LTH Home

Is there bad pizza in the Chicago area?

Is there bad pizza in the Chicago area?
  • Forum HomePost Reply BackTop
    Page 4 of 4 
  • Post #91 - May 14th, 2019, 11:38 am
    Post #91 - May 14th, 2019, 11:38 am Post #91 - May 14th, 2019, 11:38 am
    WhyBeeSea wrote:So I'll tell you my strong opinions on what I'm eating, but I'll still eat it all even if it's terrible.

    That's how I feel about bad pizza, whether it's a chain or family run business.

    I might try something once, but if it’s bad, never again.
    "Very good... but not my favorite." ~ Johnny Depp as Roux the Gypsy in Chocolat
  • Post #92 - May 23rd, 2019, 1:36 pm
    Post #92 - May 23rd, 2019, 1:36 pm Post #92 - May 23rd, 2019, 1:36 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    Rene G wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:You left out my LOL emoji when you quoted me.

    I think thetrob tried to quote you correctly. Here's the code:

    Code: Select all
    [quote="ronnie_suburban"][quote="thetrob"][quote="ronnie_suburban"]
    ...
    Imo, they're pretty bad.  Having to feed a bunch of children is not a meaningful measure of quality.  Otherwise, I'd still eat at Old Country Buffet once a week.  In any event, starting kids on bad pizza is a gateway mistake that can only lead to bad taste and bad palates down the road. :lol:

    =R=[/quote]

    My kids ate enough Dominos as kids and their palates survived with no problem.  They won't touch the stuff now.[/quote]
    Yes, understood.  You left out my LOL emoji when you quoted me.

    =R=[/quote]

    Just yesterday, in another thread, I tried to post a response that included a quote with an essential emoji. Everything appeared properly except the emoji was missing. I tried troubleshooting, but eventually just gave up and didn't post. I didn't want to "misquote" the person.

    Thanks, Peter, for the heads up. Flame wars have erupted over less, especially on threads about pizza! :D

    =R=

    Is there any solution? This is a general, persistent problem. Whenever I try to quote a post containing an emoji, the emoji fails to appear even though the proper code is present. If I delete the quote code tags (with no other changes), the emoji is displayed as it should be. I assume everyone has this problem. Often it's of little consequence, but sometimes it results in a "misquotation," as you noticed earlier.
  • Post #93 - May 23rd, 2019, 1:45 pm
    Post #93 - May 23rd, 2019, 1:45 pm Post #93 - May 23rd, 2019, 1:45 pm
    Rene G wrote:Is there any solution?

    Just use the old txt emoticons.

    :O
    "Very good... but not my favorite." ~ Johnny Depp as Roux the Gypsy in Chocolat
  • Post #94 - May 23rd, 2019, 2:55 pm
    Post #94 - May 23rd, 2019, 2:55 pm Post #94 - May 23rd, 2019, 2:55 pm
    Rene G wrote:Is there any solution? This is a general, persistent problem. Whenever I try to quote a post containing an emoji, the emoji fails to appear even though the proper code is present. If I delete the quote code tags (with no other changes), the emoji is displayed as it should be. I assume everyone has this problem. Often it's of little consequence, but sometimes it results in a "misquotation," as you noticed earlier.

    This is now part of the "package" of issues we'll be addressing (with some outside help). Unfortunately, I can't provide a timeline.

    Thanks,

    =R=
    for LTH
    Gardening is a bloodsport --Meghan Kleeman

    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #95 - May 24th, 2019, 6:57 am
    Post #95 - May 24th, 2019, 6:57 am Post #95 - May 24th, 2019, 6:57 am
    The jumbo slices from any of the Bacci Pizzeria locations are usually disappointing. Taking a slice home and baking it to firm up the crust usually helps.
  • Post #96 - May 24th, 2019, 9:15 am
    Post #96 - May 24th, 2019, 9:15 am Post #96 - May 24th, 2019, 9:15 am
    chainey wrote:The jumbo slices from any of the Bacci Pizzeria locations are usually disappointing. Taking a slice home and baking it to firm up the crust usually helps.


    Even though I found their pizza completely mediocre the first visit, I returned a second time. Never again. I'm not sure the crispness was the problem. For me, the unforgettable parts added up to a final product lacking almost any flavor. Not to mention, I felt the slices were expensive for what it was. Maybe, if it was great pizza.

    Both visits were at lunchtime and I was the only person there. All of the pizzas looked tired. This was the the Ukrainian Village location. YMMV.
  • Post #97 - May 24th, 2019, 11:08 am
    Post #97 - May 24th, 2019, 11:08 am Post #97 - May 24th, 2019, 11:08 am
    Bacci is an abomination. Sort of the opposite of the Woody Allen bit ("the food is awful ... and such small portions"). A generous serving size does not compensate for a truly poor product. This is a business that should only be open from 10:00PM to 4:00AM. Let them sell frozen yogurt the rest of the time.
  • Post #98 - May 30th, 2019, 5:56 pm
    Post #98 - May 30th, 2019, 5:56 pm Post #98 - May 30th, 2019, 5:56 pm
    Katie wrote:
    Panther in the Den wrote:
    thetrob wrote:As I write this I find it hard to believe that I am defending Pizza Hut, Dominoes and the likes, but for people I know that travel extensively to small towns and out of the way places, they relish a chain pizza joint nearby to get something they at least know will be edible.

    I find it hard to believe too and hence my post.

    I also not going to buy the small town thing either. I travel a fair amount and will always seek out a local, privately owned place, a diner, anything.

    Okay, I fully understand that most of the population is scared of small places and will h ad to a chain, McDonald’s, Taco Bell because they know what to expect and won’t get sick.

    But not here on the forum. That is just being lazy and giving up. :)

    Maybe some of us here are afraid of small town diners too?


    I think that's a bit too judgmental. There are thousands and thousands of small towns and rural areas in the US that would love to have a pizza or Chinese or barbecue or fried chicken place, but there often is just not enough population nearby to keep such a place in business.

    Case in point: my mom came from a small town downstate, 13 miles away from the nearest interstate, population about 3,000. The town has occasionally and gratefully hosted a pizza place or a Chinese restaurant or something similar, but has much more often than not only been able to pine for such a place. It is a typical small town in farm country with a long-dying Main Street, a small IGA, a gas station, exactly one restaurant in town (currently a Subway), and a Casey's gas station (which has decent things to eat when you need them). I'm certainly not "afraid" of mom's home town; I'm down there a couple of times a year. But, much to my cousins' chagrin, there's basically no place to eat there.

    My dad came from a town 13 miles away, alongside the interstate (technically, on Route 66 before it was mostly overlaid with I-55), population about 7,000, a town that, despite its similarly dying old Main Street, by virtue of its location next to the interstate, has plenty of gas stations, fast-food restaurants, hotels, sit-down restaurants, Chinese and pizza carry-out places, and a Super Walmart.

    You shouldn't assume that people who travel away from urban areas and interstates in the US (or the people who live in such places) eat at chain restaurants because they are afraid of nonchain local places or that they're unadventurous or unsophisticated or lazy. Away from the interstate system and from towns at junctions of US or state highways, the dining options---even chains, much less nonchains--- are very often few and sometimes none. Jane and Michael Stern's Roadfood enterprise would never have been so successful if it weren't as uncommon as it is to find "hidden gem" dining options away from urban areas and interstates.

    There are about 4 million miles of roads in the US; about 1% are interstates; another 2-3% are US highways. If you say you have no trouble finding decent to good to "hidden gem" local eateries while driving around the US, I'd conclude you don't often stray very far from the 4% of the road system that carries the vast majority of the traffic. But many, many millions of people do live farther away than that from such options, and have to drive farther than we, up here in the big city and leafy suburbs, have to drive to get to them.


    Yup. I grew up in a Michigan town with a population of under 2,000. There is a bar that was famous for it's gizzards that was open for my entire childhood, but that's about it. (My Methodist Grandmother refused to step foot inside because it was a bar) For a brief glorious time, we had Los Robles, a Mexican restaurant run by a Guatemalen woman who had married a local boy, but it only lasted a few years. When I was 16 we got our first stoplight, and then a McDonald's. The only pizza in town was sold a Frank's Party store. It was actually pretty good, but only sold by the slice. There are lots and lots of small towns out there that just don't have any dining options, let alone enough to have a choice.
  • Post #99 - May 31st, 2019, 3:40 am
    Post #99 - May 31st, 2019, 3:40 am Post #99 - May 31st, 2019, 3:40 am
    I’m an East Coast native, so I am biased. In my humble opinion, most Chicago-style thin crust is at best mediocre and subpar: Cloyingly sweet tomato sauce, industrial mozzarella, cracker-y and oh-too-crisp crust, etc.
  • Post #100 - May 31st, 2019, 3:34 pm
    Post #100 - May 31st, 2019, 3:34 pm Post #100 - May 31st, 2019, 3:34 pm
    I’m an East Coast native, so I am biased. In my humble opinion, Chicago deep-dish pizza (e.g. Lou Malnati's) is an awesomely delicious culinary miracle, one that got me to forever rethink my feelings towards the foldable over-oreganoed greasy crap I grew up with. :twisted:

    $.02
  • Post #101 - June 1st, 2019, 2:25 pm
    Post #101 - June 1st, 2019, 2:25 pm Post #101 - June 1st, 2019, 2:25 pm
    ld111134 wrote:I’m an East Coast native, so I am biased. In my humble opinion, most Chicago-style thin crust is at best mediocre and subpar: Cloyingly sweet tomato sauce, industrial mozzarella, cracker-y and oh-too-crisp crust, etc.
    My wife (also an east coaster) says the same thing, particularly the crust. In her opinion, the best case scenario is that it's like a cracker and in many instances it's closer to a soggy cracker.
  • Post #102 - June 1st, 2019, 2:35 pm
    Post #102 - June 1st, 2019, 2:35 pm Post #102 - June 1st, 2019, 2:35 pm
    admich wrote:
    ld111134 wrote:I’m an East Coast native, so I am biased. In my humble opinion, most Chicago-style thin crust is at best mediocre and subpar: Cloyingly sweet tomato sauce, industrial mozzarella, cracker-y and oh-too-crisp crust, etc.
    My wife (also an east coaster) says the same thing, particularly the crust. In her opinion, the best case scenario is that it's like a cracker and in many instances it's closer to a soggy cracker.

    Have you been to some of the top places?

    Vito & Nick's Pizzeria
    8433 S Pulaski Rd, Chicago

    Villa Nova Pizzeria
    6821 W Pershing Rd, Stickney

    Marie's Pizza & Liquors
    4129 W Lawrence Ave, Chicago

    In my experience the sweet sauce is mostly on the southside and as a spillover from Indiana.

    I can believe that heading into some of the not recommended neighborhood places can give you mixed results.

    As always look for LTH recommended places. :)

    As always if you do find a subpar pizza place please post about it here so we know to avoid it.
    "Very good... but not my favorite." ~ Johnny Depp as Roux the Gypsy in Chocolat
  • Post #103 - June 1st, 2019, 2:46 pm
    Post #103 - June 1st, 2019, 2:46 pm Post #103 - June 1st, 2019, 2:46 pm
    These debates are silly. Like saying I prefer mac & cheese to fettucine alfredo. They're different interpretations. No reason you can't appreciate Neapolitan pizza, Sicilian pizza, any of Chicago's styles and New York style on their respective merits. But a "X is better than Y" makes as much sense as saying "I like hamburgers more than Italian beef."
  • Post #104 - June 1st, 2019, 3:02 pm
    Post #104 - June 1st, 2019, 3:02 pm Post #104 - June 1st, 2019, 3:02 pm
    Panther in the Den wrote:
    admich wrote:
    ld111134 wrote:I’m an East Coast native, so I am biased. In my humble opinion, most Chicago-style thin crust is at best mediocre and subpar: Cloyingly sweet tomato sauce, industrial mozzarella, cracker-y and oh-too-crisp crust, etc.
    My wife (also an east coaster) says the same thing, particularly the crust. In her opinion, the best case scenario is that it's like a cracker and in many instances it's closer to a soggy cracker.

    Have you been to some of the top places?

    Vito & Nick's Pizzeria
    8433 S Pulaski Rd, Chicago

    Villa Nova Pizzeria
    6821 W Pershing Rd, Stickney

    Marie's Pizza & Liquors
    4129 W Lawrence Ave, Chicago

    In my experience the sweet sauce is mostly on the southside and as a spillover from Indiana.

    I can believe that heading into some of the not recommended neighborhood places can give you mixed results.

    As always look for LTH recommended places. :)

    As always if you do find a subpar pizza place please post about it here so we know to avoid it.


    Yes, and Wells Brothers. IMHO, the best Chicago thin-style with its under-proofed dough is, at-best, on par with generic New York slice shop pizza. It belies it’s origins as a cheap bar snack that can be prepared by people without much pizza-making skill.

    I will say, however, that places like V&N, Villa Nova and Wells Brothers serve pies with outstanding Italian sausage.
  • Post #105 - June 1st, 2019, 4:01 pm
    Post #105 - June 1st, 2019, 4:01 pm Post #105 - June 1st, 2019, 4:01 pm
    ld111134 wrote:Yes, and Wells Brothers. IMHO, the best Chicago thin-style with its under-proofed dough is, at-best, on par with generic New York slice shop pizza. It belies it’s origins as a cheap bar snack that can be prepared by people without much pizza-making skill.

    I will say, however, that places like V&N, Villa Nova and Wells Brothers serve pies with outstanding Italian sausage.

    puh-lenty of awful pizza on the east coast too. like it's all artisanal wonderfulneas there. what a joke!
  • Post #106 - June 3rd, 2019, 8:22 am
    Post #106 - June 3rd, 2019, 8:22 am Post #106 - June 3rd, 2019, 8:22 am
    Of course there is bad pizza in Chicago. There is bad pizza everywhere.

    On the NYC vs Chicago (not sure why this even comes up) thing. I have yet to visit NYC so I've only had their main two styles of pizza (gas oven street slice and coal oven) elsewhere in the country. For example I had the famous Di Fara in Las Vegas. One of the worst pizzas I've ever had and I am not trying to pick on them. I can only assume that it's similar to Pizzeria Uno vs Uno Chicago Grill across the country. I have never had a slice of NY pizza anywhere that blew me away even from New York natives who were making it. Well there was one time in St. Pete, FL that might have been decent. But none of the joints that do this style in Chicago that I've had make me want to return. The biggest flaw is the sauce. The second biggest is if they put sliced sausage on the pizza. It can't compare to Chicago bulk sausage. But in their defense New York is not a sausage town; we are.

    On the other had I've had Grimaldi's Coal Oven Pizza (the chain) many times in many states and I really like it. There was one in Taylor, MI until last summer that closed as no one went there (next to a Primanti Bros. - the legendary Pittsburgh restaurant). Imagine that. An authentic (from what I have been told) coal oven New York/Brooklyn pizza restaurant that couldn't compete with the mediocre suburban pizza chains. There wasn't even a Buddy's Pizza in that area yet (there will be soon). In other words, you couldn't get authentic Detroit square pizza (I've never had a bad one of this style yet FYI) in that entire area (Downriver) and Grimaldi's (easily the best option in the area to me by far) still couldn't last. Anyway, I look forward to the day I can finally hit a bunch of the best of NYC. But better than the best Chicago thin crust? No. They will be different. Different is good.

Contact

About

Team

Advertize

Close

Chat

Articles

Guide

Events

more