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  • Post #61 - July 19th, 2010, 12:51 pm
    Post #61 - July 19th, 2010, 12:51 pm Post #61 - July 19th, 2010, 12:51 pm
    thaiobsessed: I was impressed with your bagel-making skills . . . I assume you will be sampling the Montreal-style bagels on your trip? Seems like a must to me since they're very different from what we get here and in NY.
  • Post #62 - July 19th, 2010, 8:49 pm
    Post #62 - July 19th, 2010, 8:49 pm Post #62 - July 19th, 2010, 8:49 pm
    BR wrote:thaiobsessed: I was impressed with your bagel-making skills . . . I assume you will be sampling the Montreal-style bagels on your trip? Seems like a must to me since they're very different from what we get here and in NY.


    Oh, definitely. I've never tried Montreal-style bagels but once I heard that they are wood-fired...well, that practically inspired the trip. I'm hoping I can get some back through customs.
  • Post #63 - July 19th, 2010, 8:55 pm
    Post #63 - July 19th, 2010, 8:55 pm Post #63 - July 19th, 2010, 8:55 pm
    thaiobsessed wrote:Oh, definitely. I've never tried Montreal-style bagels but once I heard that they are wood-fired...well, that practically inspired the trip. I'm hoping I can get some back through customs.


    It should be no problem getting bagels through customs. My parents bring a dozen every time they fly to Chicago from Montreal. I think customs is mainly worried about fruit, vegetables, and meat.

    Patrick
  • Post #64 - July 20th, 2010, 1:11 am
    Post #64 - July 20th, 2010, 1:11 am Post #64 - July 20th, 2010, 1:11 am
    I've never had a problem bringing back breads and bagels - in rather large quantities and I've done it often.
  • Post #65 - July 20th, 2010, 8:21 am
    Post #65 - July 20th, 2010, 8:21 am Post #65 - July 20th, 2010, 8:21 am
    No problem with bagels and customs. Just do it.

    Now the issue, of course, is which Montréal bagel? Bagels are argued in Montréal like bbq is argued in Kansas City. The only recourse is to try both! And, of course, you have to line up at the bakery and eat the bagels fresh, right there in situ.

    Also, the Fairmont makes what The Other Dr. Gale—a native New Yorker—thinks is the best matzoh in the universe. [Unfortunately, she really doesn't like Montréal bagels; so, I eat the bagels, and she eats the matzoh! :) ]

    Geo

    http://www.fairmountbagel.com/eng/index.htm

    http://www.stviateurbagel.com/main/
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #66 - August 12th, 2010, 8:59 am
    Post #66 - August 12th, 2010, 8:59 am Post #66 - August 12th, 2010, 8:59 am
    We had a great long weekend trip to Montreal. I'm trying not to be bitter about the cornicopia of good bread and pastries available there (not to mention the markets!) while perusing the post on good baguettes (or lack there of) in Chicago.

    A couple places on my list (Graziella and L' p'tit plateau) were closed for renovations/vacation. The woman from L' p'tit plateau must think I'm crazy because I kept calling to see if they were open yet (alas, the came back from vacation the day after we left). But we had some really terrific meals there. Even if we had not gone into a single restaurant, we would have eaten well, given all the great bakeries and markets.

    Here are some highlights:
    Au Montee du Lait: We loved this cute little storefront on St. Laurent. The menu is fairly small arranged as 'bites', appetizers and mains (4 of each). The bites were literally bites (priced at $2-3 each) which was fun because we got to try several different things. Highlights of the meal for me were a fried shrimp skewere from the bites section (which seemed like it would be pedestrian but was absolutely delicious with a remoulade-like sauce), a tuna tartare salad appetizer and the pork belly with cherry tomatoes and gnocchi. The pork belly was out-of-this-world--each part of the dish was perfect and the whole was more than the some of its parts. The belly itself had a delicious crisp skin with interior meat that was luscious and unctious. A second entree--sea bass with fresh and cooked fennel was a bit of a miss. I love fennel but I thought the dish lacked dimension. The dessert was pretty forgetable--a peach tasting consisting of a bit of cake, fresh peaches and a peach milkshake. The cheese selection on the cheese plate were very nice. Service was terrific and we really enjoyed their selection of wines by the glass.

    L'express: Great experience. This place has been called over-hyped on other sites. I did not find that at all. The restaurant has a classic bistro feel--the space is a little cramped and the place was very busy. But service was warm and the food was terrific. We shared the warm goat cheese salad, a pasta dish with fresh chantarelles (our waiter 'down-sold' it when we debating between that and the lobster risotto) and the hanger steak with shallot butter. Each was executed perfectly. I can't wait to try to replicate the pasta (per our waiter, the chef sautees the chantarelles in butter, gradually adds veal stock, then more butter--yeah!). The dessert was the only miss (apple crisp which was served cold). If I go back to Montreal, I will definitely be eating here again.

    XO: We didn't really eat a meal here but we stayed in the adjoining hotel (Le St-James) and we got hungry one afternoon and stopped by for a (very expensive) snack in the lounge of this very elegant/opulent space. I would seriously think about eating here on a return trip (especially the prix-fixe/table d'hote lunch which is reasonable) based on a perusal of the menu and the very delicious mini burgers and popcorn shrimp we had as snacks.

    Bonaparte: We had lunch at Bonaparte, though we ordered from the dinner menu. The goat cheese wrapped in phyllo dough served on a bed of greens was delicious but we thought the mains were just so-so (veal chop and scallops). Overall, not a placed I'd return to.

    Le Roi du Plateau: We had an absolutely lovely time here. Thanks, Geo, for this gem of a recommendation (we never would have found this little place without you). We enjoyed getting to try Portuguese food, the proprietors were exceptionally warm, the food was inexpensive, expertly prepared and delicious. I don't have many restaurant pics because my camera does poorly in low light. But here are a few pics from the early part of our meal before it got dark inside.

    Chorico appetizer: Image

    Grilled squid: Image

    We also had the shrimp and garlic and an asparagus salad. I regretted that we didn't order the grilled chicken after seeing a few plates of it stroll past (and a really delicious looking red ?chili sauce along with it).

    The Jean-Talon market was fabulous, as has been noted above, and practically made we weep with envy.

    Here are a few more pics:

    Image

    Image

    Image

    Image

    We took Geo's advice and stopped at Premiere Moisson after we had finished stuffing ourselves in the market proper.

    Image


    To the owners of Premiere Moisson (or Au Pain D'ore for that matter) if you are listening. Pretty please, with sugar on top, consider an outpost of your bakery in Chicago. I will take you house-hunting, mow your lawn, etc, etc...

    Anyway, we ended up passing on Schwartz's (I'm just not a deli fan) but we did have ice cream across the street.
    View from the ice cream store across from Schwartz's

    Image

    We did go to the St. Viateur cafe on St. Denis and purchased 1 dozen bagels that were so fresh (and hot!), I could barely carry them due to the temperature. We enjoyed one right away (delicious!) and the rest are safely in my freezer.

    We wanted to check out this mushroom-themed store but we were a little late...next trip.

    Image
  • Post #67 - August 12th, 2010, 9:24 am
    Post #67 - August 12th, 2010, 9:24 am Post #67 - August 12th, 2010, 9:24 am
    thaiobsessed: beautiful write-up and pictures. Too bad about Le P'tit Plateau, but it sounds like you ate very well. And I completely agree about Première Moisson - nothing nearly as good in Chicago.
  • Post #68 - August 12th, 2010, 9:31 am
    Post #68 - August 12th, 2010, 9:31 am Post #68 - August 12th, 2010, 9:31 am
    Great report thaiobsessed! I'm so glad that you had a great time in my hometown #1! Made me sad, too, since I'm now on my way to KC for Fall semester, leaving the delightful Other Dr. Gale alone in Montréal, munching away on Premiere Moisson's fare. (I shouldn't brag, but we can reach Marché Jean-Talon from our front porch in 4+ mins by bike! : )

    Also really pleased that you enjoyed Le Roi de Plateau, one of our very favorite places in the whole world. That sausage shot made my mouth water: the owner finally told me where he buys it (in a Portuguese deli on rue Duluth), and now we enjoy it grilled at home.

    Hope we're in town next time you come up! But you did awfully well on your own, it seems!

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #69 - August 13th, 2010, 12:17 am
    Post #69 - August 13th, 2010, 12:17 am Post #69 - August 13th, 2010, 12:17 am
    thaiobsessed - thank you for the photo trip to Montreal! It's such a wondrous food city (and general living city too)

    I'd share lawn mowing chores if Pain D'ore would open here ... in fact when I stay in Montreal, I normally go to the Omni since it's just up the hill from their Peel St shop so breakfast and lunch and afternoon snacks are a quick walk away (and I can dash in before heading to the airport to fill my suitcase with breads to rush home and freeze for future joys.)
  • Post #70 - August 13th, 2010, 10:11 am
    Post #70 - August 13th, 2010, 10:11 am Post #70 - August 13th, 2010, 10:11 am
    Can't comment on their selections, since I haven't been where they went, but for those who may be interested, the New York Times just posted a "36 Hours in Montreal" here. (Free registration may be required)
    Gypsy Boy

    "I am not a glutton--I am an explorer of food." (Erma Bombeck)
  • Post #71 - February 15th, 2012, 12:54 pm
    Post #71 - February 15th, 2012, 12:54 pm Post #71 - February 15th, 2012, 12:54 pm
    Well, I get to go back to Montreal for work in a few weeks and I'm planning to spend a couple extra days there to eat. Anyone have updates?
    I may have to go back to L'express. L' p'tit plateau is on the list and we're thinking about cinquieme peche.
  • Post #72 - February 15th, 2012, 1:12 pm
    Post #72 - February 15th, 2012, 1:12 pm Post #72 - February 15th, 2012, 1:12 pm
    We went last summer. Per our friends' recommendation, we enjoyed dinner at LaLoux in the Plateau area. Fresh, seasonal ingredients, perfect execution. Don't be discouraged if you can't make reservations at a reasonable time. We walked right in on a weeknight around 7 or so, and there was plenty of seating available.

    250 Pine Avenue East
    Montreal Quebec H2W 1P3
    T: 514 287-9127

    Will you have a chance to go to a Sugar Shack? I would be very envious of you!
  • Post #73 - February 15th, 2012, 1:21 pm
    Post #73 - February 15th, 2012, 1:21 pm Post #73 - February 15th, 2012, 1:21 pm
    Le Quartier General continues to get very good ink.

    Sugar shack would be a very nice experience, for sure. [And I must rejoice: after two years' hard trying, we've *finally* scored reservations at Au Pied de Cochon's cabane à sucre! We are sooooo jazzed about that! ]

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #74 - February 15th, 2012, 9:19 pm
    Post #74 - February 15th, 2012, 9:19 pm Post #74 - February 15th, 2012, 9:19 pm
    Pucca wrote: Per our friends' recommendation, we enjoyed dinner at LaLoux in the Plateau area. Fresh, seasonal ingredients, perfect execution.


    Geo wrote:Le Quartier General continues to get very good ink


    So, I made a reservation at LaLoux and e-mailed Le Quartier General to see if they have an opening.

    Any idea about whether one can have a sugar shack experience on a weekday?
  • Post #75 - February 15th, 2012, 10:16 pm
    Post #75 - February 15th, 2012, 10:16 pm Post #75 - February 15th, 2012, 10:16 pm
    I've been a couple of times to Constantin Gregoire's sugar shack. It's well-run, about half an hour from Montréal, and open during the week. Plus, you can bring your own wine. I'd give them a call. Someone there will have enough English to get you booked! :) They typically open in early March; but this year, with our warm Winter, maybe earlier. You'll really like the place, they're good folks.

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #76 - March 24th, 2012, 8:43 am
    Post #76 - March 24th, 2012, 8:43 am Post #76 - March 24th, 2012, 8:43 am
    Geo and Pucca,
    Thanks for the great recs. Our two best meals of the trip were at Laloux and Le Quartier General. I was there partly for a work commitment so I didn't end up having time to get to a Cabane a Sucre. Next trip...(though next trip might have to be when the weather is warmer--we were there during a cold snap this trip).

    Laloux:
    Laloux has a classic French bistro feel with warm lighting, a dark wood bar, tiled floors and white tablecloths.
    We experienced an incredibly friendly reception the moment we walked in and service was warm and helpful throughout the meal. Our server gave us great recs for wine and food and there was not a single 'miss' amongst the dishes we tried. We were really impressed with the quality and variety of local ingredients (at both Laloux and Le Quartier General).
    We started with a seared beef tartare--the beef was seared before it was chopped giving it a nice smoky flavor--served with marinated mushrooms and a black garlic dressing. Our second starter was a 'hemp puff pastry' with oyster mushrooms and caramelized onions, also excellent. For mains, we shared a flank steak with caramelized turnips and a brussel sprout salad with buttermilk dressing as well as a seared scallop dish with black gnocchi. I never would have picked our dessert which featured meyer lemon, poppyseed cake and white chocolate crumbles. But our server was so on-target, we went with her recommendation. The dessert was great (and I don't really even like white chocolate). This was the kind of place I would love, love, love to have in Chicago (along with a Premier Moisson...).

    Le Quartier General:
    This place totally had the feel of a GNR, especially given it's location a little off-the-beaten-track on a side street in/on? the Plateau. It's also BYOB which was nice. For appetizers, we split the pork shoulder 'egg roll' which was excellent, and the crab cake which was pretty average and a little too bready for me. For mains, I had the veal chop, which was wonderful, and my dining companion had the lamb shank, which was transcendent. After my first bite of the veal, I didn't think a taste of another dish could make me jealous, but I was wrong. For dessert, we split a piece of the blueberry cheesecake (again, a dessert I wouldn't have chosen but was recommended by our server) and it was really, really good, and a piece of the apple crumble (which we didn't love and wasn't really a crumble). The hits were terrific and easily counted the misses. I'd definitely go back here (even if the lamb shank was the only thing on the menu). Also, it was very reasonable (I believe adding an entree and a dessert to the price of the main was $12).
  • Post #77 - March 24th, 2012, 10:51 am
    Post #77 - March 24th, 2012, 10:51 am Post #77 - March 24th, 2012, 10:51 am
    That's great, thaiobsessed! Sounds like you had a super time. The Other Dr. Gale and I will definitely have to try Lalou.

    Sorry you couldn't make a sugar shack... We finally got into Au Pied de Cochon's shack last month. It was s i m p l y incredible.

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #78 - June 11th, 2012, 10:12 am
    Post #78 - June 11th, 2012, 10:12 am Post #78 - June 11th, 2012, 10:12 am
    We just got back from a trip to Montreal, and I wanted to add a couple of things. We slummed it food-wise (I find Montreal a good bit more expensive than Chicago, and my wife and I trend frugal), so I don't have anything to say about the nicer sit-down restaurants. Schwartz's was an incredible smoked meat sandwich, and deserving of all its accolades.

    However, a few doors down there was a place called "Charcuterie Hongroise" that intrigued me, having been in the mood for some good Hungarian sausages for quite a long time. Inside, there was your typical deli, selling a smattering of Hungarian and Eastern European products including Pick salami, but also a selection of hot food, including Debrizener/Debreceni sausage sandwiches. I'm always on the search for a good debreceni, and they tend to be hard to find. I'm not impressed with Bende's version--it was drier than what I think of as a standard debreceni sausage--and the versions I've had in Cleveland have also been of the dry type (although they were quite good.) This is what I look for when I'm in the mood for a debricener.

    Charcuterie Hongroise's version was dead-on. Lightly smoked, boiled, and served split on a bun (and I opted for mustard, of course). The texture was perfect: distinct pockets of fat, but not overly greasy or mealy. Think of a texture more towards a frankfurter than a fresh Italian sausage, but with little dice of fat throughout. It was garlicky, but not aggressively so. The paprika flavor was in perfect balance with it, and the sausage was pleasantly salty and moist. And, of course, a little snap from the natural casing. Absolutely perfect rendition. The wife voted for the sausage sandwich over Schwartz's smoked meat sandwich, although I think they were both equally good, just different.

    We also popped into a few places for poutine--La Banquise, Chef Guru (a curry version of poutine), and Decarie (famous for their hot dogs). All within 24 hours, and none in any state of intoxication (which may be the most amazing part.) I'll be boring and say I liked the La Banquise version the best. La Banquise has over 25 different kinds of poutine, but we just opted for the classic: fries, gravy, and curds. The fries were cooked perfectly--crispy brown, yet moist and fluffy on the inside--, not drowning in gravy, not overly salted, curds still had the squeak, and fun, busy atmosphere. The only possible minus here is the gravy was a bid on the bland side, but I thought it worked fine in context. Chef Guru's was the most interesting, with a spicy curry sauce and cilantro, but it was just a soggy mess in the end. I've had people swear this is the best poutine in Montreal, and I could see how one might think so, but it wasn't for me. The fries were mushy and seemed to be fried only once. Perhaps I needed to be inebriated to really discover their magic. Decarie's poutine was solid, with an aggressively spiced gravy that I swear had curry powder in it, although none of the online reviews mention curry for Decarie. Still, it reminded me a lot of those "curry chips" one might get at an English or Irish pub. I'd be shocked if it wasn't curry.

    Decarie's... what can I say about this place? It's a little greasy hole-in-the-wall that's way out there at one of the terminuses of the orange metro line. Our last night there, we took a trip, hearing that it has Montreal's best hot dogs, called "steamies." Steamies are steamed hot dogs, served in steamed buns, topped with mustard, onion, sauerkraut. They are presented to you wrapped in wax paper, kind of like a Tom-Tom tamale. Honestly, I don't quite understand their appeal. The sausage is a skinless hot dog of some type which, to me, didn't taste much better than a generic grocery store hot dog. I tried to enjoy the hot dog on its own terms, but I just couldn't summon up any enthusiasm for it. We tried other non-Chicago non-all-beef hot dogs on this trip, like Ted's in Buffalo and Heid's in Syracuse/Liverpool, and those were all very good hot dogs by my metric. But I was utterly perplexed by Decarie's steamies. Maybe I need to go back and completely shed all preconceptions of what a hot dog should be. I feel like I'm experiencing the same confusion as David Hammond did in the White Castle thread, because obviously there are a lot of people who love Decarie's, and in a certain way, it's like a hot dog version of White Castle hamburgers (although without the overwhelming salty onionness.)

    Charcuterie Hongroise
    843 boul. Saint-Laurent
    Montréal, QC

    Decarie Hot Dog
    953 Boulevard Decarie
    Saint-Laurent, QC

    Resto la Banquise
    994 Rue Rachel E
    Montréal, QC

    Chef Guru
    4120 boulevard Saint-Laurent
    Montreal, QC H2W1Y8
  • Post #79 - June 11th, 2012, 11:07 am
    Post #79 - June 11th, 2012, 11:07 am Post #79 - June 11th, 2012, 11:07 am
    Binko,

    I can't *believe* that you came up here without getting hold of me first! First, the Montréal "steamie" is a totally non-descript soggy mess, as you note. Its only claim to fame is that it's been around a long time, and people grew up with it. More interesting is the "toastie" Michigan hot dog [here and here, which still isn't great.

    You missed a whole bunch of good sausages, for example, the Polish sausages and soups at Euro-deli Batory, the grilled Romanian mici at Balkani in marché Jean-Talon, the great sausage sandwiches at Slovenian deli, etc. etc. etc.

    You've steered me right a bunch of times, Binko-- let me reciprocate, next time you come up to Montréal! :)

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #80 - June 11th, 2012, 11:45 am
    Post #80 - June 11th, 2012, 11:45 am Post #80 - June 11th, 2012, 11:45 am
    Geo wrote:Binko,

    I can't *believe* that you came up here without getting hold of me first! First, the Montréal "steamie" is a totally non-descript soggy mess, as you note. Its only claim to fame is that it's been around a long time, and people grew up with it. More interesting is the "toastie" Michigan hot dog [here and here, which still isn't great.

    You missed a whole bunch of good sausages, for example, the Polish sausages and soups at Euro-deli Batory, the grilled Romanian mici at Balkani in marché Jean-Talon, the great sausage sandwiches at Slovenian deli, etc. etc. etc.

    You've steered me right a bunch of times, Binko-- let me reciprocate, next time you come up to Montréal! :)

    Geo


    I would certainly love to come back. I actually did enjoy what I found, and I kind of wanted a nice mix of classic Montreal eats with a few random finds. I also popped into Fairmount Bakery (very good bagels--I do think I prefer them to New York bagels, although I am not a bagel afficianado), Rotisserie Romados for their Portuguese chicken (solid chicken, good for the price, but not mind-blowing like the piri-piri I've had in South Africa.) Found a lovely bar called Else's in the neighborhood which we visited every night. It was exactly my mix of people. Also checked out Benelux brewpub (solid microbrews, visited twice.) The mici would have been up my alley, though I probably would skip the Polish sausage (I get more than enough of it here. :) ) I hope to be back.

    On the drive back down, we hit a couple of cideries just south of Montreal -- Ciderie du Minot and La Face Cachée De La Pomme. Both had solid straightforward ciders, but I loved the ice ciders, especially La Face Cachee's Neige varieties. Simply incredible stuff--I never had cider like it. Basically, they pick the apples, keep them in a cool place until December, juice them, put the juice outside in 1000L tubs, wait for the water to freeze off, and ferment the resulting concentrated syrup. Their information sheet says that 1/5 of the original volume is fermented. It produces a very sweet, yet still pleasantly tart, concentrated cider not unlike an ice wine. I've never had anything like it. Apparently, they sell one of their versions, Neige Premiere, at Binny's here in Chicago. They have another variety, La Face Cachée de la Pomme Neige Recolte D’Hiver (which I haven't seen here), that is made more like an ice wine: with apples that are left on the tree until they shrivel and freeze in December.I would definitely recommend checking out Quebec's ciders.
  • Post #81 - June 11th, 2012, 12:43 pm
    Post #81 - June 11th, 2012, 12:43 pm Post #81 - June 11th, 2012, 12:43 pm
    Sounds like you did ok on your own, Binko! :D And yeah, I *knew* I could get your attention with my mention of the grilled mici--I think we've talked about it before.

    Yes, Québec's cidres are excellent, and some of the ice cidres are incredible. La face cachée is excellent. Our favorite is Michel Jodoin in Rougemont, about 35km east of La face's place. He also makes an apple brandy which is simply luscious. Every early February, Rougemont hosts the Le Mondial des Cidres de Glace, which has all the important producers showing their wares in a wonderful ice-cave; additionally, there is a building full of other Québec agriculteurs--sausage, foie gras, cheese, etc.--sampling their wares as well. It's a most excellent weekend, and well worth a visit.

    Glad you had a good time--but let me know next time you visit!

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #82 - June 13th, 2012, 1:50 pm
    Post #82 - June 13th, 2012, 1:50 pm Post #82 - June 13th, 2012, 1:50 pm
    The best hot dogs in Montreal are at Gibeau Orange Julep, 7700 Décarie Boulevard.

    And it's hard to miss, seeing as how this is what it looks like:

    Image
  • Post #83 - June 13th, 2012, 2:39 pm
    Post #83 - June 13th, 2012, 2:39 pm Post #83 - June 13th, 2012, 2:39 pm
    And the locals swear by the Orange 'Julius' there, too. Dunn's, which isn't all that bad smoked meat, is right across the street, too.

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #84 - June 13th, 2012, 3:10 pm
    Post #84 - June 13th, 2012, 3:10 pm Post #84 - June 13th, 2012, 3:10 pm
    Geo wrote:And the locals swear by the Orange 'Julius' there, too. Dunn's, which isn't all that bad smoked meat, is right across the street, too.

    Geo


    Snowden Deli is right there too, and it's amazing.
  • Post #85 - August 25th, 2012, 11:25 pm
    Post #85 - August 25th, 2012, 11:25 pm Post #85 - August 25th, 2012, 11:25 pm
    Spent a few days in Montreal - mostly holed up at a conference with only one afternoon/evening off but thanks to this thread and mostly to Geo it was still a fantastic trip.
    I was holed up across from McGill on Rue Sherbrooke and most eats were at places close by.

    The first evening was a quick bite and brew at Brutopia. Decent pub style offerings, the nod to Mexican inspired dishes is owed to the Mexican staff.
    Other quick dinners were at Basha (below a Tim Hortons, where I had one sad breakfast).
    Great value in lebanese offerings - from merguez to kebabs
    Image Image Image Image Image

    Beer on evening at les trois brasseurs...

    Then one fine (free) afternoon a super lunch with Geo - simple (Portuguese) honest food
    Image
    chorizo, sardines, octopus (under the potatoes), greens
    Image

    Marche Jean Talon was as advertised - arguably the best market in (N.)America...
    Full from lunch we only stopped for a bit at Balkani Montreal
    Image Image
    That was some super mici (If it wasn't for Geo I might have had the other half ;))

    We stopped at Le Marche des Saveurs du Quebec where specialties of the region stuck their tongues out at me as I mentally calculated how much liquid and other comestibles I could take with me.
    Image Image
    Image Image

    More strolling around (to let the food settle down)
    Image Image
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    and then after some grazing with our eyes
    Image Image
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    I had to sit down with a bit of pie (fish) that was just light and delightfully spiced
    Image

    Later that evening was "banquet food" (actually not too bad, but I'll spare you the pics)

    With such flavor in the local berries, even simple breakfasts at Second Cup were great
    Image

    With the taste of what Montreal food could be like, I couldn't let what I thought was my last day in Montreal go to waste. I managed to squeeze in a brisk walk to Schwartz's. Had walked up and past it a couple of evenings before and the line was daunting and had skipped it. Not any more.
    Image
    Now that is a sandwich! (and I felt an order of magnitude better value than my first/last one at Katz's a couple of month's ago)
    Best part is in spite of the line, I went to to the 'take out' counter next door and got it right away
    Image Image
    The door is to the left (behind the last person in line)
    Image

    Last evening in town was walking up to Dieu de Ciel
    Image
    which was quite busy when we got to it and a got thing we got a couple of seats at the bar.
    Image
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    I had a few, tasted some other that my friend had - some great brews. I thoroughly enjoyed the raushbier #13)
    Image Image Image
    The pickles we ordered were stellar - crisp, just a touch of sweetness and a late mild surprise hint of spiciness. Given that I had just had some excellent pickle at lunch (Schwartz's), this was just super. [for the curious, the pickles are made by the manager's mom; I couldn't get a recipe]
    A touch hungry we got the charcuterie plate. This is probably the best C$15 I've spent in a long time.
    Image
    This was sourced (I found out) from Le Fou du Cochon and besides the two sausages that were excellent, there were two standouts - the pickled peppers in the small dish and the pork tenderloin
    LA FESSE À WOLFE
    Ce Jambonneau biologique est vieillit dans la cendre durant environ six mois. ll fond en bouche' Son nom évoque un éplsode dramattque de I'Hlstoire du Québec : La fin de l'été 1759 où les villages du littoral de la Côtedu-Sud ont été lnoendiés sous les ordres du général James Wolfe

    Translation (via Google translate): This knuckle biological aging in the ash for about six months. It melts in your mouth 'His name evokes a éplsode dramattque I'Hlstoire of Quebec: The end of the summer of 1759 when the coastal villages of South Côtedu lnoendiés were under the command of General James Wolfe
    Image

    This was something really special. I'm a big fan of blue cheese - you eat it and you can feel it is alive in your mouth and breath. Likewise this meat was alive and long and glorious at that.

    The 'kitchen' at Dieu de Ciel is a tiny bit behind the bar - and I hope to sample more of what they can whip up, on or off-menu (as in the right)
    Image Image

    After this, on the somewhat wet walk back, we ducked into Patati patata (recommended by the guy in immigration on my way in, besides Pied du cochon). Decent poutine (my first, but not last).

    I was weatherized in Montreal the next day and stuck in a hotel near the airport with a Subway and some 'pub' as the only options for a late late lunch. The meat pie at the pub totally sucked.
    Image Image

    The hotel dining spot had this interesting table setup (is this getting common? Never got to see it being made)
    Image
    Too tired to get back to town, the last day was spent recovering from the exhausting trip in the hotel. There was some amusing reading material in the room (and dining area).
    Image

    Ah Montreal! I will be back! What a great city - the baseline is so high and such diversity of (food) offerings. As someone remarked - whether you are there for lechon or just to letch on, you can't go wrong in Montreal.

    And thanks again Geo!

    Additional pics of Montreal Food and Dieu De Ciel
  • Post #86 - August 26th, 2012, 8:11 am
    Post #86 - August 26th, 2012, 8:11 am Post #86 - August 26th, 2012, 8:11 am
    Great report Das! It was wonderful fun to have you here and show you some of the sights and eats. Next time in Pgh!

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #87 - April 21st, 2013, 1:21 am
    Post #87 - April 21st, 2013, 1:21 am Post #87 - April 21st, 2013, 1:21 am
    My 19-year old daughter will be spending 6-7 weeks in Montreal this summer (July to mid August) and I'm planning to visit one of the weekends she is there. Airfare from ORD is HIGH!!! She will be staying at the Grey Nuns residence doing research with a professor from Concordia U. No dining hall or real cooking facilities so cheap and healthy stuff nearby will be her plan.

    As for my visit, we Will be looking for budget-friendly and true "don't miss" options as we get a little bit closer. Geo, are you still the guru? I'm open to anything though we won't have a car. Thanks in advance!
  • Post #88 - April 21st, 2013, 9:13 am
    Post #88 - April 21st, 2013, 9:13 am Post #88 - April 21st, 2013, 9:13 am
    Sujormik--

    I'm here, and I'll be there. I've taught in the Grey Nuns hall. :) She'll be within a block of some of the best, cheapest Asian food in the city. The cheapest flight ORD--> YUL is Porter.

    We'll stay in touch, eh?

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #89 - July 18th, 2013, 11:11 pm
    Post #89 - July 18th, 2013, 11:11 pm Post #89 - July 18th, 2013, 11:11 pm
    Geo, we are using points and staying at the Marriott downtown, which my girl said is convenient to the subway and her lab and I'm just going with that even though I'd rather be staying someplace more authentic. This whole "week before and I start to get worried I gonna miss something great" mood is bugging me!

    Last chance for the suggestions!
  • Post #90 - July 19th, 2013, 10:04 am
    Post #90 - July 19th, 2013, 10:04 am Post #90 - July 19th, 2013, 10:04 am
    Hi Sue,

    Sorry this reply is late, but I'm down at our Lake cottage and the net keeps going in and out. My suggestions are pretty much limited to what I said in my earlier PM--all those Asian places around Concordia. Do not, under pain of derision from LTHers, miss the Marché Jean-Talon. Take the Orange line to the Jean-Talon station, and it's just a 5-min walk. Go on Saturday, if at all possible. There are a million places to munch, drink and crowd-watch from. It's worth at least half a day to wander all around. if you like frites, get a bag from Frite Alors!, a stand on the south perimeter of stores.

    BTW, if you'd like a high-end special dinner, try to get rezzies at either Joe Beef or Au Pied de Cochon. First place is MTL's best steakhouse, second is a wild Québec experience, with a nice focus on local foie gras. Both are worth a visit.

    Have a great time, and report back!!

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)

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