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Galit: Israeli in Lincoln Park

Galit: Israeli in Lincoln Park
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  • Galit: Israeli in Lincoln Park

    Post #1 - September 18th, 2018, 11:27 am
    Post #1 - September 18th, 2018, 11:27 am Post #1 - September 18th, 2018, 11:27 am
    One of my favorite meals in recent memory was dinner at Shaya in New Orleans. Looks like its former chef Zach Engel is moving our way with a new Israeli restaurant, Galit:

    https://chicago.eater.com/2018/9/18/178 ... ew-orleans

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/dining/ct ... story.html

    Galit
    2429 N. Lincoln Ave.
  • Post #2 - September 18th, 2018, 11:39 am
    Post #2 - September 18th, 2018, 11:39 am Post #2 - September 18th, 2018, 11:39 am
    Vitesse98 wrote:One of my favorite meals in recent memory was dinner at Shaya in New Orleans. Looks like its former chef Zach Engel is moving our way with a new Israeli restaurant, Galit:

    https://chicago.eater.com/2018/9/18/178 ... ew-orleans

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/dining/ct ... story.html

    Galit
    2429 N. Lincoln Ave.


    Fantastic news. My meal at Shaya in April was incredible! I left thinking why don't we have a place like this in Chicago...
  • Post #3 - April 1st, 2019, 6:58 am
    Post #3 - April 1st, 2019, 6:58 am Post #3 - April 1st, 2019, 6:58 am
    Galit (2429 N. Lincoln Ave.), the eagerly awaited restaurant by Zach Engel and Andres Clavero, will open its doors on Wednesday.

    https://www.chicagotribune.com/dining/c ... story.html
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #4 - April 2nd, 2019, 8:15 pm
    Post #4 - April 2nd, 2019, 8:15 pm Post #4 - April 2nd, 2019, 8:15 pm
    "Israeli" could mean many things - I'm curious if the restaurant is at all Kosher in any way? Doesn't look like it, but interested in general.
  • Post #5 - April 2nd, 2019, 8:34 pm
    Post #5 - April 2nd, 2019, 8:34 pm Post #5 - April 2nd, 2019, 8:34 pm
    marothisu wrote:"Israeli" could mean many things - I'm curious if the restaurant is at all Kosher in any way? Doesn't look like it, but interested in general.

    I am so excited about this opening! At first glance of the opening menu on the website, there does not appear to be any obvious treif, although there is a mix of milk and meat, such as lamb with labneh. It seems that there will be plenty to eat for anyone who keeps kosher at home but eats at non-kosher restaurants, also for people with other dietary preferences. Welcome to Chicago, and congratulations to team Galit!
  • Post #6 - April 3rd, 2019, 6:50 am
    Post #6 - April 3rd, 2019, 6:50 am Post #6 - April 3rd, 2019, 6:50 am
    marothisu wrote:"Israeli" could mean many things


    "Israeli" is Israeli. You're not assured of walking into a kosher restaurant in Israel. Although more restaurants have been going kosher in recent years, the majority are still not.
  • Post #7 - April 3rd, 2019, 1:38 pm
    Post #7 - April 3rd, 2019, 1:38 pm Post #7 - April 3rd, 2019, 1:38 pm
    From Eater:

    "It’s important to acknowledge these different forms, Engel said, this way no single person or culture could pretend that they invented a dish. Galit intends to celebrate the different iterations and cultures."

    Translation: don't listen to Palestinians who claim that these dishes are appropriated.

    Wish them luck, I guess.
    "By the fig, the olive..." Surat Al-Teen, Mecca 95:1"
  • Post #8 - April 3rd, 2019, 2:49 pm
    Post #8 - April 3rd, 2019, 2:49 pm Post #8 - April 3rd, 2019, 2:49 pm
    Habibi wrote:From Eater:

    "It’s important to acknowledge these different forms, Engel said, this way no single person or culture could pretend that they invented a dish. Galit intends to celebrate the different iterations and cultures."

    Translation: don't listen to Palestinians who claim that these dishes are appropriated.

    Wish them luck, I guess.

    everyone appropriates. it's the nature of cooking. some see it as an affront. others, not so much.
  • Post #9 - April 3rd, 2019, 3:07 pm
    Post #9 - April 3rd, 2019, 3:07 pm Post #9 - April 3rd, 2019, 3:07 pm
    Habibi wrote:From Eater:

    "It’s important to acknowledge these different forms, Engel said, this way no single person or culture could pretend that they invented a dish. Galit intends to celebrate the different iterations and cultures."

    Translation: don't listen to Palestinians who claim that these dishes are appropriated.

    Wish them luck, I guess.


    That's an oddly specific interpretation considering the quoted language followed a reference to Iraqi cuisine.
  • Post #10 - April 3rd, 2019, 3:21 pm
    Post #10 - April 3rd, 2019, 3:21 pm Post #10 - April 3rd, 2019, 3:21 pm
    spinynorman99 wrote:
    Habibi wrote:From Eater:

    "It’s important to acknowledge these different forms, Engel said, this way no single person or culture could pretend that they invented a dish. Galit intends to celebrate the different iterations and cultures."

    Translation: don't listen to Palestinians who claim that these dishes are appropriated.

    Wish them luck, I guess.


    That's an oddly specific interpretation considering the quoted language followed a reference to Iraqi cuisine.


    Notably in the Eater article it's not a direct quote, so we'd be guessing at context anyway. It seems in any case an unnecessary remark by Engel. Why worry about regionalism or postregionalism when you can just call everything Mediterranean Fresh TM anyway.
  • Post #11 - April 3rd, 2019, 5:11 pm
    Post #11 - April 3rd, 2019, 5:11 pm Post #11 - April 3rd, 2019, 5:11 pm
    spinynorman99 wrote:
    marothisu wrote:"Israeli" could mean many things


    "Israeli" is Israeli. You're not assured of walking into a kosher restaurant in Israel. Although more restaurants have been going kosher in recent years, the majority are still not.


    Yes, that was my point. It could mean a lot of things and not guaranteed. I was wondering if they were going for a certain interpretation of Israeli over another.

    spinynorman99 wrote:That's an oddly specific interpretation considering the quoted language followed a reference to Iraqi cuisine.


    What are you getting at? Not all Jews are Europeans, contrary to popular belief. There's a quarter million Iraqi Jews in what is known as Israel today. Baghdad in the early 20th century was 1/3 Jewish basically until around WW2. This isn't counting all the other countries in the Middle East and North Africa that used to have sizable populations until around WW2. Interestingly I was talking about this with a coworker of mine who is from Syria (been in the US for maybe 5 years), who basically had no idea of the history and said they took efforts when he was growing up to erase/not teach it to them.

    It's a touchy subject and we could get into a lot of political things, like how the european Jews have appropriated certain dishes and wrongly called it their own, but for some of the actual legitimate mizrachi Jews, these dishes could have been part of their families for centuries. And then how those people are treated as lesser in Israel sometimes and that the Europeans try and assert their dominance over other groups. But anyway..

    It's a mess of a subject we probably shouldn't get into :D
  • Post #12 - April 3rd, 2019, 5:34 pm
    Post #12 - April 3rd, 2019, 5:34 pm Post #12 - April 3rd, 2019, 5:34 pm
    oh those horrible european jews. when they weren't being victimized in pogroms or concentration camps, they were off stealing recipes. fuckers!
  • Post #13 - April 3rd, 2019, 6:13 pm
    Post #13 - April 3rd, 2019, 6:13 pm Post #13 - April 3rd, 2019, 6:13 pm
    marothisu wrote:
    spinynorman99 wrote:
    marothisu wrote:"Israeli" could mean many things


    "Israeli" is Israeli. You're not assured of walking into a kosher restaurant in Israel. Although more restaurants have been going kosher in recent years, the majority are still not.


    Yes, that was my point. It could mean a lot of things and not guaranteed. I was wondering if they were going for a certain interpretation of Israeli over another.

    spinynorman99 wrote:That's an oddly specific interpretation considering the quoted language followed a reference to Iraqi cuisine.


    What are you getting at? Not all Jews are Europeans, contrary to popular belief. There's a quarter million Iraqi Jews in what is known as Israel today. Baghdad in the early 20th century was 1/3 Jewish basically until around WW2. This isn't counting all the other countries in the Middle East and North Africa that used to have sizable populations until around WW2. Interestingly I was talking about this with a coworker of mine who is from Syria (been in the US for maybe 5 years), who basically had no idea of the history and said they took efforts when he was growing up to erase/not teach it to them.

    It's a touchy subject and we could get into a lot of political things, like how the european Jews have appropriated certain dishes and wrongly called it their own, but for some of the actual legitimate mizrachi Jews, these dishes could have been part of their families for centuries. And then how those people are treated as lesser in Israel sometimes and that the Europeans try and assert their dominance over other groups. But anyway..

    It's a mess of a subject we probably shouldn't get into :D


    Oy, what a tempest in a teapot. My comment was to Habibi who somehow interjected a political brouhaha into a fairly innocuous comment about how there are regional variations of foods that are claimed by the various Middle Eastern countries, with a reference to Iraq.

    In Albany Park/Budlong Woods alone you can find Syrian/Lebanese/Iraqi/Jordanian/Egyptian variations on pretty much the same menu items in their respective restaurants. It's not as if any country lays claim to a falafel or hummus.

    As for what Galit is about, just look at the lineage, Zahav in Philly begat Shaya in New Orleans which is Galit's inspiration. The Ottolenghi influence as well as Eyal Shani's expanding empire (2 Miznon's in NYC, as well as in Vienna, Paris and Melbourne) are all bringing fresh interpretations of Middle Eastern dishes. It's been done with other cuisines for decades now.
  • Post #14 - April 3rd, 2019, 6:30 pm
    Post #14 - April 3rd, 2019, 6:30 pm Post #14 - April 3rd, 2019, 6:30 pm
    Clarence Beeks wrote:oh those horrible european jews. when they weren't being victimized in pogroms or concentration camps, they were off stealing recipes. fuckers!


    For the record I am a European (including Sephardic) Jew (though not practicing religiously at the moment).

    spinynorman99 wrote:Oy, what a tempest in a teapot. My comment was to Habibi who somehow interjected a political brouhaha into a fairly innocuous comment about how there are regional variations of foods that are claimed by the various Middle Eastern countries, with a reference to Iraq.

    In Albany Park/Budlong Woods alone you can find Syrian/Lebanese/Iraqi/Jordanian/Egyptian variations on pretty much the same menu items in their respective restaurants. It's not as if any country lays claim to a falafel or hummus.

    As for what Galit is about, just look at the lineage, Zahav in Philly begat Shaya in New Orleans which is Galit's inspiration. The Ottolenghi influence as well as Eyal Shani's expanding empire (2 Miznon's in NYC, as well as in Vienna, Paris and Melbourne) are all bringing fresh interpretations of Middle Eastern dishes. It's been done with other cuisines for decades now.


    Yes, I know that. You will find a lot of interesting things with regards to food appropriation. Some people don't seem to care (my Syrian co-worker for example has said many times he finds it funny/sad when his friends get into arguments about who invented hummus).

    Food as we all know is part of history and follows many types of history (conquering, trading, etc). It's fascinating but unfortunately it's the story of all sorts of food in history whether it's in this realm or people thinking Italy is the birthplace of the noodle even though it was really invented (well at least the earliest evidence from 4000 years ago) in the Qinghai province in China.


    As for this specific restaurant - the pictures of the food look pretty good and I wish them great luck. I'll be trying it sometime in the near future. There are a few similar-ish restaurants in NYC and I know about the one in Philadelphia, though never tried it.
  • Post #15 - April 4th, 2019, 11:04 am
    Post #15 - April 4th, 2019, 11:04 am Post #15 - April 4th, 2019, 11:04 am
    I know about the one in Philadelphia, though never tried it.
    Zahav is one of the best restaurants in the country, full stop.
  • Post #16 - April 4th, 2019, 5:35 pm
    Post #16 - April 4th, 2019, 5:35 pm Post #16 - April 4th, 2019, 5:35 pm
    I have no strong feelings about the above discussion (particularly on a food forum that I want to take the time to type out)....BUT....

    I do have a reservation here tomorrow and will report back. I am intrigued since in addition to the menu, they apparently also offer some sort of coursed-out selection of dishes which sound like it might be at the whim of the chef. We might be going for that since it is just two of us, and I feel like it is hard to really make a good dent in a menu that is small-plate focused.
  • Post #17 - April 4th, 2019, 6:09 pm
    Post #17 - April 4th, 2019, 6:09 pm Post #17 - April 4th, 2019, 6:09 pm
    We're going on Saturday. Can't wait!
  • Post #18 - April 5th, 2019, 1:04 pm
    Post #18 - April 5th, 2019, 1:04 pm Post #18 - April 5th, 2019, 1:04 pm
    Picture copy of the menu (not sure full menu) with prices posted on yelp here:
    https://s3-media2.fl.yelpcdn.com/bphoto ... sWHw/o.jpg
  • Post #19 - April 6th, 2019, 7:06 pm
    Post #19 - April 6th, 2019, 7:06 pm Post #19 - April 6th, 2019, 7:06 pm
    I had a small, but very enjoyable meal here. You can tell the place just opened, as they have way too many staff members who are almost annoyingly prompt with service. Four people at the host station to receive each guest, for instance. I don't think our water glasses every got more than 1-sip-below-full before getting refilled by what seemed like a small army of men carrying water pitchers wandering around the restaurant. But clearly everyone is trying very hard, and to their credit, the restaurant did not suffer from any first week jitters. Service was smooth, everything came out promptly with proper gaps between dishes, everything was hot, nothing was forgotten.

    I was overall very impressed by the place and I have never been to a restaurant quite like this, doing high end but very simple middle eastern food.

    I am anything but an expert in the food and I've never traveled to this region, but the falafel were easily the best I've ever had - bright green, herbal, fluffy on the inside, crunchy on the outside. The hummus was easily the best I've ever had - incredibly smooth and creamy and a nice bite from the aleppo pepper.

    We also had the Salatim, which are basically a series of spreads like mezze. They served a really thick, rich lebneh and cippolini onions with feta - those were the highlights.

    We also had the steak, which was a hangar-like cut (menu didn't specify) served with "schmaltzy" crispy potatoes - which were a little under seasoned and not schmaltzy enough for my taste...probably the only minor improvement I could mention the food needing.

    Cocktails were just alright, and I think the program (at least my very limited tasting of it) needs a little improvement. I had a old fashioned variant with bourbon some nut-flavored bitters (if memory serves) and tahini. The drink itself was a little sweet (not too much so, though I thought it could use a little more back bone) but interestingly was served in a glass with finely crushed ice. I was puzzled by this choice since I felt it wasn't appropriate for this style of drink and diluted things way too quickly, especially when you're dining and maybe taking a long time to finish a given drink. It quickly became watery...so of course the only solution was that I drank it quickly - problem solved! I ordered another and asked them to pour it over a large cube of ice I saw in another guests drink - the waiter responded that he would have to see if the bartender was able to do that (I stifled an eye roll, since this was after all their 3rd night of service...but certainly the bartender could muster the ability to pour the same drink over a different shape of ice they already had on hand, upon request). I was in luck and the bartender made it happen! In my view, the drink was much more enjoyable in this format.

    The wife had their negroni riff which was really tasty and a little herbal - very interesting and also very beautiful, mostly clear with just a hint of red...almost like a clarified negroni or something. She also had a mocktail (from a menu section of mocktails) that she found overly sweet and boring.

    By no means were the drinks boring or bad, but I'd say they weren't as enjoyable as the food. It sounds like this place also really prides itself in its wine list and they offered to have their somm to stop by and discuss any wine questions we had. We weren't in a wine mood, but maybe that's their strength over cocktails. I will have to go back and see!
  • Post #20 - April 6th, 2019, 9:14 pm
    Post #20 - April 6th, 2019, 9:14 pm Post #20 - April 6th, 2019, 9:14 pm
    Thank you for the detailed write up. Did they offer a desert menu? And how was parking in the area?
  • Post #21 - April 6th, 2019, 10:22 pm
    Post #21 - April 6th, 2019, 10:22 pm Post #21 - April 6th, 2019, 10:22 pm
    Went tonight as well. Falafel was moist and herbal on the inside, super crunchy outside. Pita was denser than expected but somehow still light and delcious. Had 2 of the hummus dishes, masabacha (cooked whole chickpeas with a green tehina) and the smoked brisket (perfect, not too much smoke) -both excellent. Salads were very good, the onions with feta and brussel sprouts with orange blossom were especially good. The shakshuka had a nice hint of smoke and perfectly cooked eggs (creamy runny yolk) and came with a garlicky laffa - really delicious. Sad to say I only brought one stomach with me so there are about 5 or 6 other things I wanted to try -- for next time. Very vegetarian-friendly, as this cuisine should be. As for desserts, there were 3, a homemade krembo (a ubiquitous Mallomar-y confection) and can't recall the other 2.

    Will definitely be back. This is a niche that needed to be filled.

    I also need to point out that the service was very attentive and helpful. Good recommendations on quantity. Came by at just the right times. And the staff in the open kitchen seemed to interact with wordless familiarity.
  • Post #22 - April 7th, 2019, 8:53 pm
    Post #22 - April 7th, 2019, 8:53 pm Post #22 - April 7th, 2019, 8:53 pm
    I went on Thursday night. Food was good (enough) not remarkable. A bit pricey for Chicago. Service was somewhat spotty but that can be forgiven because it was only their second night. I certainly wouldn’t call the restaurant “high end”—modest decor obviously done on a budget and items like hummus of a few varieties, falafel, one steak, etc. All in all I’d go if I lived in the ‘hood but I wouldn’t consider it a destination restaurant. Quick pointer. If they try to seat you in the back room (which doubles as a private room) politely decline unless you don’t care if your hearing gets damaged from noise or not. Equivalent of (at most) one NYT star.
  • Post #23 - April 8th, 2019, 10:22 pm
    Post #23 - April 8th, 2019, 10:22 pm Post #23 - April 8th, 2019, 10:22 pm
    We're going on Sunday! My wife is Israeli, so she has high standards when it comes to this cuisine.
  • Post #24 - April 14th, 2019, 10:14 am
    Post #24 - April 14th, 2019, 10:14 am Post #24 - April 14th, 2019, 10:14 am
    We went last night. We ate well.

    The food was delicious.

    The vibe was hip in a ”I woke up like this” manner, but it’s the midwest so they accommodate high chairs. In other words, you are fine in jeans and trainers but if you have a blazer on no big deal. Perfect for those hitting a show next door at Victory Gardens or across the street at Lincoln Hall. Bass was prominent in hip hop and R & B rhythms on the speaker.

    I will include more thoughts later but MrPairs4life’s stuffed cabbage with ground lamb looked especially lovely!

    The labneh on the mezze plate with pita was glorious.

    The falafel was among the best I have ever had that I didn't make myself.
    It also comes with a ”Lincoln Park” price, $12 for 3.

    You do need to order everything except the Last Course at the beginning per our server. So none of this, throw some apps and drinks in to start and let me catch up with my dining companion before ordering the main. This didn't bug me but you may want to spend time with the menu before your arrival if you are hungry.

    Here’s a link to pics on Instagram. https://instagram.com/p/BwNvLgwHR3Z/
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #25 - April 14th, 2019, 1:44 pm
    Post #25 - April 14th, 2019, 1:44 pm Post #25 - April 14th, 2019, 1:44 pm
    pairs4life wrote:You do need to order everything except the Last Course at the beginning per our server. So none of this, throw some apps and drinks in to start and let me catch up with my dining companion before ordering the main. This didn't bug me but you may want to spend time with the menu before your arrival if you are hungry.

    Here’s a link to pics on Instagram. https://instagram.com/p/BwNvLgwHR3Z/


    Are you saying that if you wanted to order more non-dessert food after finishing your original order, they wouldn’t allow it?
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #26 - April 14th, 2019, 2:00 pm
    Post #26 - April 14th, 2019, 2:00 pm Post #26 - April 14th, 2019, 2:00 pm
    boudreaulicious wrote:
    pairs4life wrote:You do need to order everything except the Last Course at the beginning per our server. So none of this, throw some apps and drinks in to start and let me catch up with my dining companion before ordering the main. This didn't bug me but you may want to spend time with the menu before your arrival if you are hungry.

    Here’s a link to pics on Instagram. https://instagram.com/p/BwNvLgwHR3Z/


    Are you saying that if you wanted to order more non-dessert food after finishing your original order, they wouldn’t allow it?


    No. I am saying that your order for food goes in one time, at the start, no ordering apps and drinks, then later ordering main dishes. What happens after your original order before dessert, if you want more food I don't know.
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #27 - May 1st, 2019, 9:15 am
    Post #27 - May 1st, 2019, 9:15 am Post #27 - May 1st, 2019, 9:15 am
    I went as a party of four last night, so we got to try a good portion of the menu. Overall, I would say very good, if not perfect.

    The tehina hummus was a highlight of the dinner. It was very rich, very creamy and disappeared fast. The the light and airy pita was hot out of the oven. One quibble is that they provided one piece of it, which is awkward with four people.

    We also ordered the Salatim, which included five small dishes--a couple of tablespoons of each spread and a slighly more generous serving of the vegetables. They were delicious--especially the labneh and ezme--but at $22, I wanted to be wowed and it didn't feel like a generous spread.

    Another highlight was the Kubaneh--which the waitress described as like a croissant, but was more like monkey bread. It was delicious. The whole wheat yeast dough was twisted with fat (they said margarine) and had crispy edges. It made me google recipes when I got home. So good.

    The butternut bazhe followed. It had a lot of cardamom, which was met with mixed reviews at the table. It's a strong flavor and I wish it had been listed on the menu. (Cilantro haters beware--it made surprise appearances in several dishes). The beets were also a highlight, sitting on a rich tehini and sprinkled with pumpernickel. The shakshukah was good too--heavy with dill. It came with another large piece of bread. (We over-ordered dishes with bread). The steak disappeared so fast that I didn't think to ask how it was.

    Overall, I had mixed reactions, some that weren't the fault of the restaurant. So many middle eastern restaurants are so much cheaper and serve excellent food. This was elevated with thought and care put into each dish, but still casual. If it were fancier, or even more casual, it may have hit a better note for me. As it was, I quibbled over the portion sizes and unexpected spices. This isn't totally fair and a reflection of my putting the restaurant in a "middle eastern restaurant" box. The food was interesting and I was delighted with the bread and spreads. It stands up favorably to places like the Warbler and other small plate mid-fancy restaurants.

    It was a very good meal and I'd go again--especially since it's near Victory Gardens and there aren't a lot of options in that area.
  • Post #28 - May 2nd, 2019, 9:26 pm
    Post #28 - May 2nd, 2019, 9:26 pm Post #28 - May 2nd, 2019, 9:26 pm
    I thought flavors and service on an initial visit were intense and wonderful, but that portions are a bit too precious and dear to make me repeat soon, and I'm not sure more dining companions would necessarily make the experience much better since it would be hard to get more than a small bite or schmear of anything we saw up and down the bar split beyond half.

    This said, the masabacha-fresh pita combo really was the nicest I've had outside of the Old City, and the kubbeh halab - fried lamb kibbeh in a barely-there risotto-like crust on a sweet fruit paste - was perfectly executed, with some notably pungent dill. I liked the design of the drink menu though the cocktails, non-alcoholic potions, and wines we sampled all trended very sweet. It's pretty fare served on stoneware and for the right light night out I'd go back - I just know I'll be at Damascus Falafel, Kabob Q, The Nile, Kabobi, Al Bawadi, and Salaam sooner.

    Image

    Image
  • Post #29 - May 6th, 2019, 2:16 pm
    Post #29 - May 6th, 2019, 2:16 pm Post #29 - May 6th, 2019, 2:16 pm
    I'll post photos later, but the S/O and I went last night and thoroughly enjoyed our meal and thought it was well-priced.

    The single brightest highlight was the wonderful pita and brisket hummus. Reminded me of some of the hummus options offered at Bavel in Los Angeles, but executed even better.

    We also had the salatim (popular for a reason), Carrot dish (excellent), the falafel dish (great, but I feel like there's a ceiling on how good a traditionally-made falafel could be--even if it's perfect), and the Steak (heavily spiced with paprika and very savory) and schmaltz potatoes dish.

    We'll be back soon to try the rest of the menu since I feel like we've only just hit the tip of the iceberg.
  • Post #30 - May 6th, 2019, 2:59 pm
    Post #30 - May 6th, 2019, 2:59 pm Post #30 - May 6th, 2019, 2:59 pm
    Behavioral wrote:I'll post photos later, but the S/O and I went last night and thoroughly enjoyed our meal and thought it was well-priced.

    The single brightest highlight was the wonderful pita and brisket hummus. Reminded me of some of the hummus options offered at Bavel in Los Angeles, but executed even better.

    We also had the salatim (popular for a reason), Carrot dish (excellent), the falafel dish (great, but I feel like there's a ceiling on how good a traditionally-made falafel could be--even if it's perfect), and the Steak (heavily spiced with paprika and very savory) and schmaltz potatoes dish.

    We'll be back soon to try the rest of the menu since I feel like we've only just hit the tip of the iceberg.


    The stuffed cabbage is a winner as is the fish. I went with my sons and their friends a few weeks ago and we ordered nearly the entire menu, and those were the favorites.

    Cocktails are inventive as well.

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