LTH Home

Rib Tips

Rib Tips
  • Forum HomePost Reply BackTop
     Page 1 of 2
  • Rib Tips

    Post #1 - May 17th, 2007, 12:50 pm
    Post #1 - May 17th, 2007, 12:50 pm Post #1 - May 17th, 2007, 12:50 pm
    Last week there was an article in the Tribune on Rib Tips, I found the various woods and treatments worth noting:

    Like slab ribs, great rib tips go through a three-step process. Season, smoke, serve. It's in that second step where restaurants put their stamp.

    Barbara Ann's uses the traditional combination of hickory and oak to smoke. George's Rib House in Harvey cooks with charcoal instead. The BBQ Pit in Highland Park uses both hickory and charcoal -- hickory for flavor, charcoal to better control temperature -- and cooks at a low 225 degrees. Ribs 'n' Bibs in Hyde Park heats their tips to 400 degrees using hickory and oak. Brothers' Ribs in Palatine (also in Lake Zurich and Mundelein) uses hickory wood, and slow cooks their ribs in a convection smoker for up to three hours.

    Fat Willy's Rib Shack in Logan Square has perhaps the area's most unorthodox preparation. Owner Bo Fowler brines her rib tips in a tub of spices, fruit juices, honey and garlic before smoking the meat with indirect heat using hickory and applewood -- a Southern style of barbecue. After four hours of cooking, the pork is slathered with sauce and grilled to caramelize the exterior.

    They arrive plump, if not outright chubby; arguably the largest rib tips in all of the North Side. They're glazed with the tomato, honey and pineapple-based BBQ sauce, a light enough coat so it accents the star of the show, rather than drowns it. As for the star itself, the tips have a superb charred flavor reminiscent of a back yard cookout. Smoke-pinkened meat, a visual trait BBQ aficionados crave, goes beyond a ring of smoke in these tips -- it's infused with hickory smoke, and you can tell. And taste, too.

    But to find the finest rib tips, your senses will invariably lead you to the South Side.

    Uncle John's BBQ is a corner takeout joint in a residential area at 69th and Calumet. Although barely a year in business, pit master Mack Sevier, with his ever-present Kangol hat, is a grilling veteran. He spent a decade running the aquarium-style smoker at Barbara Ann's.

    Sevier's secret is inside the pit: a trio of hickory, oak and marbury oak. The resulting smoke -- a masculine and saline perfume -- penetrates every morsel of hot link, slab rib and rib tip he serves.

    The marriage of meat and smokiness is so sublime that adding their sweet and warm barbecue sauce, as good as it may be, would be superfluous, like inserting an extra harp into Beethoven's 9th. (If there's anything better at Uncle John's, it's No. 19 -- "Fresh Pork" -- a stunning smoked on-the-bone bacon.)


    For the complete article, then go here, but hurry fast you will likely have to pay after today.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #2 - May 18th, 2007, 4:31 pm
    Post #2 - May 18th, 2007, 4:31 pm Post #2 - May 18th, 2007, 4:31 pm
    Best BBQ I've ever had - Uncle Will's in Houston - uses a mix of white oak and pecan for smoking. Don't know where to suggest finding these. My son sends them to me by UPS from a store in Lubbock, TX, since we don't get to Houston anymore. Pecan is widely used where it's available, and has to be used with discretion- it's quite strong. My son, shortly after he discovered it, smoked the hell out of a Thanksgiving turkey and had to throw it out. Said it tasted like he was eating a tree. :cry:

    Uncle Will's sauce is almost an afterthought. It's a good, middle-of-the-road sauce, not hot, not sweet, and he uses just a little so as not to get in the way of the meat flavor.
    Suburban gourmand
  • Post #3 - May 20th, 2007, 12:16 pm
    Post #3 - May 20th, 2007, 12:16 pm Post #3 - May 20th, 2007, 12:16 pm
    Hillary's, North Chicago!-Dick
  • Post #4 - May 20th, 2007, 7:32 pm
    Post #4 - May 20th, 2007, 7:32 pm Post #4 - May 20th, 2007, 7:32 pm
    HI,

    I made a point of highlighting this article becaue of the different woods and approached to making rib tips. I would be interested in the woods and prep methods people use to make their rib tips.

    Marinating the meat at Sweet Willies was a bit of a surprise to me.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #5 - May 25th, 2007, 2:43 pm
    Post #5 - May 25th, 2007, 2:43 pm Post #5 - May 25th, 2007, 2:43 pm
    'marinating the meat' is not an uncommon technique to gain an edge in competition barbecue.

    the use of fruit juices does enhance the natural 'sweetness of pork meat while the juice acids act as a mild tenderizer.

    apple juice/ apple cider vinegar works well, as does. even better, 'fresh' pineapple juice. (pasteurization kills off the pineapple 'tenderizing' bromelain enzymes, so it's best to 'juice' your own here, if going this route.)

    (apples 'n pork - pineapples 'n pork... mmmm!)

    personally, i think it 'all' mostly lost under the layers of a good rub, proper smoking technique and/if any, finishing glazes or wet sauces added.
    Last edited by jellobee on May 25th, 2007, 5:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #6 - May 25th, 2007, 5:23 pm
    Post #6 - May 25th, 2007, 5:23 pm Post #6 - May 25th, 2007, 5:23 pm
    "different woods"...

    while much has been written about the differing sweetness levels of various fruitwoods, methinks the ordinary human beezer is utterly incapable of discerning any odiferous application of burning hardwoods to their meats...

    that is, unless, one chooses to burn off a noxious and bitter texas weed, otherwise known as mesquite.

    regional caches' aside... ol' hickory will always come thru.
  • Post #7 - May 25th, 2007, 10:35 pm
    Post #7 - May 25th, 2007, 10:35 pm Post #7 - May 25th, 2007, 10:35 pm
    Gotta disagree. Maybe not so much apple vs. cherry, but citrus is darn distinct, as is pimento and some other exotics (e.g., mangrove), at least to my perception.
  • Post #8 - June 24th, 2007, 3:01 pm
    Post #8 - June 24th, 2007, 3:01 pm Post #8 - June 24th, 2007, 3:01 pm
    jellobee wrote:"different woods"...

    while much has been written about the differing sweetness levels of various fruitwoods, methinks the ordinary human beezer is utterly incapable of discerning any odiferous application of burning hardwoods to their meats...

    that is, unless, one chooses to burn off a noxious and bitter texas weed, otherwise known as mesquite.

    regional caches' aside... ol' hickory will always come thru.


    I think you have to smoke the food for upwards of 5-6+ hours before you'll notice differences between different types of woods (there are exceptions, of course).
  • Post #9 - June 24th, 2007, 3:32 pm
    Post #9 - June 24th, 2007, 3:32 pm Post #9 - June 24th, 2007, 3:32 pm
    Sycamore is *very* distinctive: sharp and oily. I only tried it a couple of times, after someone recommended it to me. If memory serves, it was pretty good on squirrel. :^)

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #10 - July 20th, 2008, 3:41 pm
    Post #10 - July 20th, 2008, 3:41 pm Post #10 - July 20th, 2008, 3:41 pm
    howdy all,

    i got a 10lb box of maple leaf rib tips from angelo's market in mchenry- i thought $11.99 for a box of rib tips? why not?

    anyway, i've studied online, how to turn my weber clone into a smoker. check out my sources:
    http://www.bluesmoke-bbq.com/037splitgr ... _grill.php
    http://bbq.netrelief.com/tips/how_to_co ... gill.shtml

    i'm following the first link's plan- but the second link does give me a few tidbits of info.

    my plan- 3 hours in "the smoker". it's up and running NOW. tips went on at 4:30pm.

    i'll let you know how it goes. i'm using hickory chips from the moonlite inn (owensboro, KY) that i just bought today from woodman's in carpentersville.

    let me tell ya this- the hickory smoke- fantastic. and i already smell like a real pitman!

    jim (AKA adipocere)
  • Post #11 - July 20th, 2008, 9:10 pm
    Post #11 - July 20th, 2008, 9:10 pm Post #11 - July 20th, 2008, 9:10 pm
    PERFECT! :D
    even my wife loves them.

    wish my digital camera was functioning- there'd be some great pics.
  • Post #12 - July 21st, 2008, 9:31 am
    Post #12 - July 21st, 2008, 9:31 am Post #12 - July 21st, 2008, 9:31 am
    Sounds delicious, I also wish your camera was working.
  • Post #13 - July 22nd, 2008, 9:32 pm
    Post #13 - July 22nd, 2008, 9:32 pm Post #13 - July 22nd, 2008, 9:32 pm
    are the tips cut up already? i find thsoe dry out easier than if you just cook the spare trimmings whole. I cook whole with rub ..then chop up and throw tips in foil pan with some sauce ..cover pan with foil and throw back on the smoker for awhile..i like my tips a bit more "gringo" than my ribs..
    First Place BBQ Sauce - 2010 NBBQA ( Natl BBQ Assoc) Awards of Excellence
  • Post #14 - July 22nd, 2008, 10:56 pm
    Post #14 - July 22nd, 2008, 10:56 pm Post #14 - July 22nd, 2008, 10:56 pm
    Congratulations. There's nothing more satisfying than success with a smoker (and nothing tastier, either).

    Depending on your smoker, and your level of ambition, LTH regular G Wiv might be a good source of inspiration. I would probably never have tried brining without the guidance of his dandy smoking site:

    http://www.wiviott.com/
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #15 - July 23rd, 2008, 7:25 am
    Post #15 - July 23rd, 2008, 7:25 am Post #15 - July 23rd, 2008, 7:25 am
    Head's Red BBQ wrote:are the tips cut up already? i find thsoe dry out easier than if you just cook the spare trimmings whole. I cook whole with rub ..then chop up and throw tips in foil pan with some sauce ..cover pan with foil and throw back on the smoker for awhile..i like my tips a bit more "gringo" than my ribs..


    no they were whole. still have a couple pounds left!

    ...... anybody tried moo & oink's tips? if there's one thing wrong i found with these canadian tips i bought, is that they're not as meaty as the tips one would typically find at a commercial barbeque. i was wondering if the moo & oink's were meatier.

    jim
  • Post #16 - July 23rd, 2008, 7:35 am
    Post #16 - July 23rd, 2008, 7:35 am Post #16 - July 23rd, 2008, 7:35 am
    adipocere wrote:i was wondering if the moo & oink's were meatier.

    I was at Moo and Oink on W Madison last week, thought the rib tips looked particularly good. I typically buy rib tips, spare ribs, hot links and pork shoulder at Peoria Packing and have been quite pleased over the years.

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    Moo and Oink
    4848 W. Madison
    Chicago, IL
    773-473-4800

    Peoria Packing
    1300 W. Lake
    Chicago IL
    312-738-1800.
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #17 - July 23rd, 2008, 8:11 am
    Post #17 - July 23rd, 2008, 8:11 am Post #17 - July 23rd, 2008, 8:11 am
    adipocere wrote:
    Head's Red BBQ wrote:are the tips cut up already? i find thsoe dry out easier than if you just cook the spare trimmings whole. I cook whole with rub ..then chop up and throw tips in foil pan with some sauce ..cover pan with foil and throw back on the smoker for awhile..i like my tips a bit more "gringo" than my ribs..


    no they were whole. still have a couple pounds left!


    jim

    thats good to know..ive never bought them by themselves so I didnt know how they came . I just trim my own off the spares and cook em along with the spares on the smoker. Almost like the tips more than the actual spare racks :)
    First Place BBQ Sauce - 2010 NBBQA ( Natl BBQ Assoc) Awards of Excellence
  • Post #18 - June 22nd, 2016, 5:08 pm
    Post #18 - June 22nd, 2016, 5:08 pm Post #18 - June 22nd, 2016, 5:08 pm
    Hi,

    Moo and Oink, the store, is gone.

    Moo and Oink rib tips in the freezer section remains. Lewis Market on Grand (do not go to the on on Lewis) in Waukegan has a 10# box on sale for $12.99.

    I will admit I am accustomed to buying this cut where I can look at the meat first. Encased in a box is not how I usually buy my pork products.

    What has been people's experience using the boxed frozen rib tips?

    While this is a retread of question of sorts, in the past those ribs were from the original purveyors. Same box, different owners may or may not affect the standards, whatever they may be.

    Thanks!

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #19 - June 22nd, 2016, 10:01 pm
    Post #19 - June 22nd, 2016, 10:01 pm Post #19 - June 22nd, 2016, 10:01 pm
    I never barbecue tips without making ribs, too. I get spares from my butcher and either he or I separate the tips from the ribs . . . and yes, he does a much better job of it than I do. :D So, St. Louis ribs + tips each time out. They usually need to cook for the same length of time but sometimes the tips find their way to done a bit sooner.

    =R=
    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #20 - June 23rd, 2016, 3:59 am
    Post #20 - June 23rd, 2016, 3:59 am Post #20 - June 23rd, 2016, 3:59 am
    Cathy2 wrote:Hi,

    Moo and Oink, the store, is gone.

    Moo and Oink rib tips in the freezer section remains. Lewis Market on Grand (do not go to the on on Lewis) in Waukegan has a 10# box on sale for $12.99.

    I will admit I am accustomed to buying this cut where I can look at the meat first. Encased in a box is not how I usually buy my pork products.

    What has been people's experience using the boxed frozen rib tips?

    While this is a retread of question of sorts, in the past those ribs were from the original purveyors. Same box, different owners may or may not affect the standards, whatever they may be.

    Thanks!

    Regards,


    Commercial pork is a commodity produced by farmers to a standard that buyers will accept for their packing houses.
    It is lean almost to a fault but i have found no objective variation in whether frozen in a box or thawed in a display case.
    My only source for 'Berkshire' pork has been Mitsuwa and I can find no local source for any 'Heritage' pork from a local producer. I'm not looking to order frozen pork by mail. I have asked local pig farmers if they had any interest in raising 6 'Heritage' pigs for me but it's just not something they want to do as it takes them out of thier comfort zone and is not profitable I think. I get my smaller pigs now from a local packing house in Racine County where they have a source, they are about 40 #'s and are still not as small as I like.
    The little, 5#, piglets used in Spanish restaurants are simply not available here.
    So much for US mass production!-Richard
  • Post #21 - June 23rd, 2016, 9:09 am
    Post #21 - June 23rd, 2016, 9:09 am Post #21 - June 23rd, 2016, 9:09 am
    I have been using "Aunt Bessies" rib tips for years and never been disapointed. Try Ultra foods for the 10 lb boxes.These are made up as slabs ,the only way to grill them.
  • Post #22 - June 23rd, 2016, 11:11 am
    Post #22 - June 23rd, 2016, 11:11 am Post #22 - June 23rd, 2016, 11:11 am
    budrichard wrote:The little, 5#, piglets used in Spanish restaurants are simply not available here.
    So much for US mass production!-Richard

    Hi,

    During Soviet times, I could easily buy a piglet about 10 pounds or less to roast.

    I have tried to find the same here. After a lot of phone calls, I finally got someone who offered an explanation on why I cannot get a piglet any smaller than 25 pounds.

    When piglets are a few days old, they vaccinate them. Once vaccinated, they cannot be harvested until they reach at least 25 pounds.

    I inquired if they could raise a piglet to a smaller weight and forgo the vaccinating on this one piglet. They declined, because it could die meanwhile and they would lose money. I offered to buy the pig whether or not it died prematurely. I was declined again.

    It reminded me of the KennyZ's effort to get peach farmers to bring ripe peaches to the farmers markets. They did not wish to, because they would likely bruise and likely rejected by the buyer.

    I have cut my own tips when making St. Louis ribs. I have to admit, sometimes I like the rib tips more than the ribs, which is why boxed rib tips seem awfully attractive.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #23 - June 23rd, 2016, 2:33 pm
    Post #23 - June 23rd, 2016, 2:33 pm Post #23 - June 23rd, 2016, 2:33 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:I have cut my own tips when making St. Louis ribs. I have to admit, sometimes I like the rib tips more than the ribs, which is why boxed rib tips seem awfully attractive.

    Regards,


    If you don't need a whole box, and/or don't want them frozen, can't you buy them by the each at Peoria Packing?

    Also, I was recently in a store (90% sure it was Fresh Farms) that sold them in packs of 3 or 4 racks in the meat department.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #24 - June 24th, 2016, 7:01 am
    Post #24 - June 24th, 2016, 7:01 am Post #24 - June 24th, 2016, 7:01 am
    I did find one pig farmer near Fox Lake Wisconsin on whose farm I hunted that saved 6 piglets from vaccination and sold me one but the processor he used skinned that piglet and at around 15 #'s was not suitable for my desires. So I gave up!-Richard
  • Post #25 - June 24th, 2016, 7:02 am
    Post #25 - June 24th, 2016, 7:02 am Post #25 - June 24th, 2016, 7:02 am
    budrichard wrote:I did find one pig farmer near Fox Lake Wisconsin on whose farm I hunted that saved 6 piglets from vaccination and sold me one but the processor he used skinned that piglet and at around 15 #'s was not suitable for my small pig desires. So I gave up!-Richard

    BTW it did rotisserie quite nice anyway.
  • Post #26 - July 1st, 2016, 6:37 am
    Post #26 - July 1st, 2016, 6:37 am Post #26 - July 1st, 2016, 6:37 am
    jerryg wrote:I have been using "Aunt Bessies" rib tips for years and never been disapointed. Try Ultra foods for the 10 lb boxes.These are made up as slabs ,the only way to grill them.


    Aunt Bessie's Pork Rib Tips 10lb box on sale @ Tony's Finer foods in there weekly ad for $11.99 / 10lb box from 6/29/2016 - 7/5/2016.

    Tony's weekly circular for this week:
    https://tonysfreshmarket.com/weekly-circular
  • Post #27 - November 16th, 2018, 12:26 am
    Post #27 - November 16th, 2018, 12:26 am Post #27 - November 16th, 2018, 12:26 am
    Hi,

    I plan to smoke rib tips Friday for a program on Saturday.

    From reading here and there, I have seen smoking time range for 2-3 hours to 5 or so. What should I expect roughly?

    Presently, I plan to keep them whole until serving and cut them fresh. If there are advantages to cut them earlier, please advise. Just as important, what is the best way to reheat them on Saturday morning.

    Thank you!

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #28 - November 16th, 2018, 8:52 am
    Post #28 - November 16th, 2018, 8:52 am Post #28 - November 16th, 2018, 8:52 am
    Cathy2 wrote:I plan to smoke rib tips Friday for a program on Saturday.

    Proper size rolling papers are essential!

    2-hours is unrealistic. 5 +- ballpark. Tips are done when the tip of a knife is easily inserted into flesh between cartilage

    Leave whole to reheat, intact meat, be it ribs, tips or prime rib retains moisture better than cut.

    Start using your WSM more often, the more you use the fewer questions you will have.

    Reheat is basically the same as with the pork shoulder you recently asked about, though do not chop meat on a sheet pan or in bowl. ---> Link

    Here are a few pictures of my circa 2002 Custom Air Flow High Tech WSM for reference.
    ----->Link
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #29 - November 16th, 2018, 9:05 am
    Post #29 - November 16th, 2018, 9:05 am Post #29 - November 16th, 2018, 9:05 am
    G Wiv wrote:Proper size rolling papers are essential!

    2-hours is unrealistic. 5 +- ballpark. Tips are done when the tip of a knife is easily inserted into flesh between cartilage

    Leave whole to reheat, intact meat, be it ribs, tips or prime rib retains moisture better than cut.

    My feeling it was a 5+ hour cook. Earlier in this thread, someone did it far less time.

    G Wiv wrote:Start using your WSM more often, the more you use the fewer questions you will have.

    Since I always give you credit for teaching me how to make BBQ. It is far better I ask, then fail and still give you credit!

    As you well know, I have a friend who has a WSM stored in his garage without once being used. He has lots of questions and never quite pulls the plug. The challenge of being a perfectionist!

    Thank you!

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #30 - November 16th, 2018, 10:12 am
    Post #30 - November 16th, 2018, 10:12 am Post #30 - November 16th, 2018, 10:12 am
    Cathy2 wrote:I have a friend who has a WSM stored in his garage without once being used. He has lots of questions and never quite pulls the plug. The challenge of being a perfectionist!

    Not doing something one seemingly wishes to do over the course of a decade, where the worst that can happen is order-out pizza for dinner, is not a perfectionist. I'm not a Psychiatrist so I don't know what its actually called, but am fairly certain its not perfectionist.
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow

Contact

About

Team

Advertize

Close

Chat

Articles

Guide

Events

more