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Eating at Publican Quality Meats

Eating at Publican Quality Meats
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  • Post #31 - June 13th, 2012, 10:39 am
    Post #31 - June 13th, 2012, 10:39 am Post #31 - June 13th, 2012, 10:39 am
    Won't hate on PQM but head around the block to Olympia Meats and get that same pack for less than $20.
  • Post #32 - June 13th, 2012, 12:15 pm
    Post #32 - June 13th, 2012, 12:15 pm Post #32 - June 13th, 2012, 12:15 pm
    Well, the same generic items, for sure.
  • Post #33 - June 13th, 2012, 12:45 pm
    Post #33 - June 13th, 2012, 12:45 pm Post #33 - June 13th, 2012, 12:45 pm
    Just got back from lunch...porchetta sandwich special on some great ciabatta really hit the spot. The (rather bland)chips I had previously been served with other sandwiches were replaced with a kale salad dressed in a bright vinaigrette that went real well with the fatty pork.
  • Post #34 - June 13th, 2012, 2:33 pm
    Post #34 - June 13th, 2012, 2:33 pm Post #34 - June 13th, 2012, 2:33 pm
    AlekH wrote:Just got back from lunch...porchetta sandwich special on some great ciabatta really hit the spot. The (rather bland)chips I had previously been served with other sandwiches were replaced with a kale salad dressed in a bright vinaigrette that went real well with the fatty pork.


    Hey, I had the porchetta sandwich yesterday for lunch. I cannot say I enjoyed it nearly as much. In fact, I'd say I was rather disappointed in it. Overall, I think my unhappiness fell within my crusade of late in the "crispification" of America. That all our foods must be overly crisp (in fact I wonder if the complaints of the fat on the pork at Next Sicily are simply people who cannot take their stuff gooey). The pork, at least yesterday, was sliced and then griddled, resulting not in an enjoyable crisp, like say fried chicken crust (it's not cripness that is bad but only crispness that is bad) but in tough, tough meat, without much flavor either. Like you, however, I liked the kale, and given the totality of CSA kale I've been eating, that's really saying something about the dish.

    Now, the "better than gyro" allowed the fat to shine, and it was a much better sandwich in my opinion. I also very much liked the spicy meatball, which had a lot of zing. The roast beef sandwich, on the other hand, seemed plain and not nearly as good as something I could do at home.
  • Post #35 - June 13th, 2012, 2:46 pm
    Post #35 - June 13th, 2012, 2:46 pm Post #35 - June 13th, 2012, 2:46 pm
    Vital Information wrote:
    AlekH wrote:Just got back from lunch...porchetta sandwich special on some great ciabatta really hit the spot. The (rather bland)chips I had previously been served with other sandwiches were replaced with a kale salad dressed in a bright vinaigrette that went real well with the fatty pork.


    Hey, I had the porchetta sandwich yesterday for lunch. I cannot say I enjoyed it nearly as much. In fact, I'd say I was rather disappointed in it. Overall, I think my unhappiness fell within my crusade of late in the "crispification" of America. That all our foods must be overly crisp (in fact I wonder if the complaints of the fat on the pork at Next Sicily are simply people who cannot take their stuff gooey). The pork, at least yesterday, was sliced and then griddled, resulting not in an enjoyable crisp, like say fried chicken crust (it's not cripness that is bad but only crispness that is bad) but in tough, tough meat, without much flavor either. Like you, however, I liked the kale, and given the totality of CSA kale I've been eating, that's really saying something about the dish.

    Now, the "better than gyro" allowed the fat to shine, and it was a much better sandwich in my opinion. I also very much liked the spicy meatball, which had a lot of zing. The roast beef sandwich, on the other hand, seemed plain and not nearly as good as something I could do at home.



    Mine was anything but tough (although not really crisp either) and featured plenty of nice soft fatty bites. Luck of the draw i guess.
  • Post #36 - June 13th, 2012, 4:25 pm
    Post #36 - June 13th, 2012, 4:25 pm Post #36 - June 13th, 2012, 4:25 pm
    AlekH wrote:
    Vital Information wrote:
    AlekH wrote:Just got back from lunch...porchetta sandwich special on some great ciabatta really hit the spot. The (rather bland)chips I had previously been served with other sandwiches were replaced with a kale salad dressed in a bright vinaigrette that went real well with the fatty pork.


    Hey, I had the porchetta sandwich yesterday for lunch. I cannot say I enjoyed it nearly as much. In fact, I'd say I was rather disappointed in it. Overall, I think my unhappiness fell within my crusade of late in the "crispification" of America. That all our foods must be overly crisp (in fact I wonder if the complaints of the fat on the pork at Next Sicily are simply people who cannot take their stuff gooey). The pork, at least yesterday, was sliced and then griddled, resulting not in an enjoyable crisp, like say fried chicken crust (it's not cripness that is bad but only crispness that is bad) but in tough, tough meat, without much flavor either. Like you, however, I liked the kale, and given the totality of CSA kale I've been eating, that's really saying something about the dish.

    Now, the "better than gyro" allowed the fat to shine, and it was a much better sandwich in my opinion. I also very much liked the spicy meatball, which had a lot of zing. The roast beef sandwich, on the other hand, seemed plain and not nearly as good as something I could do at home.



    Mine was anything but tough (although not really crisp either) and featured plenty of nice soft fatty bites. Luck of the draw i guess.


    I guess, but mine was also small :wink: :)
  • Post #37 - February 28th, 2013, 11:16 pm
    Post #37 - February 28th, 2013, 11:16 pm Post #37 - February 28th, 2013, 11:16 pm
    I was feeling nostalgic about Sweden last week and got their new Scandinavian-style sandwich (they call it a "tartine") and a glass of their glögg, which is unfortunately a bit swampy (I usually filter it out when I make it and then add the raisins and almonds so I don't get cloves stuff in my teeth and whatnot).

    The sandwich is excellent even though it is not well-engineered enough to not fall apart a bit. The contrast between the robust rye, globes of maple cured roe, the succulent arctic char, the mild creamy cheese, and fresh slices of fennel was very nice, except I really got a craving for some strong Swedish mustard.

    Image
  • Post #38 - March 1st, 2013, 3:49 pm
    Post #38 - March 1st, 2013, 3:49 pm Post #38 - March 1st, 2013, 3:49 pm
    Wow. That takes me back. I long ago had some business in Germany and the office catering was basically open-faced sandwiches and, I swear, the one I always took was precisely this, down to the last ingredient. It was Frankfurt and our German businesspeople hosts refused to allow us any German food. French and Italian for dinner and these things for lunch. I'd always thought the caterer was going for something Scottish with that particular sammy. But now I see positive proof otherwise. (Though I guess the geography and food of Scottland isn't so far off.)
  • Post #39 - March 1st, 2013, 5:09 pm
    Post #39 - March 1st, 2013, 5:09 pm Post #39 - March 1st, 2013, 5:09 pm
    mgmcewen wrote:I was feeling nostalgic about Sweden last week and got their new Scandinavian-style sandwich (they call it a "tartine") and a glass of their glögg, which is unfortunately a bit swampy (I usually filter it out when I make it and then add the raisins and almonds so I don't get cloves stuff in my teeth and whatnot).

    The sandwich is excellent even though it is not well-engineered enough to not fall apart a bit. The contrast between the robust rye, globes of maple cured roe, the succulent arctic char, the mild creamy cheese, and fresh slices of fennel was very nice, except I really got a craving for some strong Swedish mustard.

    Image


    Cool. I really have not understood why Scandinavian/Nordic food has not taken off more in Chicago. We still seem so much in the thrall of Mediterranean food, but given our climate it would be very interesting if some chefs looked more to the North (especially as it is otherwise a hot food trend out there). Maybe this is the start.
  • Post #40 - March 1st, 2013, 11:21 pm
    Post #40 - March 1st, 2013, 11:21 pm Post #40 - March 1st, 2013, 11:21 pm
    mgmcewen wrote:Image


    Man that looks awesome.
  • Post #41 - March 2nd, 2013, 2:09 am
    Post #41 - March 2nd, 2013, 2:09 am Post #41 - March 2nd, 2013, 2:09 am
    Vital Information wrote:
    mgmcewen wrote:I was feeling nostalgic about Sweden last week and got their new Scandinavian-style sandwich (they call it a "tartine") and a glass of their glögg, which is unfortunately a bit swampy (I usually filter it out when I make it and then add the raisins and almonds so I don't get cloves stuff in my teeth and whatnot).

    The sandwich is excellent even though it is not well-engineered enough to not fall apart a bit. The contrast between the robust rye, globes of maple cured roe, the succulent arctic char, the mild creamy cheese, and fresh slices of fennel was very nice, except I really got a craving for some strong Swedish mustard.

    Image


    Cool. I really have not understood why Scandinavian/Nordic food has not taken off more in Chicago. We still seem so much in the thrall of Mediterranean food, but given our climate it would be very interesting if some chefs looked more to the North (especially as it is otherwise a hot food trend out there). Maybe this is the start.


    Here is a somewhat similar sandwich with Gotland (an Island off the Eastern coast of Sweden) lamb perfectly cooked, ramsons, and spring mushrooms I had at Dahlgren's Matbaren in Stockholm last spring.

    Image

    I was sad I left NYC before Aamans, a Copenhagen import that specializes in such sandwiches, opened up in Tribeca. Next time I go there I'll have to check it out. I think Chicago is ripe for a Nordic revival. Yeah, we have a few Swedish-influenced places, but I haven't been particularly satisfied with any of them. I really liked this PQM sandwich though- I feel like it captured the spirit of the Swedish one at Dahlgren's, which is all about fresh local in-season high-quality ingredients. And the ability to work well with difficult flavors- bitter, earthy, fishy, intoxicatingly herbal, sour. And still taste good. It is a great start. A lot of PQM sandwiches (and most things) I find are a bit too heavy for a light lunch, so this is a fantastic addition to the menu, along with the surprisingly delicious marinated kale that has appeared lately.
  • Post #42 - March 2nd, 2013, 9:31 am
    Post #42 - March 2nd, 2013, 9:31 am Post #42 - March 2nd, 2013, 9:31 am
    mgmcewen wrote:I was sad I left NYC before Aamans, a Copenhagen import that specializes in such sandwiches, opened up in Tribeca. Next time I go there I'll have to check it out.
    That's super exciting! I loved my visit to Aamanns Etablissement in Copenhagen, and will put Aamanns on top of my list for my next NYC visit.

    -Dan
  • Post #43 - March 2nd, 2013, 10:03 am
    Post #43 - March 2nd, 2013, 10:03 am Post #43 - March 2nd, 2013, 10:03 am
    The kale has been a side for quite awhile. Had it around lollapooluza last yr and has been there every time I've been since. It's delicious and only $2.50
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #44 - March 25th, 2013, 9:04 am
    Post #44 - March 25th, 2013, 9:04 am Post #44 - March 25th, 2013, 9:04 am
    I like PQM, cant believe I havent posted on this spot before. While I dont need to buy much fresh meat in the Chicago as I am pretty well set up where I live, PQM's display cases of cured meats, sausages and aged meat are a treat.

    I have enjoyed a sandwich or 3 here(better than gyros,lamb meatball, etc.), I enjoy browsing and picking up some specialty items on occasion. Saturday while wasting a few minutes before dinner @ Publican we popped in for a quick visit.

    Image

    I really like the staff @ PQM, friendly folks who enjoy their craft.

    Cant have too many pics of the treasure in their display cases imo:

    Image

    Image

    Image

    None of those beautiful meats were in the cards for purchase this evening(however some were sampled @ Publican for supper). I did end up with a jar of their lard, a pack of their magnificent burgers, and a small chunk of Foie.
    R.I.P. jimswside - 5/2/16



    @GrubSeeker
  • Post #45 - March 25th, 2013, 10:31 am
    Post #45 - March 25th, 2013, 10:31 am Post #45 - March 25th, 2013, 10:31 am
    If you watch youtube much, you'll probably come across, as I have several times, an ad video (before the clip you're looking for) about Publican - patrons saying how great it is, hand-held-type shots of the interior, etc. I think the video is actually advertising something else, maybe a credit card, but it's neat to see a somewhat niche place getting mainstream exposure.
    fine words butter no parsnips
  • Post #46 - March 25th, 2013, 4:44 pm
    Post #46 - March 25th, 2013, 4:44 pm Post #46 - March 25th, 2013, 4:44 pm
    I had the porchetta, which I guess is only available on weekends, on Saturday and it was incredible. Fatty, but well-balanced. I hate brunch and only went out because I had been in the office for a special project. We tried to go to Au Cheval first but honestly the staff is super unwelcoming there if there is a wait, with PQM they are all super nice no matter how crowded it is.
  • Post #47 - March 25th, 2013, 7:37 pm
    Post #47 - March 25th, 2013, 7:37 pm Post #47 - March 25th, 2013, 7:37 pm
    mgmcewen wrote:I had the porchetta, which I guess is only available on weekends, on Saturday and it was incredible. Fatty, but well-balanced. I hate brunch and only went out because I had been in the office for a special project. We tried to go to Au Cheval first but honestly the staff is super unwelcoming there if there is a wait, with PQM they are all super nice no matter how crowded it is.


    I agree, the staff is incredibly friendly. Many of them made a point to learn my name after I came in maybe 5 times. One of my favorite spots for lunch. If I'm not too hungry a cup of soup and a side of kale make a tasty, cheap ($7), relatively healthy lunch.

    They recently added a "Return of the Gyro" which to me tastes even better than the original.

    FYI - they are also selling handy key ring bottle openers for all you LTHers that what to show off your PQM love.
  • Post #48 - March 26th, 2013, 10:21 am
    Post #48 - March 26th, 2013, 10:21 am Post #48 - March 26th, 2013, 10:21 am
    mgmcewen wrote:I had the porchetta, which I guess is only available on weekends, on Saturday and it was incredible. Fatty, but well-balanced.

    I once purchased a slice of this when I was there on a Saturday and it was sensational. They were actually slicing off little samples for folks in the store. The lady next to me asked for one and immediately complained that it was too fatty. I couldn't help myself and actually said to her: "lady, you're in the wrong store." Happily, she ignored me. I also ran into LTHer Mr. Chico there that morning. Seems I almost always run into an LTHer when I'm there. It's a very special store and I'm grateful we have it here in town because there's nothing else even remotely like it here.

    =R=
    There's a horse loose in a hospital -- JM

    I am not interested in how I would evaluate the Springbank in a blind tasting. Every spirit has its story, and I include it in my evaluation, just as I do with human beings. --Thad Vogler

    I'll be the tastiest pork cutlet bowl ever --Yuri Katsuki

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #49 - March 26th, 2013, 10:36 am
    Post #49 - March 26th, 2013, 10:36 am Post #49 - March 26th, 2013, 10:36 am
    Haven't had the prochetta here but will say that Panozzo's has an excellent one as well.
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #50 - March 26th, 2013, 10:52 am
    Post #50 - March 26th, 2013, 10:52 am Post #50 - March 26th, 2013, 10:52 am
    Jazzfood wrote:Haven't had the prochetta here but will say that Panozzo's has an excellent one as well.

    I've had both and prefer Panozzo's . . . no knock on PQM mind you.
  • Post #51 - June 2nd, 2013, 10:47 am
    Post #51 - June 2nd, 2013, 10:47 am Post #51 - June 2nd, 2013, 10:47 am
    This was on yesterday's brunch menu:

    Spring Vegetable Ragout - fresh peas, sugar snap, pea tendrils, asparagus, radish, pecorino, bacon, poached eggs, and a green garlic pesto.

    Image

    Easily one of the best things I've had all year, and for only $10.
    "We eat slowly and with gusto." - Paul Bäumer in AQOTWF
  • Post #52 - June 2nd, 2013, 12:20 pm
    Post #52 - June 2nd, 2013, 12:20 pm Post #52 - June 2nd, 2013, 12:20 pm
    Wow, that looks phenomenal! And I wouldn't have expected a meat-centric store to have such a great vegetable entree!
  • Post #53 - June 3rd, 2013, 11:17 am
    Post #53 - June 3rd, 2013, 11:17 am Post #53 - June 3rd, 2013, 11:17 am
    If there is a complaint I have it's that PQM's brunch menu tends to outshine its regular lunch menu. I'd love if they would serve that ragout for weekday lunch instead of the miserable salads currently on the menu. I made the mistake of having the turkey salad a few weeks ago. It's like something an anemic aspiring actress in LA would make from the Whole Food's salad bar- smatterings of shredded deli turkey on uncharitably dressed greens. I don't always want to eat a sandwich, but I still have a healthy appetite. I want my greens AND delicious meat.
  • Post #54 - June 3rd, 2013, 11:28 am
    Post #54 - June 3rd, 2013, 11:28 am Post #54 - June 3rd, 2013, 11:28 am
    Their kale side for around $3. is one of my favorite veg dishes in town.
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #55 - June 3rd, 2013, 1:07 pm
    Post #55 - June 3rd, 2013, 1:07 pm Post #55 - June 3rd, 2013, 1:07 pm
    Jazzfood wrote:Their kale side for around $3. is one of my favorite veg dishes in town.


    I completely agree. It's really good.
  • Post #56 - June 3rd, 2013, 3:34 pm
    Post #56 - June 3rd, 2013, 3:34 pm Post #56 - June 3rd, 2013, 3:34 pm
    I love that Kale too, been meaning to bug them for the recipe - Chef Paul told me it was his wife's recipe, from some yoga recipe book...this looks close but I don't think they do pine nuts.
    http://thepracticeyoga.wordpress.com/2012/06/21/the-best-kale-salad-you-will-ever-eat-seriously/
  • Post #57 - June 3rd, 2013, 3:40 pm
    Post #57 - June 3rd, 2013, 3:40 pm Post #57 - June 3rd, 2013, 3:40 pm
    A part of me wishes that they could market the return of old favorites to the menu the way McDonald's does the McRib. We might have people camped out it front of the store for the 'Nduja sandwich, or the green garlic soup.
    "I've always thought pastrami was the most sensuous of the salted cured meats."
  • Post #58 - May 31st, 2014, 7:16 pm
    Post #58 - May 31st, 2014, 7:16 pm Post #58 - May 31st, 2014, 7:16 pm
    There's so much love for the pork belly gyros, but it just didn't do it for me. Though it's worth noting that what one person may have had a year ago might not be what I had earlier this week.

    I had no problem with the pork belly which was plenty rich. But I found that the Calabrian chili vinaigrette really overwhelmed all other flavors, including the raita which was a little heavy on mint for me. I am such a huge fan of a traditional gyros sandwich and I thought they just screwed with the flavors too much here. I also didn't love the pita, only because I prefer when there's a little char to the pita or at least the edges. This one was simply soft.

    I will say I ate it all, and overall it was fine, but perhaps great expectations got the better of me. Even worse is that I was in the mood for a porchetta sandwich but found out they only serve it on weekends. I will note that the sandwich was served with a slaw (the details of which I cannot remember), and this slaw was really fantastic.
    I find the pastrami to be the most sensual of all the salted, cured meats. (Seinfeld)

    Twitter: brbinchicago
  • Post #59 - May 31st, 2014, 9:10 pm
    Post #59 - May 31st, 2014, 9:10 pm Post #59 - May 31st, 2014, 9:10 pm
    BR wrote:I will note that the sandwich was served with a slaw (the details of which I cannot remember), and this slaw was really fantastic.


    All of the little sides I've had (slaws included) at PQM have been fantastic. This is not surprising because at Mothership Publican, they excel in most vegetable dishes - both simple and involved.
  • Post #60 - June 1st, 2014, 4:59 pm
    Post #60 - June 1st, 2014, 4:59 pm Post #60 - June 1st, 2014, 4:59 pm
    PQM can do no wrong by me, but can anyone who's had the ribollita recently confirm that it's the same as it always was? A recent bowl was mostly liquid, much different than the thick, beany delight I've had in the past. An accident of timing?

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