LTH Home

Eleven City Diner - Open

Eleven City Diner - Open
  • Forum HomePost Reply BackTop
    Page 2 of 3
  • Post #31 - April 6th, 2006, 4:33 pm
    Post #31 - April 6th, 2006, 4:33 pm Post #31 - April 6th, 2006, 4:33 pm
    Steve,

    Little did you know, VI and I were dining at the "kitchen table" when you were at Eleven City. (We were at a booth at the back, near the kitchen.)

    I'm not going to pile on. Here are some positives. I really like the design of the place, and I was pleased to see that this corner of the city has almost completed its transformation over the past few years into a living, even buzzing neighborhood. I think that 11 City might become the anchor, quickly. The mix of condo dwellers, small business owners, screaming drunks (ask VI), and mainly, lots and lots of students have turned something of a dead zone into a vital place. Makes da Mayor look like he has vision, kind of.

    The main guy, who is trying a little too hard to be the "Brash Jewish Deli Owner" with a hipster twist means well -- that's obvious. He really seems to care what you think, and wants things to be right, even though he clearly disagrees with you. The guy's having fun, which is more than most of us can say about our job.

    The help has serious problems. There are plenty of appropriately skilled waitpersons at various establishments with "Golden" in the name around town who would jump at the chance to make the tips that might come from 11 City. They should reach out to these career servers.

    I agree with Steve and others about most of the deli food. Not sure it's going to get there, and what with the business already and the foot traffic, I'm not sure that anyone is going to be in a big hurry to raise the bar. I do have to disagree with the early comment that the meat is 87% as good as Langer's. Hardly, at least today. Not that my pastrami was bad. Pretty good, really. Think of it this way, sports and movie buffs: Jake LaMotta was maybe 87% as good as Ray Robinson. The 11 City Diner sandwich is ranked, an up-and-comer, an early undercard, but not a contender, and no, not a near-even match with the champ. Chopped liver was pretty good. My benchmark in Chicago is still Gibson's.

    But the patty melt does look nice, and I was interested in the sliders. So the neighborhood is lousy with burger options -- Hackney's, Blackie's, that new Green Bay place, and now the unlikely Jewish Diner.

    Oh, they have some nice looking smoked fish in the front case, that you can't buy yet.

    I'm rooting for the place. Looks like a good late-night stop for a patty melt.
    Last edited by JeffB on April 7th, 2006, 10:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #32 - April 6th, 2006, 6:49 pm
    Post #32 - April 6th, 2006, 6:49 pm Post #32 - April 6th, 2006, 6:49 pm
    thanks to all for their great post. I am a long time lurker. It makes me kinda sad to read these post. I long for a katz's pastrami with a potato knish. I had such high hopes for this deli but alas, really good deli in chicago is still elusive. :(
  • Post #33 - April 7th, 2006, 10:50 am
    Post #33 - April 7th, 2006, 10:50 am Post #33 - April 7th, 2006, 10:50 am
    I ate at the bar just west of Steve Z and Chinola (recognised Steve from several pictures of him on the forum and the fact he was taking pictures of his corned beef) and concur in most aspects.

    Some additional thoughts:

    1. Manager also offered up the bar after telling us it would be a ten minute wait even though there were two tables open.
    2. Matso ball(sp) soup was ok, texture of the ball a little too mushy, broth a little bland. Hostess asked how everythig was which prompted me to say that the broth was a little bland. Her response " Are you Jewish? Jews like it that way, you can use the salt and pepper."
    3. Pastami was good IMHO as it can be to rich at other places. At Mannys, I get corned beef and pastrami together to cut the richness.
    4. The bartender/waiter stated our discouse by asking if we wanted the calimari to start, I thought we might be at Maggianos.
    5. We did order the Mountain, pile of fried onion strips for six bucks, which was excellent, crispy and not greasy at all. Too much and too expensive, but still good.

    Overall, not a bad place for the hood, but not worth a big drive and a little pricey. Its no Mannys.

    Babaluch
  • Post #34 - April 7th, 2006, 12:13 pm
    Post #34 - April 7th, 2006, 12:13 pm Post #34 - April 7th, 2006, 12:13 pm
    babaluch wrote:2. Matso ball(sp) soup was ok, texture of the ball a little too mushy, broth a little bland. Hostess asked how everythig was which prompted me to say that the broth was a little bland. Her response " Are you Jewish? Jews like it that way, you can use the salt and pepper."
    5. We did order the Mountain, pile of fried onion strips for six bucks, which was excellent, crispy and not greasy at all. Too much and too expensive, but still good.


    #2 is spectacular. Wow. Just, wow.

    Good to hear the onion strips are tasty. $6 is a little steep, but about the same as a fried onion loaf at a lot of bars, and the quantity is similar. Split between four college kids, it's probably a good deal.
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #35 - April 7th, 2006, 1:52 pm
    Post #35 - April 7th, 2006, 1:52 pm Post #35 - April 7th, 2006, 1:52 pm
    babaluch wrote:
    2. Matso ball(sp) soup was ok, texture of the ball a little too mushy, broth a little bland. Hostess asked how everythig was which prompted me to say that the broth was a little bland. Her response " Are you Jewish? Jews like it that way, you can use the salt and pepper."

    LMAO . . . the mystery of my grandmother's horrible chicken soup has now been explained. :lol:

    =R=
    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain

    Another beer before happy hour to put me in the mood for drinkin', uh huh huh, oh, forget thinkin' --Beaver Nelson

    I find it a matter of note that in New York or Terre Haute, school cookies always seem to be oatmeal --Mr. French
  • Post #36 - April 9th, 2006, 3:45 pm
    Post #36 - April 9th, 2006, 3:45 pm Post #36 - April 9th, 2006, 3:45 pm
    I tried to have breakfast at 11 City this morning. My party (of two, it's not like I was with a huge group of people) was initially told it would be a 30 minute wait, but after waiting over an hour the hostesses (two of them for some unknown reason) told us they still wouldn't be able to seat us for another 25 to 30 minutes. While they definitely seemed to have attracted quite a lot of patrons, it was pretty obvious that this place is seriously understaffed and just plain unprepared to deal with a full house. Oh, and the hostesses were only vaguely apologetic about the confusion over how long the wait would truly be.

    Anyway, after the debacle at 11 City my friend and I headed to Gioco's and enjoyed a wonderful brunch. The food was perfect as always and the service was attentive and pleasant. I would definitely suggest Gioco as a nice low key alternative to the mayhem at 11 City or even the Bongo Room for Sunday brunch.

    I don't know if I'll try my luck again at 11 City any time soon. I live in the neighborhood, so I guess never say never. It's too bad though, because this place definitely had the potential to be a great neighborhood joint.
  • Post #37 - April 10th, 2006, 6:05 pm
    Post #37 - April 10th, 2006, 6:05 pm Post #37 - April 10th, 2006, 6:05 pm
    SMT wrote:I tried to have breakfast at 11 City this morning. My party (of two, it's not like I was with a huge group of people) was initially told it would be a 30 minute wait, but after waiting over an hour the hostesses (two of them for some unknown reason) told us they still wouldn't be able to seat us for another 25 to 30 minutes. While they definitely seemed to have attracted quite a lot of patrons, it was pretty obvious that this place is seriously understaffed and just plain unprepared to deal with a full house. Oh, and the hostesses were only vaguely apologetic about the confusion over how long the wait would truly be.

    Anyway, after the debacle at 11 City my friend and I headed to Gioco's and enjoyed a wonderful brunch. The food was perfect as always and the service was attentive and pleasant. I would definitely suggest Gioco as a nice low key alternative to the mayhem at 11 City or even the Bongo Room for Sunday brunch.

    I don't know if I'll try my luck again at 11 City any time soon. I live in the neighborhood, so I guess never say never. It's too bad though, because this place definitely had the potential to be a great neighborhood joint.

    Gioco has brunch? :idea:
  • Post #38 - April 10th, 2006, 8:38 pm
    Post #38 - April 10th, 2006, 8:38 pm Post #38 - April 10th, 2006, 8:38 pm
    Yes, Gioco started serving Sunday brunch last fall some time if I recall correctly. The menu is actually available on their website (http://www.gioco-chicago.com/menu.htm). So far I've tried the fritattas and the brioche french toast and enjoyed them all. The scones are also always very good.

    Oh, and I forgot to mention in my earlier post that when I was told by the 11 City hostess that it would still take another 30 minutes or so to seat us they actually had about 3 or 4 tables open but apparently not enough help to wait on and cook the food necessary for those tables. :shock:

    Sounded pretty ridiculous to me, but what do I know...
  • Post #39 - April 15th, 2006, 10:55 am
    Post #39 - April 15th, 2006, 10:55 am Post #39 - April 15th, 2006, 10:55 am
    Well, I have to say, I was more than pleasantly surprised after having dinner here last night. My friends had suggested we go to a diner behind their condo and I was thinking it would be a greasy dive, but nooooo. We had some great food. I had an outstanding open faced turkey sanwich (the bread was so delicious). My friends had patty melts and mac 'n' cheese. They were both awesome. I can't wait to go back and try their shakes and breakfast items. The only thing I didn't like was the owner Brad. I had worked with him before at another restaurant and disliked him immensely and did not know that he had opened up the 11. I would like to say I wouldn't go back striclty because of this guy, but the food was too good. Guess I'll have to suck it up. :shock:

    Eleven City Diner
    1112 S. Wabash
    Chicago, IL
  • Post #40 - April 15th, 2006, 12:46 pm
    Post #40 - April 15th, 2006, 12:46 pm Post #40 - April 15th, 2006, 12:46 pm
    driscoll75 wrote:I can't wait to go back and try their shakes and breakfast items.


    let us know how the shake turns out. When I tried it the Sunday after they first opened (thus I'm giving it the benefit of the doubt), it was watery and unimpressive, and size/portion was small. White Palace's version is undoubtbly better than the one I had at 11.
  • Post #41 - April 18th, 2006, 5:55 pm
    Post #41 - April 18th, 2006, 5:55 pm Post #41 - April 18th, 2006, 5:55 pm
    I had lunch here yesterday. At the height of the lunch hour, my party of three had no wait. With my downtown office pretty much equidistant from Eleven City Diner and Manny's, I can't think of a single reason I'd return to ECD. With three of us, I was able to sample both the corned beef and pastrami. Definitely OK, and I suppose if I lived in that hood, I'd try it again. Definitely not up to Manny's, especially in terms of a lack of intensity of the cured meat flavors that make corned beef and pastrami the delicious meats they are.

    Service was horrible. I ordered the Reuben, asking for the bread to be cooked "really" crisp. It was so limp (very good rye bread, mind you), that it really couldn't hold the generous ingredients in between without falling apart. We ordered the side of pickles, asking for the "newest" pickles available. The pickles we received were beyond overdone, so we sent them back and asked to just cancel the order. Brian Rubin did come over a few minutes later with a plate of very new, delicious pickles, confirming what others have written on this thread, that a lot of their problems are due to a totally inexperienced wait staff. I had ordered a chocolate egg cream at the same time we ordered lunch, and it hadn't arrived by the time I was half-way through the whole meal. Brian walked by about that time, and I mentioned it to him. He got right on it (and said there'd be no charge for it), and several minutes later our young waitress delivered a room temperature, not very chocolaty concoction. She apologized for the wait, but said she'd been looking for someone to show her how to make it. On top of all that, it appeared on the bill anyway.

    I'm old enough to remember Ashkenaz on Morse, and Rascal House in North Miami Beach as it was in the 70's and 80's, and they remain (at least in my memory) as the gold standard for Jewish delis. This place may make it just because there's such a dearth in Chicago of places even pretending to be real Jewish delis. Why Rich Melman never gave it a shot, I don't know. For now, I'll settle for Manny's and The Bagel. It'll be interesting to see if ECD improves enough to stay in business. If I read that it has gotten its act together, I'm sure I'll try it again.
  • Post #42 - May 22nd, 2006, 3:41 pm
    Post #42 - May 22nd, 2006, 3:41 pm Post #42 - May 22nd, 2006, 3:41 pm
    Let this serve as a warning: Stay away from the so-called "World's Greatest Macaroni and Cheese." A curious title for what seems to be Kraft Easy Mac sparsely topped with Wheaties. When I asked what sort of cheese they used ("What is this, Velveeta?") the manager assured me that it was not Velveeta brand, but a mixture of things that included a similarly reconstituted cheese. Whew! I guess this dish would be great if you were a five-year-old visiting from Orono, Minnesota.
  • Post #43 - May 22nd, 2006, 4:02 pm
    Post #43 - May 22nd, 2006, 4:02 pm Post #43 - May 22nd, 2006, 4:02 pm
    I had lunch at ECD last week with another LTH'er and I find it very telling that neither one of us has posted about our experience . . . until now.

    It wasn't that it was awful but it wasn't exceptional in any way. We agreed that the chopped liver was decent and I liked the rye bread.

    But, my companion couldn't even try the kreplach soup -- his favorite gauge of a Jewish deli -- because kreplachs weren't available. The pastrami tasted to me like very salty, standard-issue Vienna beef product with no perceivable smoke and almost no aromatic notes at all. The chicken soup was bland, the matzoh ball a bit too soft for my liking and the fall-apart latke, while somewhat tasty, resembled a croquette more than anything else. My companion speculated that it may have been made from mashed potatoes.

    When we left at about 1 pm, there was a short line of folks waiting for open tables.

    =R=
    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain

    Another beer before happy hour to put me in the mood for drinkin', uh huh huh, oh, forget thinkin' --Beaver Nelson

    I find it a matter of note that in New York or Terre Haute, school cookies always seem to be oatmeal --Mr. French
  • Post #44 - May 22nd, 2006, 7:35 pm
    Post #44 - May 22nd, 2006, 7:35 pm Post #44 - May 22nd, 2006, 7:35 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:I had lunch at ECD last week with another LTH'er and I find it very telling that neither one of us has posted about our experience . . . until now.


    I'll out myself as ronnie's dining companion. I think we both agreed that ECD met, and did not exceed, our low expectations.

    I was holding off on posting too much because I'm willing to return to give their smoked fish a try, but nothing at lunch really impressed me. Decent bread and chopped liver, the cabbage soup was ok, and the pastrami was plain ol' pastrami--not bad, just not anything that should ever be mentioned in the same breath as other, more established pastrami palaces.

    I won't be back for lunch anytime soon, but I'm planning a return brunch trip for some fish. My uncle happened to eat there the same day we did and he allegedly had a very nice piece of sable. ;)

    Best,
    Michael
  • Post #45 - May 23rd, 2006, 9:29 am
    Post #45 - May 23rd, 2006, 9:29 am Post #45 - May 23rd, 2006, 9:29 am
    Is anyone else amazed that a place could squander so much hype and general goodwill with mistakes that you rarely see restaurants make? It's almost like they're making a special effort to alienate people; it's not like it's hard to get the makings of a decent (if not outstanding) corned beef or pastrami sandwich in this city. Why offer macaroni and cheese at all (let alone at downtown prices) if you don't care enough to attempt to make something from scratch? And while often well meaning, how is it that the entire waitstaff at a single restaurant can act like novices?
  • Post #46 - May 23rd, 2006, 9:41 am
    Post #46 - May 23rd, 2006, 9:41 am Post #46 - May 23rd, 2006, 9:41 am
    ndgbucktown wrote:And while often well meaning, how is it that the entire waitstaff at a single restaurant can act like novices?

    This reminds me of one other thing I forgot to mention about our lunch . . . waitress deposited another customer's change on our table without even stopping to think about it. I'm not sure she ever would have noticed but Michael eventually handed it back to her, and even then she seemed to be in full disbelief that she'd left it on the wrong table. That said, she was plenty nice and not rude in any way.

    =R=
    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain

    Another beer before happy hour to put me in the mood for drinkin', uh huh huh, oh, forget thinkin' --Beaver Nelson

    I find it a matter of note that in New York or Terre Haute, school cookies always seem to be oatmeal --Mr. French
  • Post #47 - December 28th, 2007, 1:37 pm
    Post #47 - December 28th, 2007, 1:37 pm Post #47 - December 28th, 2007, 1:37 pm
    Well, I finally made it back to ECD for lunch. Over a year ago I swore that I'd have the patty melt on my next visit:

    stevez wrote:The sandwich arrived perfectly cooked at medium rare as ordered and was one of the best patty melts I have ever had. Aside from wanting to try out their lox platter, I’ll never order anything else besides a patty melt (or perhaps a tuna melt) at Eleven City Diner. That is the winning dish AFAIC.


    I approached the sandwich with guarded optimism. Nothing at ECD, beyond the decor, has really impressed me in the past.

    I'm pleased to say that I completely agree with stevez. This is among the best patty melts available anywhere. Cooked perfectly medium-rare, with a well-balanced aplication of cheese, onion, and 1000 island dressing, griddled crisp on flavorful rye bread. No one ingredient overpowered the sandwich and the texture contrast between the meat and bread was great.

    It was a dripping hot symphony on rye. I'd go back for it in a second.

    If only they had better fries and pickles.

    Best,
    Michael
  • Post #48 - January 27th, 2009, 6:50 pm
    Post #48 - January 27th, 2009, 6:50 pm Post #48 - January 27th, 2009, 6:50 pm
    stevez wrote:It’s not all gloom and doom, though. ChiNOLA had the great foresight to order a patty melt. When he ordered, the server asked him how he wanted it cooked. That’s right. You actually get your choice of temperature on a patty melt.

    Med-rare patty melt was as good, if not better, than advertised. In particular a solid rye flavor coming coming through the fresh tasting rye bread. Thanks ChiNola/Steve Z.

    Eleven City Patty Melt

    Image

    I had the pleasure of Michael Morowitz's company at lunch, and we split Patty Melt and Lox for one. Michael noted the lox was very fresh, I agree, but though it a shade neutral flavored and a bit light on lox for the price.

    Lox Plate for One

    Image

    All in all my best outing to date at Eleven City, good service, excellent company and a killer Patty Melt.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Sauce on the side, always, implied, axiomatic..........never a doubt, BBQ sauce without.

    Low & Slow
  • Post #49 - January 27th, 2009, 7:31 pm
    Post #49 - January 27th, 2009, 7:31 pm Post #49 - January 27th, 2009, 7:31 pm
    GWiv -- I haven't been to ECD in awhile but that patty melt is one of my favorite things in this town. It's always done perfectly meat temperature wise (for me, perfect medium rare, more on the rare side). The thousand island dressing is really good and it all melts together in a really nice way. Thanks for posting that excellent picture of it. I want one -- like right now.

    I also dig the open faced turkey sandwich -- ECD has some really good chicken/turkey gravy and when you have that open faced sandwich on their terrific challah -- it's a winner of a lunch.

    I do, however, recommend getting their breakfast potatoes over their fries. Their fries are just sort of ho hum. The breakfast potatoes, really home fries with seasoning, are usually very tasty.

    I've always enjoyed Eleven City Diner -- I look forward to my next meal there.

    Shannon
  • Post #50 - January 27th, 2009, 9:13 pm
    Post #50 - January 27th, 2009, 9:13 pm Post #50 - January 27th, 2009, 9:13 pm
    G Wiv wrote:All in all my best outing to date at Eleven City, good service, excellent company and a killer Patty Melt.


    Next time do yourself a favor and try the chopped liver. Almost as good a beef liver rendition as you will find at the Romanian.
  • Post #51 - January 27th, 2009, 11:07 pm
    Post #51 - January 27th, 2009, 11:07 pm Post #51 - January 27th, 2009, 11:07 pm
    I do, however, recommend getting their breakfast potatoes over their fries.


    pass'em both up and get the potato pancake instead. one of the best i've had.
    http://edzos.com/
    Edzo's Evanston on Facebook or Twitter.

    Edzo's Lincoln Park on Facebook or Twitter.
  • Post #52 - January 28th, 2009, 8:33 am
    Post #52 - January 28th, 2009, 8:33 am Post #52 - January 28th, 2009, 8:33 am
    elakin wrote:
    I do, however, recommend getting their breakfast potatoes over their fries.


    pass'em both up and get the potato pancake instead. one of the best i've had.


    OMG. We couldn't dissagree more about the potato pancake. I thought the mashed potato consistancy was aweful and a disgrace to potatoes everywhere.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #53 - January 28th, 2009, 9:33 am
    Post #53 - January 28th, 2009, 9:33 am Post #53 - January 28th, 2009, 9:33 am
    stevez wrote:
    elakin wrote:
    I do, however, recommend getting their breakfast potatoes over their fries.


    pass'em both up and get the potato pancake instead. one of the best i've had.


    OMG. We couldn't dissagree more about the potato pancake. I thought the mashed potato consistancy was aweful and a disgrace to potatoes everywhere.


    Definitely a question of style. I hate the ECD pancake, in fact I'd just refer to it as a croquette. If you really enjoy that style, I can see how you'd love it.
  • Post #54 - January 28th, 2009, 9:38 am
    Post #54 - January 28th, 2009, 9:38 am Post #54 - January 28th, 2009, 9:38 am
    iblock9 wrote:
    G Wiv wrote:All in all my best outing to date at Eleven City, good service, excellent company and a killer Patty Melt.


    Next time do yourself a favor and try the chopped liver. Almost as good a beef liver rendition as you will find at the Romanian.


    I was with Gary at lunch and I agree with him on all counts. The patty melt is a fantastic sandwich full of distinct flavors and juicy without being too messy. The lox plate is fresh, but a shrug overall, especially for the cost.

    Gary asked me if we should order the chopped liver, which I've had. It's decent chopped liver, but for $8 or $9 (I think), it's still not as good as what you get at Myron & Phil's for free. I really think ECD is just plain over-priced.

    Best,
    Michael
  • Post #55 - January 28th, 2009, 11:17 am
    Post #55 - January 28th, 2009, 11:17 am Post #55 - January 28th, 2009, 11:17 am
    I hear you folks on the Potato Latke. Here is a little history. And please understand I am NOT passing the buck. Firstly, it is NOT the latke I grew up with. My moms and Bubbies are much different. When we opened, MK (Michael Kornick) had been kind enough to design and execute a few dishes for us. This Latke was one of them.
    There are huge fans, and there are huge haters of the 11 city Latke. Please note that I will romanticaly defend our little (big) latke as I like it. It is a tough call.
    This much I can tell you, all this recent chatter about my latke, has been motivation for our Chef Francisco (who has really come into his own here; formerly out of MK's kitchen after a few years) to relook at it. If we do come upon something different, I will most definitely post here and I look forward to hearing your feedback (LTHers). Again, thanks for your enthusiasm about our little diner.......brad
  • Post #56 - January 28th, 2009, 11:25 am
    Post #56 - January 28th, 2009, 11:25 am Post #56 - January 28th, 2009, 11:25 am
    eatchicago wrote:it's still not as good as what you get at Myron & Phil's for free. I really think ECD is just plain over-priced.


    M & P's liver is chicken liver, and a very good rendition at that. I happen to prefer beef liver (The liver at the Romanian is my very favorite in town) and I think the ECD version is great. I have a hard time not ordering the chopped liver on any menu, but these are tough economic times and I can understand the cost-consciuousness. :D
  • Post #57 - January 28th, 2009, 12:14 pm
    Post #57 - January 28th, 2009, 12:14 pm Post #57 - January 28th, 2009, 12:14 pm
    Definitely a question of style. I hate the ECD pancake, in fact I'd just refer to it as a croquette. If you really enjoy that style, I can see how you'd love it.


    i'd actually agree with that. i'm not super concerned about authenticity, i just like the thing and think it's really tasty. but i concede the point that it's not at all a traditional latke.
    http://edzos.com/
    Edzo's Evanston on Facebook or Twitter.

    Edzo's Lincoln Park on Facebook or Twitter.
  • Post #58 - January 28th, 2009, 1:03 pm
    Post #58 - January 28th, 2009, 1:03 pm Post #58 - January 28th, 2009, 1:03 pm
    iblock9 wrote:but these are tough economic times and I can understand the cost-consciuousness. :D


    I can afford it, and I won't be ordering it again.
  • Post #59 - January 28th, 2009, 1:14 pm
    Post #59 - January 28th, 2009, 1:14 pm Post #59 - January 28th, 2009, 1:14 pm
    i agree that the prices are on the high side at 11CD. i really like the place, but we do consider it somewhat of a splurge and wouldn't go there on any sort of regular basis. but, then again, we don't live nearby, so probably wouldn't be regulars even if the prices were low.
    http://edzos.com/
    Edzo's Evanston on Facebook or Twitter.

    Edzo's Lincoln Park on Facebook or Twitter.
  • Post #60 - January 30th, 2009, 11:51 am
    Post #60 - January 30th, 2009, 11:51 am Post #60 - January 30th, 2009, 11:51 am
    i do think the prices are a bit high but was ok with them until they charged me $1.25 for horseradish! i am a huge fan of manny's but it was a sunday so i thought 11 city would fill the fix. all i wanted was a turkey pastrami with horseradish and was shocked by the surcharge for a puny scoop of horseradish! i will say that the waiter warned me about the additional charge, but still i think this is a bit outrageous!

    also, i am not a fan of latkes, but again this is all personal preference and is often dependent upon what/if you grew up with a certain type.

    they do make a lovely ice cream sundae!

Contact

About

Team

Advertize

Close

Chat

Articles

Guide

Events

more