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  • Post #31 - October 6th, 2006, 10:23 am
    Post #31 - October 6th, 2006, 10:23 am Post #31 - October 6th, 2006, 10:23 am
    JoelM wrote:Poached eggs, cold. I asked the server about this and was told that they make their poached eggs ahead of time and refrigerate.

    Double Yuck!
  • Post #32 - October 6th, 2006, 10:36 am
    Post #32 - October 6th, 2006, 10:36 am Post #32 - October 6th, 2006, 10:36 am
    JoelM wrote:Poached eggs, cold. I asked the server about this and was told that they make their poached eggs ahead of time and refrigerate. I had never heard of this before.


    Lots of high volume restaurants make their poached eggs ahead and refrigerate...but they tend to reheat them for service. There is quite a bit of discussion about this technique in the Balthazzar Cookbook. I would hardly put Glens in the category of "high volume restaurant", though.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #33 - October 6th, 2006, 10:47 am
    Post #33 - October 6th, 2006, 10:47 am Post #33 - October 6th, 2006, 10:47 am
    d4v3 wrote:
    JoelM wrote:Poached eggs, cold. I asked the server about this and was told that they make their poached eggs ahead of time and refrigerate.

    Double Yuck!


    Exactly my reaction the first time I heard of this practice, but after a little experimentation, I did a complete 180. I'm extremely picky about poached eggs, and when I tried holding and reheating them at home, I was shocked by how good they were. I don't know that I could say there wasn't any discernable difference whatsoever, but if they'd been served to me in a restaurant I never would have guessed for a moment that they hadn't been freshly poached.

    That said, you have to actually reheat them :-)
    Dominic Armato
    Dining Critic
    The Arizona Republic and azcentral.com
  • Post #34 - October 6th, 2006, 11:12 am
    Post #34 - October 6th, 2006, 11:12 am Post #34 - October 6th, 2006, 11:12 am
    Dmnkly wrote:I don't know that I could say there wasn't any discernable difference whatsoever, but if they'd been served to me in a restaurant I never would have guessed for a moment that they hadn't been freshly poached.
    Interesting, it makes a lot of sense. I know that some grills won't do poached eggs during peak hours, because they require too much focus. I have probably been eating re-heated poached eggs all along without knowing it. How long will they keep?
  • Post #35 - October 6th, 2006, 1:19 pm
    Post #35 - October 6th, 2006, 1:19 pm Post #35 - October 6th, 2006, 1:19 pm
    Hi,

    What is the exact method? Do they poach them, then keep them in water in the refrigerator? Rewarming is done by placing them for a minute into simmering water?

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #36 - October 6th, 2006, 2:23 pm
    Post #36 - October 6th, 2006, 2:23 pm Post #36 - October 6th, 2006, 2:23 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:Hi,

    What is the exact method? Do they poach them, then keep them in water in the refrigerator? Rewarming is done by placing them for a minute into simmering water?

    Regards,


    Balthazar reheats theirs by putting "dozens of soft poached eggs" into a warm water bath that they keep next to the stove. The water is not hot enough to cook the eggs further, just hot enough to heat them through. When an order comes in, they slide a couple of eggs out of the water bath and on to an english muffin or brioche and cover with hollandaise.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #37 - October 6th, 2006, 3:20 pm
    Post #37 - October 6th, 2006, 3:20 pm Post #37 - October 6th, 2006, 3:20 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:What is the exact method? Do they poach them, then keep them in water in the refrigerator? Rewarming is done by placing them for a minute into simmering water?


    Not that there's much to it, but I followed the instructions of the CIA's New Professional Chef, wherein you shock them in ice water, refrigerate them, and later reheat them in water that's about 120-140 degrees. In looking back at the book, they instruct you to remove them from the water for refrigeration, but I believe I left them in the water. I did it for a brunch I was serving where I needed about 10 poached eggs as part of a dish that involved many other components that all had to be done last-minute. I poached them a couple of hours ahead of time, and they turned out beautifully. I'm one of those people who absolutely hates to do things ahead of time and let them sit, but I wouldn't hesitate to do it again.
    Dominic Armato
    Dining Critic
    The Arizona Republic and azcentral.com
  • Post #38 - October 9th, 2006, 11:58 am
    Post #38 - October 9th, 2006, 11:58 am Post #38 - October 9th, 2006, 11:58 am
    Though my boyfriend would like to make Glenn's our de-facto brunch location, I've found the service to be borderline obnoxious. Last time we were there it took them about 10 mins to ask us if we wanted coffee (and we were sitting at the bar right under their noses), they don't have real cream -- just "creamer", they forgot about bringing a check and we couldn't get anyone's attention, etc.

    Yesterday we went to Angel Food Bakery instead. Staff was very sweet (no pun intended).
  • Post #39 - October 11th, 2006, 10:49 am
    Post #39 - October 11th, 2006, 10:49 am Post #39 - October 11th, 2006, 10:49 am
    hmmm, have been to glenn's a few times now, and never had rude service, though they often seem (especially at brunch) slammed, which can lead to longer waits than some feel appropriate.
  • Post #40 - November 25th, 2006, 11:40 am
    Post #40 - November 25th, 2006, 11:40 am Post #40 - November 25th, 2006, 11:40 am
    This is the second place we have tried because we heard of it on LTH. Many thanks....

    I don't have pictures.

    We went last Saturday, fairly early for dinner. Were seated promptly.

    Service was excellent and friendly. Our server was Kat (Cat?). Unfortunately she is leaving in February.

    We didn't even know about the "Early Catch" specials, so they were a pleasant surprise.

    Ms. Corydalus had the Early Catch salmon. She loved it (I can't say since I don't care for salmon). With the sides offered it was a heap of food.

    I had the Alaskan halibut, pan fried with subtle seasonings. Not an Early Catch special, but I cannot say no to halibut. It may have been just a bit too seasoned, since halibut is so delicate and subtle, but that is of course person taste. Yum-O nonetheless ;-)

    One quibble; I asked for oil and vinegar with my salad and the vinegar was WHITE vinegar. I did inform Kat that white vinegar is suitable only for descaling coffee machines....

    Ambience is casual, which suits us fine. Prices were quite reasonable.

    We plan many return visits.
  • Post #41 - January 15th, 2007, 9:46 am
    Post #41 - January 15th, 2007, 9:46 am Post #41 - January 15th, 2007, 9:46 am
    I stopped at Glenn’s on Friday night for an early dinner. Since eating there early last summer I had been meaning to return and finally got to it on Friday to try the First Catch special. It really is a great value for the amount of food: soup, salad and entrée with sides. I had the New England clam chowder which was good – very thick (which I like) with lots of clams. The choices for First Catch entrees were the tilapia, the salmon and the mahi mahi. I went with the mahi mahi as that is the fish I make for myself the least. The fish was cooked perfectly. My only quibble was that the accompanying fruit salsa was heavier on the onion than on the fruit – something I chalked up to seasonality. I experienced good service and was happy to find the place pretty full (I was afraid they would be suffering do to the Montrose station closing).

    When I first dined at Glenn’s and saw the concept of fish specials on the chalkboard in addition to a regular menu, I assumed that the fish specials would be changing seasonally. I was surprised (and a little disappointed) to find on my return visit that most of the chalkboard fish specials were exactly the same as my first trip last summer. I’d like to see at least some variety in the sauces used and the accompanying vegetables for the fish entrees.
  • Post #42 - February 9th, 2007, 4:36 pm
    Post #42 - February 9th, 2007, 4:36 pm Post #42 - February 9th, 2007, 4:36 pm
    Sorry to bring up an oldish thread, but just wanted to make a note.
    The boyfriend and I tried Glenn's first for breakfast last summer and were not overly impressed. We went back a couple times for a nice, fresh fish dinner, and were fairly happy. It reminds me a great deal of the supper clubs I go to for dinner in northern Wisconsin. But the best reason to go to Glenn's is for the Tuesday night all-you-can-eat Alaskan king crab legs. It's a bit pricey at $30 per person, but the sides are also all-you-can-eat and the crab is mighty tasty. Glenn's is now our standard for crab cravings and we wouldn't dream of going anywhere else.
    I really don't think they're worth the trouble for breakfast, though. The food would have to be many times better to make up for the big crowd and slow service.
  • Post #43 - February 9th, 2007, 4:38 pm
    Post #43 - February 9th, 2007, 4:38 pm Post #43 - February 9th, 2007, 4:38 pm
    kezza wrote:Sorry to bring up an oldish thread, but just wanted to make a note.


    That's nothing to apologize for -- it happens 'round here all the time. In fact, I think it's one of the nice things about how the forum works...
    Joe G.

    "Whatever may be wrong with the world, at least it has some good things to eat." -- Cowboy Jack Clement
  • Post #44 - June 16th, 2007, 9:20 pm
    Post #44 - June 16th, 2007, 9:20 pm Post #44 - June 16th, 2007, 9:20 pm
    It had been awhile since I had been to Glenn's, but tonight it seemed like just the thing for a solo dinner: fresh Copper River salmon, crisp veggies, a little glass of wine and low-key atmosphere. Kinda pathetic, I know, but I feel really grateful for attentive service and a low noise level when I'm dining alone. I also need to feel like I'm not crashing someone's party. There are lots of small Thai places that meet these conditions. I've been spoiled by living so close to Spoon, but I can't go there every time I dine alone, and besides, Glenn's has pie. I will have to try the lunch or brunch sometime.
    Man : I can't understand how a poet like you can eat that stuff.
    T. S. Eliot: Ah, but you're not a poet.
  • Post #45 - June 16th, 2007, 11:33 pm
    Post #45 - June 16th, 2007, 11:33 pm Post #45 - June 16th, 2007, 11:33 pm
    I will have to try the lunch or brunch sometime.
    _________________


    Don't neglect breakfast either. Simple (like your dinner) but good (like your dinner).
    "The fork with two prongs is in use in northern Europe. In England, they’re armed with a steel trident, a fork with three prongs. In France we have a fork with four prongs; it’s the height of civilization." Eugene Briffault (1846)
  • Post #46 - June 17th, 2007, 3:30 pm
    Post #46 - June 17th, 2007, 3:30 pm Post #46 - June 17th, 2007, 3:30 pm
    Just wanted to add my two cents. A friend and I were arguing over where to go for dinner (he wanted sushi or eggs, I would have preferred Vietnamese or sushi) when we drove past Glenn's diner last weekend. Voila! Eggs and seafood...your choice. I had him do a u-turn and we went in.

    I enjoyed the atmosphere...it seems family-friendly, casually romantic, neighborhoody and great food to boot! We split the world's best shrimp cocktail (just got one, which was more than enough). I tried the Copper River salmon, and my friend had a____________ fish (can't for the life of me remember...the waiter described it as a fish that's not frequently available, but sometimes tuna fishers will catch a few for sale). Both were delicious...my friend's came with a garlic butter sauce, which he initially deemed to garlicy, but I noticed that he ate his entire fish and half of mine, too. (These are large fish portions...I'd estimate at least 8 oz.) For some reason, the entrees were slow in arriving (which was surprising, because there were only 6 or 7 tables occupied, including outside), so the waiter generously comped our drinks and a slice of maple pecan pie, which was also very tasty. We'll definitely be back.
  • Post #47 - June 17th, 2007, 10:09 pm
    Post #47 - June 17th, 2007, 10:09 pm Post #47 - June 17th, 2007, 10:09 pm
    chgoeditor wrote:J I tried the Copper River salmon, and my friend had a____________ fish (can't for the life of me remember...the waiter described it as a fish that's not frequently available, but sometimes tuna fishers will catch a few for sale).

    Was it Hawaiian mofongo or mochongo or something like that? They were recommending that last night, but I passed on it because they described it as tasting a bit like sea bass with a swordfish texture. I think I'd prefer the swordfish.
    Man : I can't understand how a poet like you can eat that stuff.
    T. S. Eliot: Ah, but you're not a poet.
  • Post #48 - June 17th, 2007, 11:19 pm
    Post #48 - June 17th, 2007, 11:19 pm Post #48 - June 17th, 2007, 11:19 pm
    Josephine wrote:Was it Hawaiian mofongo or mochongo or something like that? They were recommending that last night, but I passed on it because they described it as tasting a bit like sea bass with a swordfish texture. I think I'd prefer the swordfish.


    Yes, something like that. Though I think they also compared it to tuna, too.
  • Post #49 - June 18th, 2007, 10:13 am
    Post #49 - June 18th, 2007, 10:13 am Post #49 - June 18th, 2007, 10:13 am
    I think Glenn's Diner gets its pies from Hoosier Mama pie company. They were profiled in the reader weeks ago. A little $ ($18 for a chocolate cream pie) but oh so yummy. You can order them at: http://www.hoosiermamapie.com/
  • Post #50 - June 18th, 2007, 2:50 pm
    Post #50 - June 18th, 2007, 2:50 pm Post #50 - June 18th, 2007, 2:50 pm
    chgoeditor wrote:
    Josephine wrote:Was it Hawaiian mofongo or mochongo or something like that? They were recommending that last night, but I passed on it because they described it as tasting a bit like sea bass with a swordfish texture. I think I'd prefer the swordfish.


    Yes, something like that. Though I think they also compared it to tuna, too.

    Yup, they said something to me about tuna fishermen getting this fish occasionally.
    Man : I can't understand how a poet like you can eat that stuff.
    T. S. Eliot: Ah, but you're not a poet.
  • Post #51 - June 20th, 2007, 9:07 am
    Post #51 - June 20th, 2007, 9:07 am Post #51 - June 20th, 2007, 9:07 am
    Hit Glenn's the other night for dinner.

    Note that their 4p-6p $9.95 daily fish special is now $11.95 but runs from 11a-6p.

    I opted for the special. You get to chose from about 5 of the dozen or so daily fish specials and you get an 8 oz. portion.

    The special includes:
    1. Garden salad - nothing earthshattering but good quality.

    2. New England Claim Chowder (or you could have chosen one of the other two soups of the day)- served in a tall coffee mug and very tasty. More creamy than most NECCs I've tasted with very nocticeable bacon morsels throughout. A really good cup of chowder both in taste and size.

    3. I opted for the Fried Trout with Pecan Butter. WOW! Outstanding.
    I can't remember the last time I had trout but I've really been missing out. Perfectly fried trout, well-seasoned, very flavorful pecan butter in each bite. Nice side of red potatoes perfectly cooked and again seasoned appropriately. Also, a large corn on the cob. I can't express in words how wonderful a fresh corn on the cob tastes immersed in pecan butter with a lil' S&P. Outstanding. All three parts of the entree plate were very good to outstanding.

    Had a very nice carbernet from Paso Robles whose name escapes me.

    With tax and tip came to just over $24. What a wonderful meal. Won't be my last visit, wish it wasn't my first.

    NOTE: Glenn's is located almost direclty under the MONTROSE Brown Line stop. However, please note that this stop is currently closed for renovations so keep this in mind when considering transport options.

    Bster

    http://www.glennsdiner.com/
  • Post #52 - June 20th, 2007, 9:21 am
    Post #52 - June 20th, 2007, 9:21 am Post #52 - June 20th, 2007, 9:21 am
    HI,

    Was it trout filets or head-to-tail trout?

    Thanks for advising the daily special is also a lunch item.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #53 - June 20th, 2007, 9:59 am
    Post #53 - June 20th, 2007, 9:59 am Post #53 - June 20th, 2007, 9:59 am
    I ate at Glenn's a few weeks ago and have been meaning to post. Yellow Lake Perch was on the menu when I went. It was pretty tasty, although a bit overpriced for the ambience of Glenn's.

    Yellow Lake Perch Dinner @ Glenn's
    Image

    Our dinner, coupled with a visit to Margie's across the street made for a very nice mid-week date night for The Chow Poodle and me.

    Margie's Hot Fudge Sundae
    Image
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #54 - June 20th, 2007, 10:15 am
    Post #54 - June 20th, 2007, 10:15 am Post #54 - June 20th, 2007, 10:15 am
    HI,

    Prey tell, what was the price of the yellow perch?

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #55 - June 20th, 2007, 11:23 am
    Post #55 - June 20th, 2007, 11:23 am Post #55 - June 20th, 2007, 11:23 am
    Cathy2 wrote:HI,

    Prey tell, what was the price of the yellow perch?

    Regards,


    I don't remember exactly, but I remember being a little surprised when I got the bill. I think it was somewhere slightly above the $20 mark.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #56 - June 20th, 2007, 12:53 pm
    Post #56 - June 20th, 2007, 12:53 pm Post #56 - June 20th, 2007, 12:53 pm
    The Trout was skin-on head-to-tail style
  • Post #57 - June 21st, 2007, 7:21 am
    Post #57 - June 21st, 2007, 7:21 am Post #57 - June 21st, 2007, 7:21 am
    upthread is a note suggesting that Glenn's gets it's pies from hoosiermama's. If so, WOO HOO! I've been on an 8 year quest for decent apple pie in Chicago, and just last week discovered hoosiermama's - which can be had at a couple of coffee shops in the city. It was absolute perfection. Flaky, butter-tasting crust and crisp, not overly spiced apples. Perfect. Seriously.
  • Post #58 - August 18th, 2007, 11:08 pm
    Post #58 - August 18th, 2007, 11:08 pm Post #58 - August 18th, 2007, 11:08 pm
    Had heard various good things about Glenn's here and 2nd hand through various friends.
    Ended up wandering over because the 7-yr. old was too hungry for the 40 min. wait at Spacca.
    First impression was very positive: dark-cozy, as opposed to dark-gloomy. Buzzing and crowded but not claustrophobic. Greeted at the door immediately by a friendly person, and escorted to the bar to wait for a table to be set. Liked the general vibe: regulars being greeted familiarly, and the place managing to work both for dates and families with kids.

    When I saw the chalkboard menu on the wall, I gulped a bit seeing the dinner prices (nothing under $16.95), and fearing there was no other menu. However, the table was cleared for us within a minute. Waitress and menus followed directly, though the joint was jumping. A look at the regular menu and my wallet was back in diner-land, where it had hoped to be.
    Everything looked good. Wife ordered what she meant to be the crabcake appetizer, but turned out to be the dinner. No great loss, as they were excellent. Self had the shrimp po-boy with potato pancake side and another side of mixed veg (green beans, wax beans, baby carrots). The boy first thought choc. chip pancakes for dinner would be a bit of alright, but then decided to ask for spaghetti and meatballs (hold the meatballs).

    Our waitress was quick, competent, and very friendly.
    As mentioned, my wife very much enjoyed her crabcakes and the red pepper relish they came with. And the 3 cakes made up a very generous portion. I liked the shrimp po' boy a lot. The roll was soft rather than crusty, but that worked for me together with the "in-house" tartar sauce, crunch of raw onion and pretty generous shrimp.
    The Summer Wheat Leinie also went nicely with this sandwich.

    The boy dove into his spaghetti with marinara and pronounced it excellent. I am forced to disagree, and here's where the A/A- started to slip away: First the spaghetti was decidedly overdone. Second, the red sauce was completely undistinguished. Altogether smooth, no chunks or texture. A bit of dried herb flavor (at least to my tongue). Third when the bill came, they charged the full $11.95. They have a right, I suppose, but for my money, when a 7-yr. old orders noodles and sauce without the meatballs, you don't charge the full $11.95. That goes double when the noodles are over-cooked and the sauce is mediocre. I can't really see why this item would be on as carefully wrought a menu as Glenn's has.

    The 2nd demerit was the "Glenn's potato pancake" that came with my po' boy. I don't know what was going on there. First, it was neither deep fried, nor even pan fried like a latke. It appeared to have been unsuccssfully cooked on the grill with no oil at all. The outside had some blackening in the center of both sides, the rest was fish-belly white. Not a bit of it bore any trace of browning from hot oil, nor any crispyness. I mean, what the hell else is a potato pancake for if not oil and crispyness?

    It was formed from a very coarse shred of potatos, like hash browns, (as opposed to fine-grated like a latke, or at least my family's latkes) but it was bound by some odd creamy substance (egg/cream/flour? Dunno.) Whatever it was, it didn't cook or set in it's brief time on the grill, it just existed there, wetly occupying the interstices between the not-fully-cooked potato shreds. It was as if this was meant to be a french sort of baked potato casserole dish that someone tried to do on a griddle by mistake. And boy, was it a mistake. I don't believe I have ever in my life failed to finish a potato item of any kind before now. But there was just nothing going on there. I felt like Tom Colicchio looking at some wayward contestant and asking, "What were you thinking?"

    I definitely want to try breakfast, and want to give the chalkboard items a try. It looks like that's where they are really putting their attention. I liked the descriptions, and I liked the look of the plates that went by. But it does give one pause to encounter a kitchen with definite aspirations that falls down on boiling spaghetti and frying potatoes.
    "Strange how potent cheap music is."
  • Post #59 - August 20th, 2007, 8:07 am
    Post #59 - August 20th, 2007, 8:07 am Post #59 - August 20th, 2007, 8:07 am
    It was formed from a very coarse shred of potatos, like hash browns, (as opposed to fine-grated like a latke, or at least my family's latkes) but it was bound by some odd creamy substance (egg/cream/flour? Dunno.)


    This is their version of the thing (definitely not a latke), and when it's cooked through it works pretty well with breakfast eggs (my wife who usually finds a pile of hash-browns to be far too starchy for morning finished hers). In any case, I found it to be an interesting variation on a theme. It should probably work with sauteed/broiled fish dishes, too, altho I don't think its pairing with a shrimp po' boy is a marriage made in heaven.
    "The fork with two prongs is in use in northern Europe. In England, they’re armed with a steel trident, a fork with three prongs. In France we have a fork with four prongs; it’s the height of civilization." Eugene Briffault (1846)
  • Post #60 - August 20th, 2007, 6:12 pm
    Post #60 - August 20th, 2007, 6:12 pm Post #60 - August 20th, 2007, 6:12 pm
    [/quote]I don't think its pairing with a shrimp po' boy is a marriage made in heaven.
    I wasn't in it for the marriage of taste and texture, I was in it for crispy potato goodness. I just don't see how this thing could ever work period, let alone in a healthy marriage, being done, apparently, on the griddle with no oil. It seems doomed to be partly burned, partly raw. But, c'est la vie. I'll probably be back to try some more.
    "Strange how potent cheap music is."

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