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Baker Miller Bakery & Millhouse - Lincoln Square

Baker Miller Bakery & Millhouse - Lincoln Square
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  • Baker Miller Bakery & Millhouse - Lincoln Square

    Post #1 - September 22nd, 2014, 5:09 pm
    Post #1 - September 22nd, 2014, 5:09 pm Post #1 - September 22nd, 2014, 5:09 pm
    As you've all probably read (perhaps here), Dave and Megan Miller sold their interests in Bang Bang Pie Company to their business partner, and decided to open up Baker Miller, where in addition to baking breads, pastries, sweet and savory items, they'll also be milling their own flour. Equally exciting is the news that they'll be serving Sparrow Coffee.

    Today is their grand opening, and while I didn't make it in for the made morning rush (thus missing out on the breads and most pastries), I made it in for a couple of slices of pie and an iced Sparrow coffee. If first impressions are indicative, this place is going to be a major hit.

    The cheesecake pie (with what tastes like a dulce de leche topping) is fantastic, from the crust (I believe oat) to the smooth filling to the wonderful topping, the latter being the highlight for me.

    Image
    Cheesecake Pie


    Even better was the butterscotch pie, easily one of the best pies I've ever tasted. The combination of the butterscotch filling (not too sweet, with almost the rich taste of pumpkin, sans spices) and the toasty oatmeal crust (maybe coconut too?), is sensational. While my preference is usually all-butter crusts, these crusts are absolutely delicious.

    Image
    Butterscotch Pie


    Unfortunately, I had tasted both pies by the time I decided to take pictures so don't blame Baker Miller for any visible imperfections. :oops: I saved plenty to share with a friend of mine coming over for the Bears game.

    They're also serving a couple types of breads, muffins, popovers, savory items and breakfast, brunch and lunch. Eater posted a copy of their opening menu. And of course, there's the Sparrow coffee. I had a terrific iced coffee this visit, and I can't tell you how excited I am to finally have great coffee in the neighborhood.

    In terms of seating, there are a couple of benches out in front of the restaurant, several tables inside, and a back patio that is not yet set up for seating (but will be). There are a lot of excellent restaurants in Lincoln Square, but great coffee and baked goods have been sorely missing. That is no longer the case.

    Baker Miller Bakery & Millhouse
    4610 N. Western Ave. (next door to Spoon Thai and steps from Western Ave. Brown Line station)
    Chicago
    [no phone listed yet]
    I find the pastrami to be the most sensual of all the salted, cured meats. (Seinfeld)

    Twitter: brbinchicago
  • Post #2 - September 22nd, 2014, 5:29 pm
    Post #2 - September 22nd, 2014, 5:29 pm Post #2 - September 22nd, 2014, 5:29 pm
    I've been watching all day for the first post on this topic as we live a block away from Baker Miller (thanks BR for the info and pics!). I did, however, get a glowing report from my wife who visited mid-morning today with our 3yo daughter. Although many items were already sold out, she raved about the sugar plum muffins and toasted sunflower bread (she said it was beautifully dense like the breads she loved when studying in Germany years ago). The best part: I've been informed that at least a few bites of butterscotch pie are waiting for me at home...
  • Post #3 - September 22nd, 2014, 7:24 pm
    Post #3 - September 22nd, 2014, 7:24 pm Post #3 - September 22nd, 2014, 7:24 pm
    BR wrote:There are a lot of excellent restaurants in Lincoln Square, but great coffee and baked goods have been sorely missing.

    Preach! In your face Logan Square! I wanted to check the place out on my way to work this morning, but the line was to the door. Maybe tomorrow I'll leave earlier ... your photos might be enough to motivate me to skip a couple snoozes.

    Btw, one of the articles mentioned that Baker Miller is using frozen unsaturated coconut oil instead of lard in their pie crusts, so that was the flavor you were detecting.
    The meal isn't over when I'm full; the meal is over when I hate myself. - Louis C.K.
  • Post #4 - September 24th, 2014, 11:27 am
    Post #4 - September 24th, 2014, 11:27 am Post #4 - September 24th, 2014, 11:27 am
    Wow. Very, very excited about this place!

    Absolutely lovely spot for sitting and enjoying breakfast or lunch. Tables are comfortable and not crammed in to the point that you couldn't have a conversation if you wanted and there is outdoor seating on a back patio and in front on benches. It really felt like I was in Door County or something--and nothing pretentious or fake about it.

    Sparrow coffee is wonderful--and this blend is exactly what I like--food friendly, medium bodied, smooth and nutty.

    And the food. This isn't just what Lincoln Square is missing---it's what Chicago is missing. A simple, perfect menu of farm fresh, deliciously homemade, unpretentious (even with the hand milled, locally sourced, etc. etc.), nicely portioned, no fuss food. I ate the savory hand pie of the day which was sausage and, I think, a bit of cheese, and half of the sweet plum muffin in the shop. Both were fantastic--the sausage in the pie tasted a bit like summer sausage--big, bold chunks layered into the dough--which was better than anything I remember from BBPC. The plums in the muffin were so juicy that they tasted almost like you were biting into a compote. I can't think of any muffin I've had like that--so good. Brought the butterscotch pie and the rest of the muffin home for later.

    While I was there, I saw plates of the grits and soft eggs and grain bowls (also with the egg) go by and I will be back for that. Maybe this week. They looked and smelled amazing.

    Finally, I couldn't resist sneaking a little sample from the toast bar--if you order toast (today's offerings were sourdough and sunflower), you have a selection of 2 homemade butters and a few jams to choose from. I admit to taking a tiny dab of both the salted butter and what looked like an herb butter of some kind and dipping the corners of my hand pie in them--incredible.

    Shop was nice and full at 10:30 and both Dave and Megan looked smiling, happy and proud. Happy for them--their success is definitely Lincoln Square's and Chicago's gain as well!
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #5 - September 24th, 2014, 2:12 pm
    Post #5 - September 24th, 2014, 2:12 pm Post #5 - September 24th, 2014, 2:12 pm
    I went in today also, but at about 1, they were out of the hand pies and muffins by then, but I got a loaf of the sunflower rye and two slices of the butterscotch pie which I'm saving for tonight. The bread was just out of the oven and she told me to let it cool before I cut it which I did, its pretty wonderful. I really love hearty whole grain breads and this will be paired with some smoked salmon I bought back from Ireland for dinner tonight. I think you already know what dessert will be.
    For what we choose is what we are. He should not miss this second opportunity to re-create himself with food. Jim Crace "The Devil's Larder"
  • Post #6 - September 25th, 2014, 8:01 pm
    Post #6 - September 25th, 2014, 8:01 pm Post #6 - September 25th, 2014, 8:01 pm
    I returned for lunch. Sadly, they were out of the chicken pot pie. Obviously, it's going to take some time for them to keep up with demand. Still, we ate well.

    We had the toast - two thick slices, one sourdough and one sunflower - and both were excellent. I didn't expect to enjoy the sunflower toast as much as I did (I have never loved sunflower seeds), but it truly was fantastic. The salted butter, herb butter, plum jam and raspberry jam were all excellent. I forgot to ask if they're churning their own butter.

    Image
    Sunflower and sourdough toast, butters, jams



    We also shared the grits bowl, which featured preserved tomato, charred onion, greens and a soft boiled egg that oozed lovely yolk onto the grits. The flavors were very nice (a healthy dose of pepper too), as was the texture of the grits. The grits themselves were pretty thick, and though I prefer my grits a thinned out a bit more than this, my dining companion loved them just as thick as they were.

    Image
    Grits bowl



    Finally, we shared the plum muffin and it was indeed delicious. In terms of flavor, it somewhat resembled a bran muffin, but better than any bran muffin I've ever tasted, and there was ample delicious plum throughout.

    Image
    Plum muffin



    As for the oatmeal crust on the butterscotch pie, I was told that there is no coconut itself in the crust, just the unsaturated coconut oil. Although I have little experience with this oil and its effect upon crust flavor, Megan mentioned that you might notice a very subtle coconut flavor when it's used. I certainly didn't notice it with the cheesecake pie, and to the extent I detected it with the butterscotch pie, it was very subtle. In any event, I'm still dreaming about that butterscotch pie -- fantastic! I'm thrilled to have this place around the corner from me, but yes, it's worth traveling for even if you're not as close.
    I find the pastrami to be the most sensual of all the salted, cured meats. (Seinfeld)

    Twitter: brbinchicago
  • Post #7 - September 26th, 2014, 11:41 am
    Post #7 - September 26th, 2014, 11:41 am Post #7 - September 26th, 2014, 11:41 am
    Signs in windows say they are closing at 3 pm every day until they can hire and train more employees.
  • Post #8 - September 28th, 2014, 5:36 am
    Post #8 - September 28th, 2014, 5:36 am Post #8 - September 28th, 2014, 5:36 am
    I am sitting eating a piece of their delicious sunflower seed bread right now...this place is the real deal

    I'm friendly with the Dave & Meghan, been to Bang Bang a number of times, and they had a dinner at my place. When I heard about the upcoming concept, I thought "wow, great gimmick guys - milling your own flour." (rolling eyes portlandia emoticon)

    However, after stopping by twice in their opening week and trying everything from the sugar plum muffins to the sunflower bread - I gotta say, way more to this than clever marketing. These baked goods just taste better! Their chocolate chip cookies have a texture to them (slightly coarse), it's very different - but the cookies taste wholesome and delicious, not just sweet/indulgent....same thing with the muffins - they aren't just loaded up with butter & sugar for the sake of being delicious. They are full of flavor, and taste well-crafted and full of heart.

    I remember when I was a kid, my grandma let us help her mill wheat into flour for baking - and her baked goods were amazing...Totally forgot those memories until these guys opened up, there's something to this concept - and I wholeheartedly approve!

    Will definitely be a frequent stop for me on my Western Ave. thoroughfare...
    I love comfortable food, and comfortable restaurants.
    http://www.bbqsupply.com
    http://thebudlong.com
    http://denveraf.com
  • Post #9 - October 2nd, 2014, 4:57 pm
    Post #9 - October 2nd, 2014, 4:57 pm Post #9 - October 2nd, 2014, 4:57 pm
    I paid my first visit to Baker Miller today, and I've got to say, I came away very impressed.

    Baker Miller Bakery & Millhouse
    Image

    The place smelled great when I walked in, but I resisted the siren song of the sweet pastries in order to sample their oatmeal made with rolled-in-house oats. What a revelation that bowl of oatmeal was! Freshly milled oatmeal is a completely different animal. I know the fad these days is to feature steel cut oats, but having grown up eating Quaker, I actually prefer rolled oats (not the instant kind that cooks up like glue; I'm talking about actual honest-to-goodness rolled oats), and this was the best bowl of oatmeal I've ever tasted.

    Baker Miller Oatmeal
    Image

    Although fully cooked, the oatmeal is served in a somewhat dry mass in the center of the plate; like a porridge. Today, it was topped with plum jam on half and something similar to a clotted cream on the other half. The cream had a real nice twang to it; similar to buttermilk. The entire thing was surrounded by a moat of warm milk, flecked with chopped toasted walnuts. After a sprinkle of brown sugar, I practically licked the plate clean. Dave, the owner, commented that either I was being very polite, or I really liked it. :wink:

    Afterward, Dave showed me the milling area at the back of the store. They were in the midst of milling some soft wheat flour for pastries.

    Baker Miller Millhouse
    Image

    All of the flour they make is whole grain flour. Here, Dave shows me the difference between the hard wheat they use for breads and savory items and the soft wheat they use for biscuits and pastry flour.

    Baker Miller Hard Wheat Berries
    Image

    Baker Miller Soft Wheat Berries
    Image

    My only minor complaint is that when the mills are running, it's pretty loud in there...and those mills are running a LOT to keep up with demand. I understand plans are underway to find another location to do the milling. That will let them both address the noise in the store and turn out a much bigger volume of flour. Right now, they are having a hard time just keeping up with their own needs and I know they want to start selling the flour retail in their shop as well as in other area stores.

    Baker Miller Bakery & Millhouse
    4610 N. Western Ave.
    Chicago, IL 60625
    No Phone - No WiFi
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #10 - October 2nd, 2014, 7:10 pm
    Post #10 - October 2nd, 2014, 7:10 pm Post #10 - October 2nd, 2014, 7:10 pm
    When I was in, they were selling bags of both --don't recall the exact price but I want to say it was around $10-12 maybe? Hopefully someone can confIrm. They were right at the register.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #11 - October 3rd, 2014, 2:49 pm
    Post #11 - October 3rd, 2014, 2:49 pm Post #11 - October 3rd, 2014, 2:49 pm
    JustJoan bought some flour there today, so perhaps she'll chime in.
    Ms. Ingie
    Life is too short, why skip dessert?
  • Post #12 - October 3rd, 2014, 3:49 pm
    Post #12 - October 3rd, 2014, 3:49 pm Post #12 - October 3rd, 2014, 3:49 pm
    Jared, Amanda and I had our Friday Windy City BBQ Classic meeting at Baker Miller today. We cut a wide swath through the menu, three kinds of pie, oatmeal, cookie, grits, toast, coffee, orange juice and I was mildly flabbergasted as to how much I liked everything tried.

    Dave and Megan are not only walking the walk, they are taking it one step further and milling the concert for the steps.


    Dave & Megan
    FullSizeRender.jpg Baker Miller


    Baker Miller Bakery & Millhouse, count me a fan!
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #13 - October 3rd, 2014, 4:28 pm
    Post #13 - October 3rd, 2014, 4:28 pm Post #13 - October 3rd, 2014, 4:28 pm
    Ha. I happened to stroll in for some grits and toast when GWiv and Jared were talking BBQ. What a cool spot. And Anson Mills has nothing on Dave & Megan in the grits department. They are using a blend of Illinois-grown heirloom maizes that strikes the perfect balance of rough and smooth. Grits being my single favorite food, and Chicago not being much of a grits town (better than NY and LA, but that's not saying much), I can't contain my excitement about having such high quality mush near my home.

    And these guys could teach our many new ramen makers something about soft boiled (er, "molten") eggs - with runny yolks that are not ice cold.
    Last edited by JeffB on October 4th, 2014, 6:58 am, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #14 - October 3rd, 2014, 4:58 pm
    Post #14 - October 3rd, 2014, 4:58 pm Post #14 - October 3rd, 2014, 4:58 pm
    JeffB wrote:And these guys could teach our many new ramen makers something about soft boiled (er, "molten") eggs - with runny yolks that are not ice cold.


    My particular nemesis.
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #15 - October 3rd, 2014, 7:44 pm
    Post #15 - October 3rd, 2014, 7:44 pm Post #15 - October 3rd, 2014, 7:44 pm
    JeffB wrote:I happened to stroll in for some gits and toast ...

    Sorry, but this just made me laugh out loud.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #16 - October 4th, 2014, 6:47 am
    Post #16 - October 4th, 2014, 6:47 am Post #16 - October 4th, 2014, 6:47 am
    boudreaulicious wrote:When I was in, they were selling bags of both --don't recall the exact price but I want to say it was around $10-12 maybe? Hopefully someone can confIrm. They were right at the register.


    the bags were $5 each, and that is for 1 pound. oops, this is for the pastry floor, not the wheat berries.
    Last edited by justjoan on October 12th, 2014, 2:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #17 - October 4th, 2014, 11:08 am
    Post #17 - October 4th, 2014, 11:08 am Post #17 - October 4th, 2014, 11:08 am
    i stopped by yesterday; also ran into gwiv, rubbbq and spouse. the millers sent me home with some flour samples, which i'll be experimenting with tomorrow for the dessert exchange. i share stevez's love for the butterscotch pie- really awesome. i took home a hand pie, which i reheated for supper. i'm pretty sure it was described as chorizo inside. the sausage was fine, but it was the very dark browned pastry that was the real treat. so many bakers don't brown their pastries enough. that is when the miracle happens and the crust develops flavor. fantastic hand pie. can't wait to try their grits (though i don't want an egg on mine(!) and their oatmeal.
  • Post #18 - October 4th, 2014, 2:18 pm
    Post #18 - October 4th, 2014, 2:18 pm Post #18 - October 4th, 2014, 2:18 pm
    I've now had all four of their current pies, and I really think they're all fantastic, but if I had to rank them: 1) butterscotch, 2) apple, 3) salted caramel cheesecake, 4) chocolate cream. Too bad that I have to rank the chocolate cream pie last because it's fantastic -- dark, rich, smooth chocolate custard and a fantastic crust. Their worst pie would be most bakeries' best!

    I hope everyone realizes they're selling Sparrow coffee, and at what, $2.50 for a small cup? I'm on cloud 9 with coffee this good in the neighborhood and their blend is really terrific. On warmer days, I've enjoyed the iced coffee, but I really can't go in without getting a cup. They also have the wonderful Rare Tea Cellar tea, but I've yet to move off of the coffee.

    Now, the bread. When I had the toast, I loved both the sunflower and sourdough, but preferred the sunflower. I just picked up a loaf of the sourdough to take home and wow is it wonderful. They're obviously using a very well fed starter because it delivers quite the nice tang. Interestingly it's moister than most sourdoughs I'm used to -- just different. But the crust, crumb: perfection! And the tang from the sourdough just blends extraordinarily well with butter and jam. This is what I'm talking about:


    Image


    Image
    I find the pastrami to be the most sensual of all the salted, cured meats. (Seinfeld)

    Twitter: brbinchicago
  • Post #19 - October 7th, 2014, 9:25 am
    Post #19 - October 7th, 2014, 9:25 am Post #19 - October 7th, 2014, 9:25 am
    justjoan wrote:i stopped by yesterday; also ran into gwiv, rubbbq and spouse.


    heh i thought i saw some LTHers while I was there. I was tucked in the back devouring my oatmeal.
  • Post #20 - October 7th, 2014, 2:23 pm
    Post #20 - October 7th, 2014, 2:23 pm Post #20 - October 7th, 2014, 2:23 pm
    We were very disappointed they had sold out of all the bread by noon on Sunday. The oatmeal was good though.
  • Post #21 - October 7th, 2014, 2:46 pm
    Post #21 - October 7th, 2014, 2:46 pm Post #21 - October 7th, 2014, 2:46 pm
    so, i made rhubarb-peach hand pies from the sifted whole grain pastry flour that the millers kindly gave me to try. you can see pictures of the hand pies in the dessert exchange thread, if you're interested. for comparison's sake, i made half a batch of pies with unbleached ceresota flour. the white flour was a little easier to roll out and the whole grain pies took longer to bake. but they were delicious, and more flavorful than the white flour ones. these were not the heavy, whole wheat sort of pies i would have expected from regular whole wheat flour. what a great product to have in chicago; all the nutritional goodness of a whole grain flour without the heavy, dry taste. thanks millers!
  • Post #22 - October 7th, 2014, 4:49 pm
    Post #22 - October 7th, 2014, 4:49 pm Post #22 - October 7th, 2014, 4:49 pm
    justjoan wrote:so, i made rhubarb-peach hand pies from the sifted whole grain pastry flour that the millers kindly gave me to try. you can see pictures of the hand pies in the dessert exchange thread, if you're interested. for comparison's sake, i made half a batch of pies with unbleached ceresota flour. the white flour was a little easier to roll out and the whole grain pies took longer to bake. but they were delicious, and more flavorful than the white flour ones. these were not the heavy, whole wheat sort of pies i would have expected from regular whole wheat flour. what a great product to have in chicago; all the nutritional goodness of a whole grain flour without the heavy, dry taste. thanks millers!


    Agreed. I stay clear of more than an ounce of whole wheat flour in sweet baked goods because I find it tends to change not only the texture but also impart a distinctive nutty flavor. I am not big on nuts.

    Joan's hand pies looked "sturdy" but they were just as light as I would expect from a white, and bleached, flour. They were delicious.
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #23 - October 10th, 2014, 11:21 am
    Post #23 - October 10th, 2014, 11:21 am Post #23 - October 10th, 2014, 11:21 am
    i had baker millers' grits for breakfast this morning (though, since they were cooked in cream, it'll hold me past lunchtime). they were fantastic- a fine ground mix of different colored corn- i've never seen anything like it. i was shocked to discover the cooking time is only 10 minutes. i've bought grits by mail order from the south over the years, and they never taste good unless they're cooked a really long time. baker miller serves the grits with tomato water , a soft boiled egg, and pickled kale. dave miller explained his rationale for balancing the various flavors; but i think he underestimates the deliciousness of the grits eaten all on their own. . IMO, the kale didn't improve them, but rather distracted from the grits. the addition of the tomato was fine; and i didn't dislike the egg, but i really just want grits in my grits. i bought a 1# container, for $6 and i'll make them my way next time (cooked in 1/2 water, 1/2 milk). i love what this place is doing and can't wait to try the oatmeal on my next visit. at 9am this morning there were people eating, but no problem getting a seat. the staff is as friendly as can be and the rare cellars english breakfast tea hit the spot.
  • Post #24 - October 12th, 2014, 12:37 pm
    Post #24 - October 12th, 2014, 12:37 pm Post #24 - October 12th, 2014, 12:37 pm
    if anyone's interested... here's my report on cooking these grits at home (btw, they are RED, BLUE AND YELLOW). i weighed out 3oz. and cooked them in 1-2/3 cups of liquid-half milk and half water. i added lots of salt and pepper. at first, they are just lost in all that liquid, but i stirred them over a medium-low fire (in a heavy calphalon small saucepan), until they thickened. i lowered the heat and cooked a total time of 20 minutes. after 10 minutes, they weren't tender enough for me. these were very thick; more liquid can be added after they thicken up, if you like them looser. at baker/miller, after the 10 minute cooking time, they're kept warm in a slow cooker, so i suspect no one really eats them after just 10 minutes. but they definitely don't need the long cooking time i'm used to with southern grits. which is great news for when i want a fast bowl of grits. i added a pat of butter to them off heat. this was too large a serving for me. next time i'll use 3 oz. but they do reheat nicely in the microwave, so i never throw out extra cooked grits. THEY TASTED GREAT- A MUCH MORE COMPLEX FLAVOR AND TEXTURE THAN plain white grits.
    i've edited this to add that i used 3 OUNCES, not 4. and 3 OUNCES OF GRITS BY WEIGHT EQUALS 1/2 cup, for those of you w/o a scale...
    Last edited by justjoan on October 18th, 2014, 7:24 am, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #25 - October 12th, 2014, 1:47 pm
    Post #25 - October 12th, 2014, 1:47 pm Post #25 - October 12th, 2014, 1:47 pm
    Joan,

    I wonder how the extra grits would be if they were chilled and then fried up like polenta cakes.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #26 - October 12th, 2014, 2:20 pm
    Post #26 - October 12th, 2014, 2:20 pm Post #26 - October 12th, 2014, 2:20 pm
    stevez wrote:Joan,

    I wonder how the extra grits would be if they were chilled and then fried up like polenta cakes.

    it sounds great; i'll try it soon and post about the results. unless you beat me to it, steve.
  • Post #27 - October 13th, 2014, 9:07 am
    Post #27 - October 13th, 2014, 9:07 am Post #27 - October 13th, 2014, 9:07 am
    Made my first visit to BMB&M yesterday morning, and everything was excellent. As already noted earlier, both the plum muffin and butterscotch pie were top notch.

    However, the item that probably made the greatest impression on me was their version of a cinnamon roll, not yet mentioned in this thread. I don't know if this is a weekend-only item or they just started making them, but it was the perfect combo of roll, cinnamon syrup swirl, and icing. Stylewise, not a traditional cinnamon roll, but certainly the best one I've ever had.

    This will now be my go-to spot for weekend breakfast for out-of-town friends, and I'm driving over from Edgewater.

    Sorry, no photos.
  • Post #28 - October 20th, 2014, 8:32 pm
    Post #28 - October 20th, 2014, 8:32 pm Post #28 - October 20th, 2014, 8:32 pm
    I finally had the oatmeal this past Saturday and it is really sensational. It's not just that the oatmeal is great. It's the little bit of sour/clotted cream, the plum jam, the milk and toasted nuts -- it's a remarkably fantastic combination and just the perfect ratio of ingredients and thankfully just barely sweet enough. Never before in my life have I had any excitement with oatmeal and I never believed I would. Wow!
    I find the pastrami to be the most sensual of all the salted, cured meats. (Seinfeld)

    Twitter: brbinchicago
  • Post #29 - October 25th, 2014, 8:47 am
    Post #29 - October 25th, 2014, 8:47 am Post #29 - October 25th, 2014, 8:47 am
    Stopped in for the first time this AM. There appears to be an hours change--closed M and T, but open later W-Su.

    The caramelized onion and cheese (havarti?) hand pie is outstanding. Flaky, sweet, savory, and satisfying.
  • Post #30 - October 25th, 2014, 3:21 pm
    Post #30 - October 25th, 2014, 3:21 pm Post #30 - October 25th, 2014, 3:21 pm
    baker millers' hours have changed considerably. as mentioned above, now closed BOTH monday and tuesday.here are the considerably expanded hours: 7:30-7:30, wednesday thru friday. saturday and sunday, still 8-3pm. still no phone, alas.

    edited to correct hours
    Last edited by justjoan on October 25th, 2014, 4:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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