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Soul Food in Chicago, perhaps new-fangled

Soul Food in Chicago, perhaps new-fangled
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  • Soul Food in Chicago, perhaps new-fangled

    Post #1 - April 5th, 2012, 9:34 pm
    Post #1 - April 5th, 2012, 9:34 pm Post #1 - April 5th, 2012, 9:34 pm
    Hi! After a recent meal at Marcus Samuelsson's Red Rooster in Harlem, and with memories of Georgia Brown's in DC, PigEars and I got to wondering about soul-food in Chicago, especially upscale, experimental, or nouveau soul (not to get into any authenticity battles here). Is there such a thing in town? (Do we count Big Jones?) Additionally, what is the forum consensus on the best old school places? Searching the site, I see some places that have closed (Doggy's) and that have modest reporting (Pearl's) -- if there's a thread I've missed, please merge. Thanks!
  • Post #2 - April 5th, 2012, 11:22 pm
    Post #2 - April 5th, 2012, 11:22 pm Post #2 - April 5th, 2012, 11:22 pm
    annak wrote:(Do we count Big Jones?)


    What Fehribach is doing is certainly in the same general family as soul food, but it feels more "upscale" though not "noveau" or "experimental" (quite the contrary, as it seems he's trying to be as true to traditional forms as possible).

    I'm intrigued by chefs like Fehribach who, like Bayless, take an anthropological approach to menu development, and I appreciate when chefs try to take us to somewhere else.

    For by-the-book soul food, you might consider B.J.'s Market (8734 South Stony Island).
    “We all have to stand before the kitchen gods.” Chef Jacob Sahaya Kumar Aruni
  • Post #3 - April 6th, 2012, 10:39 am
    Post #3 - April 6th, 2012, 10:39 am Post #3 - April 6th, 2012, 10:39 am
    Not sure what soul food means these days or how it's distinguished from generic non-Louisiana Southern. For this Son of the South, my rule of thumb is anyplace with collards and grits in regular rotation counts. Maybe too obvious, but Feed, Wishbone, Table 52 are all places that make some New South version of Southern food that overlaps with traditional soul food, in addition to Big Jones and the Southern. I think any are as much Soul Food as that Swedish guy's place in upper Manhattan.

    Chicago has some of its own very unique soul food traditions, like the vegetarian African Hebrew Israelite community's rock Soul Vegetarian East or its newer neighbor, Yah's.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_He ... _Jerusalem

    The place that is most like the ideal meat-and-threes of the Mid-South (eg, Arnold's) in menu and setup is probably Priscilla's in Hillside, well worth a visit to set your baseline.

    http://www.priscillasultimatesoulfood.com/menus.htm#Ent

    Or how about Daley's, maybe the oldest Soul Food place in the world, hard by the 63rd Street L since 1892. The thought of grits, greens, eggs and salt pork or a hot link has me thinking I'd better get down there soon.

    http://daleysrestaurant.com/menu/daleys-dinner.pdf

    The real expert on this topic, as with most others, is ReneG.

    But my favorite Chicago soulfood is a pile of corned beef or a porkchop on a big bowl of grits at Moon's.
  • Post #4 - April 6th, 2012, 1:09 pm
    Post #4 - April 6th, 2012, 1:09 pm Post #4 - April 6th, 2012, 1:09 pm
    Don't want to hijack, but I missed my Army and Lou's window - they are closed, right?

    I was raised by Mississipians, and don't really consider "Southern Food" "Soul Food," but that's me. I kinda associate cheap, cheap, stuff with "Soul Food" - again, just me. That said, my question is - anyplace around have chitlins on offer every day? The only place I knew of that did was Army and Lou's if I'm not mistaken.
    We cannot be friends if you do not know the difference between Mayo and Miracle Whip.
  • Post #5 - April 6th, 2012, 1:28 pm
    Post #5 - April 6th, 2012, 1:28 pm Post #5 - April 6th, 2012, 1:28 pm
    seebee wrote:Don't want to hijack, but I missed my Army and Lou's window - they are closed, right?

    I was raised by Mississipians, and don't really consider "Southern Food" "Soul Food," but that's me. I kinda associate cheap, cheap, stuff with "Soul Food" - again, just me. That said, my question is - anyplace around have chitlins on offer every day? The only place I knew of that did was Army and Lou's if I'm not mistaken.


    Yep, Army and Lou's is closed, and that's the last place I had chitterlings in the States. I have them every decade, hoping they'll start to taste better...and they do!
    “We all have to stand before the kitchen gods.” Chef Jacob Sahaya Kumar Aruni
  • Post #6 - April 6th, 2012, 1:42 pm
    Post #6 - April 6th, 2012, 1:42 pm Post #6 - April 6th, 2012, 1:42 pm
    seebee wrote:Don't want to hijack, but I missed my Army and Lou's window - they are closed, right?

    Army & Lou's is closed but reportedly a new owner will reopen it in June "as a blues-themed restaurant with an updated look and menu."
  • Post #7 - April 6th, 2012, 3:36 pm
    Post #7 - April 6th, 2012, 3:36 pm Post #7 - April 6th, 2012, 3:36 pm
    David Hammond wrote:
    seebee wrote:Don't want to hijack, but I missed my Army and Lou's window - they are closed, right?

    I was raised by Mississipians, and don't really consider "Southern Food" "Soul Food," but that's me. I kinda associate cheap, cheap, stuff with "Soul Food" - again, just me. That said, my question is - anyplace around have chitlins on offer every day? The only place I knew of that did was Army and Lou's if I'm not mistaken.


    Yep, Army and Lou's is closed, and that's the last place I had chitterlings in the States. I have them every decade, hoping they'll start to taste better...and they do!


    They have more of a smell than a taste (as odd as that sounds to say since those senses are so intertwined.) Other than that, it's all about the flavor of the hot sauce and the seasonings they were cooked in. And, oh yeah, the texture, and the fact that it's intestines.
    We cannot be friends if you do not know the difference between Mayo and Miracle Whip.
  • Post #8 - April 6th, 2012, 3:42 pm
    Post #8 - April 6th, 2012, 3:42 pm Post #8 - April 6th, 2012, 3:42 pm
    seebee wrote:They have more of a smell than a taste (as odd as that sounds to say since those senses are so intertwined.) Other than that, it's all about the flavor of the hot sauce and the seasonings they were cooked in. And, oh yeah, the texture, and the fact that it's intestines.


    Image

    "Enjoyed" rolled and fried pig intestine last weekend at Hong Kong Ladies' Market. They were chewy...and benefitted from hot sauce.

    So that was this decade's effort. :lol:
    “We all have to stand before the kitchen gods.” Chef Jacob Sahaya Kumar Aruni
  • Post #9 - April 9th, 2012, 3:44 pm
    Post #9 - April 9th, 2012, 3:44 pm Post #9 - April 9th, 2012, 3:44 pm
    So many of the good old places have closed in the last few years. Currently my favorites might be Saint Rest #2 and Morrison's. Both are cafeteria style. For table service I'd recommend Ruby's (the old Edna's).

    Oxtails, Saint Rest #2
    Image

    Stuffed Pepper, Morrison's
    Image

    Short Ribs, Ruby's
    Image

    Saint Rest #2 Country Kitchen
    727 E 87th St
    Chicago
    773-962-0700

    Morrison's Soul Food
    8131 S Ashland Av
    Chicago
    773-892-1078

    Ruby's Restaurant
    3175 W Madison St
    Chicago
    773-638-5875
  • Post #10 - April 12th, 2012, 9:21 pm
    Post #10 - April 12th, 2012, 9:21 pm Post #10 - April 12th, 2012, 9:21 pm
    Haven't tried this place yet but have heard good things about it.

    Located in the old Cafe Liguardia West space next to Amarind’s Thai

    My Mothers Kitchen

    6818 West North Avenue
    Chicago, IL 60707
    Main: 773-887-4368
    http://www.mymotherskitchenchicago.com/#
    Why does man kill? He kills for food. And not only food: frequently there must be a beverage.
    Woody Allen
  • Post #11 - September 11th, 2017, 2:19 pm
    Post #11 - September 11th, 2017, 2:19 pm Post #11 - September 11th, 2017, 2:19 pm
    JeffB wrote:
    Or how about Daley's, maybe the oldest Soul Food place in the world, hard by the 63rd Street L since 1892. The thought of grits, greens, eggs and salt pork or a hot link has me thinking I'd better get down there soon.

    http://daleysrestaurant.com/menu/daleys-dinner.pdf


    Daley's, City's Oldest Restaurant, Moving After 125 Years In Same Spot

    https://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/2017091 ... -same-spot
    "Sandwiches are wonderful. You don't need a spoon or a plate!"
    Paul Lynde

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