th, 2010, 5:39 pm
    Last night, RAB and I went to Kang Nam for the first time in months, and for the first time, we didn't order barbecue. We've moved apartments, and having not yet unpacked the kitchen, we're enjoying many of the restaurants in our new neighborhood. We were thinking about another trip to Dawali (which has already claimed first place in our restaurant rotation). But when RAB suggested Kang Nam, and I thought about dol sot bi bim bop for dinner, we changed our minds and went for Korean.

    I really liked, but didn't quite love, the dol sot bi bim bop. The flavor profile was great and the rice layer crisped up nicely. The problem was that there wasn't sufficient rice, so the balance was off. And, the rice was slightly mushy. I still enjoyed the dish. The accompanying bowl of soup, which was appreciated but completely unnecessary given the vast quantities of food, was spicy and had a nice slight funk.

    RAB ordered the kimchee chigae soup and was happy. He ordered it spicy, and commented that they got it just right - - pleasantly spicy, but without being so hot that it would be a challenge to eat. He thinks it may be tough for him to order anything else there.

    Panchan was substantial. None of the offerings was mind blowing, but there were about a dozen of them and the serving was more than ample for two.

    After a slow start (can we order, please?), service was very friendly and attentive. We were asked several times if everything was ok and our water glasses were never empty.

    Fully satisfied, out the door, for $20 plus tip. I think Kang Nam, too, will be in our regular rotation.

    Ronna
  • Post #99 - May 4th, 2010, 5:54 pm
    Post #99 - May 4th, 2010, 5:54 pm Post #99 - May 4th, 2010, 5:54 pm
    REB wrote:Yeah, it was the non-bellied pork - - it had bones. Our server wouldn't let us order the belly, so it really wasn't an option.


    :?:
    As a mattra-fact, Pie Face, you are beginning to look almost human. - Barbara Bennett
  • Post #100 - May 4th, 2010, 6:00 pm
    Post #100 - May 4th, 2010, 6:00 pm Post #100 - May 4th, 2010, 6:00 pm
    Suzy Creamcheese wrote:
    REB wrote:Yeah, it was the non-bellied pork - - it had bones. Our server wouldn't let us order the belly, so it really wasn't an option.


    :?:
    I was answering a question about a pork dish at SSGS. Is that what you want to know?

    Please don't ask me to relive my single SSGS experience, one of the worst restaurant experiences I've ever had.

    Ronna
  • Post #101 - May 4th, 2010, 6:48 pm
    Post #101 - May 4th, 2010, 6:48 pm Post #101 - May 4th, 2010, 6:48 pm
    REB wrote:
    Suzy Creamcheese wrote:
    REB wrote:Yeah, it was the non-bellied pork - - it had bones. Our server wouldn't let us order the belly, so it really wasn't an option.


    :?:
    I was answering a question about a pork dish at SSGS. Is that what you want to know?

    Please don't ask me to relive my single SSGS experience, one of the worst restaurant experiences I've ever had.

    Ronna


    Ha, I won't. I was just wondering about not being allowed to order a dish -that seems very strange.
    As a mattra-fact, Pie Face, you are beginning to look almost human. - Barbara Bennett
  • Post #102 - May 4th, 2010, 8:49 pm
    Post #102 - May 4th, 2010, 8:49 pm Post #102 - May 4th, 2010, 8:49 pm
    Suzy Creamcheese wrote:Ha, I won't. I was just wondering about not being allowed to order a dish -that seems very strange.

    I haven't had it happen in while, but it isn't a novel situation. The worst thing that can happen is to be a food adventurer arriving shortly after a peavish non-adventurer has been there. The type who want to order odd things, declare they don't like it and want the dish wiped from the invoice.

    I admit to these front of the house people there is always a chance I may not like it. I will pay for my selection no matter how I may feel later. It does help to soften their position by assuring payment for services rendered.

    I have also returned to the very same restaurant the next day to order the item previously refused and got it.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #103 - May 4th, 2010, 9:18 pm
    Post #103 - May 4th, 2010, 9:18 pm Post #103 - May 4th, 2010, 9:18 pm
    Suzy Creamcheese wrote:
    Ha, I won't. I was just wondering about not being allowed to order a dish -that seems very strange.


    It's happened to me at least twice at SSGS (though, noticeably, never when I've been with anyone of even partial Asian descent)...I've just been told I wouldn't like something and they will not let me order it. Other times, I've been instructed in very insistent tones on how to cook the food I've been given, which oils and sauces to apply, else it be ruined or unpalatable to me. Up to and including having the waitress standing over my shoulder watching me cook and making sure I applied the sesame oil to a particular cut of beef...

    That said, SSGS is one of my favorite restaurants in the city, and I would put up with just about anything to eat there.
  • Post #104 - May 4th, 2010, 9:35 pm
    Post #104 - May 4th, 2010, 9:35 pm Post #104 - May 4th, 2010, 9:35 pm
    Now that I think of it, I have a hazy memory of not being allowed to order a dish in a Chinese restaurant because "white people don't like it." Wonder what on earth it was? Nowadays I think I'd insist, but lo these fifteen years ago, I was not so assertive.
    As a mattra-fact, Pie Face, you are beginning to look almost human. - Barbara Bennett
  • Post #105 - May 4th, 2010, 9:43 pm
    Post #105 - May 4th, 2010, 9:43 pm Post #105 - May 4th, 2010, 9:43 pm
    Suzy Creamcheese wrote:Now that I think of it, I have a hazy memory of not being allowed to order a dish in a Chinese restaurant because "white people don't like it." Wonder what on earth it was? Nowadays I think I'd insist, but lo these fifteen years ago, I was not so assertive.
    And probably caught off guard, because who ever expected to be denied a menu item?

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #106 - May 4th, 2010, 9:49 pm
    Post #106 - May 4th, 2010, 9:49 pm Post #106 - May 4th, 2010, 9:49 pm
    I seem to remember this happening at our namesake LTH as well. To even Gary himself. :)
    "Make Lunch, Not War" ~ Anon
  • Post #107 - May 4th, 2010, 10:29 pm
    Post #107 - May 4th, 2010, 10:29 pm Post #107 - May 4th, 2010, 10:29 pm
    Panther in the Den wrote:I seem to remember this happening at our namesake LTH as well. To even Gary himself. :)
    I don't remember it happening at 'Little' Three Happiness, but I had to try pretty hard one lunch to get a tongue dish at SSGS and have been flat out denied Sliced Beef and Maw Szechuan style at Lao Sze Chuan

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Sauce on the side, always, implied, axiomatic..........never a doubt, BBQ sauce without.

    Low & Slow
  • Post #108 - May 4th, 2010, 11:15 pm
    Post #108 - May 4th, 2010, 11:15 pm Post #108 - May 4th, 2010, 11:15 pm
    Oops!

    It was the Sliced Beef and Maw at LSC that I mis-recollected.

    Thanks for the memory refresher.
    "Make Lunch, Not War" ~ Anon
  • Post #109 - June 7th, 2010, 4:44 pm
    Post #109 - June 7th, 2010, 4:44 pm Post #109 - June 7th, 2010, 4:44 pm
    I think it may be time for a "Save this Restaurant" for Kang Nam. Last Friday night, from about 7:30pm to 9:00pm, there was only one other party in the place. And, this is a shame, because the food was good, panchan fresh and plentiful, soup spicy, and service great. We received a second helping of panchan without asking and water glasses were repeatedly filled.

    I don't usually eat Korean food often, but had Kang Nam on Friday and then Hae Woon Dae last night. So, Korean twice in three days. Honestly, the quality of the food and service was like night and day. By eating at the two restaurants in just a few days, it was easy to make a comparison. I had thought the quality was similar, but not after a particularly tired meal at Hae Woon Dae last night. A few things were good at Hae Woon Dae, but nothing was better than what we ate at Kang Nam. Granted, we didn't eat the *exact* same dishes at both restaurants - - but there were enough similarities that I think the comparison is fair.

    Please visit Kang Nam soon, because the food is good (and because I do want them to stay open given that they're just five minutes from home).

    Ronna
  • Post #110 - July 7th, 2010, 9:43 am
    Post #110 - July 7th, 2010, 9:43 am Post #110 - July 7th, 2010, 9:43 am
    San Soo Gab San this upcoming Friday, woot :)
  • Post #111 - July 8th, 2010, 11:40 am
    Post #111 - July 8th, 2010, 11:40 am Post #111 - July 8th, 2010, 11:40 am
    After viewing the New Jersey ep of "No Reservations" I am dying to try Korean soft tofu stew. Don't know the Korean name. Is this something I can get at a BBQ joint, or should I seek out a tofu house? Any recs on where I might find a good one?
    As a mattra-fact, Pie Face, you are beginning to look almost human. - Barbara Bennett
  • Post #112 - July 8th, 2010, 11:48 am
    Post #112 - July 8th, 2010, 11:48 am Post #112 - July 8th, 2010, 11:48 am
    If you're talking about sundubu jigae, the one at Cho Jung has been highly recommended (and I concur).
  • Post #113 - July 8th, 2010, 11:57 am
    Post #113 - July 8th, 2010, 11:57 am Post #113 - July 8th, 2010, 11:57 am
    cilantro wrote:If you're talking about sundubu jigae, the one at Cho Jung has been highly recommended (and I concur).


    I might be? It certainly sounds like it. Thanks!
    As a mattra-fact, Pie Face, you are beginning to look almost human. - Barbara Bennett
  • Post #114 - July 8th, 2010, 11:59 am
    Post #114 - July 8th, 2010, 11:59 am Post #114 - July 8th, 2010, 11:59 am
    I haven't seen the episode you are talking about so I'm not sure if they have the soup you are looking for, but this place specializes in tofu soup. Its been many years since I have been there, so I can't provide a review of it or any additional information.

    Hopefully one or more of the many knowledgeable people here can.

    Sogongdong Tofu House
    3307 W Bryn Mawr Ave, Chicago, IL 60659
    (773) 539-8377
  • Post #115 - July 8th, 2010, 1:04 pm
    Post #115 - July 8th, 2010, 1:04 pm Post #115 - July 8th, 2010, 1:04 pm
    jsco wrote:I haven't seen the episode you are talking about so I'm not sure if they have the soup you are looking for, but this place specializes in tofu soup. Its been many years since I have been there, so I can't provide a review of it or any additional information.

    Hopefully one or more of the many knowledgeable people here can.

    Sogongdong Tofu House
    3307 W Bryn Mawr Ave, Chicago, IL 60659
    (773) 539-8377

    Seemed to be pretty popular when I stopped by on a Sunday afternoon maybe a year or two ago. It can be odd sweating over a hot 'n' spicy soup on a hot summer's day, however. Koreans I know seem to like it.
  • Post #116 - October 13th, 2012, 12:01 pm
    Post #116 - October 13th, 2012, 12:01 pm Post #116 - October 13th, 2012, 12:01 pm
    I had always been a fan of Hae Woon Dae, but then I had a very mediocre meal there a couple of years ago and had not been back since. That is, until the other night at the dinner turkob organized. I have to say this was one of the very best Korean bbq meals I've ever had, and the best at Hae Woon Dae. Very well seasoned kalbi, bulgogi and beef tongue, coupled with live charcoal, made for a beautiful centerpiece.

    Just as good was the Bo ssam with terrific pork belly and the raw beef. And although some would have preferred the seafood pancake to be a little more crispy, I thought it was terrific (although we all agreed it was even better when charred over live coals). Panchan was also very respectable, even if not the best I've tasted. And egg custard was fine, although I preferred it more in the past.

    The only items that didn't impress me were the steamed mandu (perhaps pan fried would have been the way to go), and the strange salad of shredded lettuce with a thousand island/french style dressing that I'm sure came out of a big jug. But overall, a really terrific meal.
  • Post #117 - January 19th, 2013, 12:25 am
    Post #117 - January 19th, 2013, 12:25 am Post #117 - January 19th, 2013, 12:25 am
    I've read through this whole thread and would appreciate a bit of help in identifying the "spicy red sauce" that accompanies dol sot bibim bop (always served on the side). It seems to have the consistency slightly thicker than ketchup and the flavor is great wherever I've had it. Not as hot as sriracha. I'd like to buy a jar of it to have in the house when I feel adventurous (which is nothing like the regular LTH adventurousness).

    Thanks!
  • Post #118 - January 19th, 2013, 1:15 am
    Post #118 - January 19th, 2013, 1:15 am Post #118 - January 19th, 2013, 1:15 am
    It's called gochujang (고추장) and it comes in red tubs at the Asian markets.
  • Post #119 - January 19th, 2013, 2:19 pm
    Post #119 - January 19th, 2013, 2:19 pm Post #119 - January 19th, 2013, 2:19 pm
    It's not just Golchujang though, I'm pretty sure. Usually has stuff added to it, like some vinegar, sesame oil , or sugar.
  • Post #120 - January 19th, 2013, 2:29 pm
    Post #120 - January 19th, 2013, 2:29 pm Post #120 - January 19th, 2013, 2:29 pm
    Ssamjang perhaps? I bought some at Joong Boo along with gojuchang for Bo ssam sauce --it was definitely tangy from the fermented bean paste.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington

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