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Zier's Prime Meats - Wilmette - Dry-aged 21 days in-house

Zier's Prime Meats - Wilmette - Dry-aged 21 days in-house
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  • Post #31 - November 5th, 2007, 10:38 am
    Post #31 - November 5th, 2007, 10:38 am Post #31 - November 5th, 2007, 10:38 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Yesterday, I seasoned them up with a bit of kosher salt, some freshly-ground black pepper and a hearty sprinkling of G Wiv's excellent Chicago BBQ Rub (which is now available through The Spice House), then cooked them low and slow, over lump charcoal and some apple wood, at 275 F, for about 4 hours. The results were terrific . . .

    Image
    Beef ribs; rare, smokey and tender

    =R=


    Wait, 275 F for 4 Hours and they were rare??

    Jamie
  • Post #32 - November 5th, 2007, 11:07 am
    Post #32 - November 5th, 2007, 11:07 am Post #32 - November 5th, 2007, 11:07 am
    Jamieson22 wrote:Wait, 275 F for 4 Hours and they were rare??

    Yep. When I put them in the cooker, they were about 35 degrees F and I did have a few other things in there, too. I guess it may have been closer to 3.5 hours and I can't say that the temp was an exact 275 for the entire time but it was pretty close, as it dropped down a bit each time I opened the cooker to check them.

    =R=
    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #33 - November 5th, 2007, 3:39 pm
    Post #33 - November 5th, 2007, 3:39 pm Post #33 - November 5th, 2007, 3:39 pm
    mhill95149 wrote:Great looking shot there Ronnie!

    How much per pound for the Zier's aged prime NY strips?
    We had some age primes from Bryan Flannery in CA
    this weekend at $35.99 pp and while they were really good
    I'd love to try some local meat...
    Here's a shot of one of the steaks from this weekend

    Image

    That's some gorgeous stuff there, mhill. IIRC, Prime, dry-aged NY strips at Zier's are usually in the mid-$20's-per-pound range.

    =R=
    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #34 - November 6th, 2007, 12:04 pm
    Post #34 - November 6th, 2007, 12:04 pm Post #34 - November 6th, 2007, 12:04 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    Jamieson22 wrote:Wait, 275 F for 4 Hours and they were rare??

    Yep. When I put them in the cooker, they were about 35 degrees F and I did have a few other things in there, too. I guess it may have been closer to 3.5 hours and I can't say that the temp was an exact 275 for the entire time but it was pretty close, as it dropped down a bit each time I opened the cooker to check them.

    =R=


    Wow, guess that just seems to defy logic, and has me scratching my head as I can't imagine 3.5 hours @ 275 = Rare. May just have to hunt down some more beef ribs and "experiment" ;)
    Jamie
  • Post #35 - November 6th, 2007, 12:51 pm
    Post #35 - November 6th, 2007, 12:51 pm Post #35 - November 6th, 2007, 12:51 pm
    Jamieson22 wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    Jamieson22 wrote:Wait, 275 F for 4 Hours and they were rare??

    Yep. When I put them in the cooker, they were about 35 degrees F and I did have a few other things in there, too. I guess it may have been closer to 3.5 hours and I can't say that the temp was an exact 275 for the entire time but it was pretty close, as it dropped down a bit each time I opened the cooker to check them.

    =R=


    Wow, guess that just seems to defy logic, and has me scratching my head as I can't imagine 3.5 hours @ 275 = Rare. May just have to hunt down some more beef ribs and "experiment" ;)
    Jamie

    Well, as you know, BBQ is as much art as it is science. I didn't monitor things too closely. At 11:30 am, I put a bunch of meat on, including the beef ribs and ran the cooker as I always do. I checked things about every 30 minutes. After what was about 4 hours, I twisted one of the rib bones and it was moderately loose, so I took them off at that point. But again, I'm sure the temperature varied while I was cooking and I did have about 6-7 pounds of other meat on the cooker, so that probably played a part in things, too and may have slowed down the overall cooking process. The important thing is to get out there and cook! :)

    =R=
    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #36 - November 6th, 2007, 1:01 pm
    Post #36 - November 6th, 2007, 1:01 pm Post #36 - November 6th, 2007, 1:01 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Well, as you know, BBQ is as much art as it is science. I didn't monitor things too closely. At 11:30 am, I put a bunch of meat on, including the beef ribs and ran the cooker as I always do. I checked things about every 30 minutes. After what was about 4 hours, I twisted one of the rib bones and it was moderately loose, so I took them off at that point. But again, I'm sure the temperature varied while I was cooking and I did have about 6-7 pounds of other meat on the cooker, so that probably played a part in things, too and may have slowed down the overall cooking process. The important thing is to get out there and cook! :)

    =R=


    Oh yeah totally understand, and certainly not questioning your methods or abilities. Just more so curious. Were the beef ribs good served rare?
  • Post #37 - November 6th, 2007, 1:21 pm
    Post #37 - November 6th, 2007, 1:21 pm Post #37 - November 6th, 2007, 1:21 pm
    Jamieson22 wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Well, as you know, BBQ is as much art as it is science. I didn't monitor things too closely. At 11:30 am, I put a bunch of meat on, including the beef ribs and ran the cooker as I always do. I checked things about every 30 minutes. After what was about 4 hours, I twisted one of the rib bones and it was moderately loose, so I took them off at that point. But again, I'm sure the temperature varied while I was cooking and I did have about 6-7 pounds of other meat on the cooker, so that probably played a part in things, too and may have slowed down the overall cooking process. The important thing is to get out there and cook! :)

    =R=


    Oh yeah totally understand, and certainly not questioning your methods or abilities. Just more so curious. Were the beef ribs good served rare?

    Oh yeah. I would have never thought to even try them. But Dave Zier is familiar with my cooker and thought they'd turn out well. He was definitely right about it. I was very pleased. And thinking about it now, perhaps some of that red color in the finished meat could be attributed to the cooking process/smoke ring. I wish I'd taken more (and better) pics.

    =R=
    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #38 - November 6th, 2007, 1:31 pm
    Post #38 - November 6th, 2007, 1:31 pm Post #38 - November 6th, 2007, 1:31 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Oh yeah. I would have never thought to even try them. But Dave Zier is familiar with my cooker and thought they'd turn out well. He was definitely right about it. I was very pleased. And thinking about it now, perhaps some of that red color in the finished meat could be attributed to the cooking process/smoke ring. I wish I'd taken more (and better) pics.

    =R=


    Honestly those ribs look rare, not pink from a smoke ring. Could be that the photo is deceiving, but either way they are making me hungry.
    Jamie
  • Post #39 - November 6th, 2007, 2:16 pm
    Post #39 - November 6th, 2007, 2:16 pm Post #39 - November 6th, 2007, 2:16 pm
    Jamieson22 wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Oh yeah. I would have never thought to even try them. But Dave Zier is familiar with my cooker and thought they'd turn out well. He was definitely right about it. I was very pleased. And thinking about it now, perhaps some of that red color in the finished meat could be attributed to the cooking process/smoke ring. I wish I'd taken more (and better) pics.

    =R=


    Honestly those ribs look rare, not pink from a smoke ring. Could be that the photo is deceiving, but either way they are making me hungry.
    Jamie

    I do sometimes color-adjust photos, but on those, I didn't.

    =R=
    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #40 - November 6th, 2007, 6:54 pm
    Post #40 - November 6th, 2007, 6:54 pm Post #40 - November 6th, 2007, 6:54 pm
    Zier's looks like great market. In the city, the best meat I have found is in the back of a little grocery on Clark. It's the Apple Market. They have dry aged prime beef, and cut it to order. You walk in and you can see where they cut it up. They buy sides, hang them and cut them.

    It is just south of Fullerton, and just north of Belden on the east side of the road.
  • Post #41 - May 4th, 2008, 9:26 pm
    Post #41 - May 4th, 2008, 9:26 pm Post #41 - May 4th, 2008, 9:26 pm
    I made my weekly stop at Zier's on Friday and saw this beautiful meat in the case. Amazingly, this is not wagyu. It's standard dry-aged prime, if you can call such meat "standard." I normally prefer ribeyes but when the strips look like this, the ribeyes can wait . . .

    Image
    Dry-aged NY Strip from Zier's


    Image
    A closer look at the dry-aged NY Strip

    Tonight, I seasoned them up, hit them with a touch of oil and threw them on the Weber, over some lump charcoal . . .

    Image
    Charcoal-grilled NY Strip


    Image
    Interior shot of the smallest steak, after cooking to medium-rare


    Image
    The second steak, in a glamorous pose

    These steaks were juicy and really flavorful. Amazingly, those faint white streaks, which look like they might be sinew, are actually pockets of soft, delectably-marbled fat. I really love Zier's, as their quality is tremendously high and very consistent. And every once in a while -- like upon this visit -- there just happens to be a very special cow in the case. Since I normally hit Zier's on Thursdays, I'm happy to say that my procrastination this week clearly paid dividends. :wink:

    =R=
    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #42 - May 6th, 2008, 6:01 am
    Post #42 - May 6th, 2008, 6:01 am Post #42 - May 6th, 2008, 6:01 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:These steaks were juicy and really flavorful. Amazingly, those faint white streaks, which look like they might be sinew, are actually pockets of soft, delectably-marbled fat.

    Wowsers!

    I think your current .sig line says it all.

    "I have a culinary boner right now" - Andrew, Top Chef Chicago
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #43 - May 21st, 2008, 10:45 pm
    Post #43 - May 21st, 2008, 10:45 pm Post #43 - May 21st, 2008, 10:45 pm
    Dave Zier continues his media barnstorming. He was on channel 7 this past Monday with some grilling tips and, as usual, he did a really nice job:

    Grilling tips, recipe from Zier's Prime Meats and Poultry Inc.

    =R=
    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #44 - November 15th, 2008, 6:16 pm
    Post #44 - November 15th, 2008, 6:16 pm Post #44 - November 15th, 2008, 6:16 pm
    I stopped by Zier's today for my weekly visit and Dave was getting ready for yet another tv appearance -- this one will be tomorrow morning -- on Channel 5 (WMAQ TV) at 9 am CT, where he'll be discussing Thanksgiving cookery. Today, though, he was prepping a bit of food for the segment on his Komodo Kamado cooker . . .

    Image
    Dave Zier takes a goose off the cooker


    Image
    Dave and his cohort John, who seemed very excited about the goose


    Image
    Turkey Breast

    It was like an old cartoon because the entrancing aromas wafting out from the cooker were virtually pulling unassuming walkers-by into the shop. Several of them even asked if the birds were for sale. It was hard to stand there and not tear off a drumstick but I restrained myself. :wink:

    =R=
    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #45 - November 15th, 2008, 7:14 pm
    Post #45 - November 15th, 2008, 7:14 pm Post #45 - November 15th, 2008, 7:14 pm
    Ronnie (or Dave, I suppose) does Zier's carry goose during the holidays? I have some friends I'll send his way if so.
  • Post #46 - December 24th, 2008, 2:35 pm
    Post #46 - December 24th, 2008, 2:35 pm Post #46 - December 24th, 2008, 2:35 pm
    Mhays, it's probably too late now but Zier's does carry goose. He normally has frozen and can get fresh also, as a special order.

    I picked up my dry-aged, Prime rib roast from Zier's yesterday and will cook it tomorrow for my family for Christmas dinner. This is a 7-bone roast that Dave Zier was kind enough to roll for me (the bones are partially separated and tied back on). Dave told me that he began aging these on 12/3, so that's just about 3 weeks . . .

    Image


    Image


    Image


    Image

    Merry Christmas, everyone! :)

    =R=
    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #47 - December 24th, 2008, 2:39 pm
    Post #47 - December 24th, 2008, 2:39 pm Post #47 - December 24th, 2008, 2:39 pm
    Man, does that roast look good! I was at Zier's today to pick up a couple of turkeys and a ham for tomorrow. I know I won't be dissapointed.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #48 - December 24th, 2008, 3:30 pm
    Post #48 - December 24th, 2008, 3:30 pm Post #48 - December 24th, 2008, 3:30 pm
    That's an incredible looking roast, ronnie! I know that you'll do it justice.

    Want a hint as to your holiday gift to LTHForum this year? Just promise us that you'll charge your camera batteries tonight.

    Coming from someone 7 hours ahead of Chicago and in a country that celebrates Christmas on Christmas Eve, Happy holidays, everyone.
  • Post #49 - December 24th, 2008, 5:02 pm
    Post #49 - December 24th, 2008, 5:02 pm Post #49 - December 24th, 2008, 5:02 pm
    Ron,

    The chine bone on your 7-bone rib roast appears to be blue. So happens I have thoroughly researched this dangerous phenomenon, which is a subset of Farfalonious of the Blowhole, and will, at no charge due to my incredible holiday spirit, provide proper bio hazard correct disposal.

    If I'm not home when you drop off the rib roast please go in the backyard and set it right on the WSM. :)

    You're welcome.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #50 - December 24th, 2008, 5:53 pm
    Post #50 - December 24th, 2008, 5:53 pm Post #50 - December 24th, 2008, 5:53 pm
    Food porn at its absolute best-----
    "Goldie, how many times have I told you guys that I don't want no horsin' around on the airplane?"
  • Post #51 - December 24th, 2008, 11:08 pm
    Post #51 - December 24th, 2008, 11:08 pm Post #51 - December 24th, 2008, 11:08 pm
    Thanks for the answer, Ronnie - I'll let my friend know for future reference. Lovely fatty hunk of muscle, there. I'm surprised, however, that there are only two holiday raw meat photos this year...
  • Post #52 - December 25th, 2008, 2:15 am
    Post #52 - December 25th, 2008, 2:15 am Post #52 - December 25th, 2008, 2:15 am
    Coming from someone 7 hours ahead of Chicago and in a country that celebrates Christmas on Christmas Eve, Happy holidays, everyone.


    God Jul, Bridgestone! :D
  • Post #53 - December 25th, 2008, 12:21 pm
    Post #53 - December 25th, 2008, 12:21 pm Post #53 - December 25th, 2008, 12:21 pm
    Ditto, Bridgestone!

    Quick question - does anybody have a time range for the low-roast then sear method? I've got a 9-lb roast and am trying to figure out when to cook everything else, since it's the only thing I'll be cooking at 250. I've looked all over the interenet and gotten from between 15-30 minutes per lb, which is a BIG differential. Anybody experienced with this method care to chime in?
  • Post #54 - December 25th, 2008, 12:30 pm
    Post #54 - December 25th, 2008, 12:30 pm Post #54 - December 25th, 2008, 12:30 pm
    Mhays wrote:Ditto, Bridgestone!

    Quick question - does anybody have a time range for the low-roast then sear method? I've got a 9-lb roast and am trying to figure out when to cook everything else, since it's the only thing I'll be cooking at 250. I've looked all over the interenet and gotten from between 15-30 minutes per lb, which is a BIG differential. Anybody experienced with this method care to chime in?



    When I did this, I found Alton Brown's time estimations to be right on the money (sorry, no time to look them up for you right now), although you may think the roast is not cooking at all until close to the end. When using this method you must have faith, Grasshopper.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #55 - December 25th, 2008, 1:57 pm
    Post #55 - December 25th, 2008, 1:57 pm Post #55 - December 25th, 2008, 1:57 pm
    Thanks, steve - and I also finally found the thread where I asked that question last year...
  • Post #56 - December 26th, 2008, 12:40 am
    Post #56 - December 26th, 2008, 12:40 am Post #56 - December 26th, 2008, 12:40 am
    It was well-worth it but my monster roast took a long time to cook. In fact, it took several hours for it to even come to room temperature. I anticipated this and actually moved it from the garage to the kitchen before I went to bed on Christmas eve. Christmas morning, about 6.5 hours later, I put the still-somewhat-cold roast in the oven (pre-heated to 250 and turned down to 200 after the roast is placed). This was at about 9:30 am. By 4:45 pm, it had reached 128 F. But, since I'd called dinner for 4 pm, I had to hurry things a bit and turned the oven up to 225 for about the last hour of the cook. The results were excellent but the cap got a little browner than I wish it had. Still, that was fine because the fattiness kept it from drying out in the least . . .


    Image


    Image


    Image


    Image
    Was it wrong of me to not serve these ribs to the group? :wink:

    I hope everyone had a fantastic Christmas. In our household, we still have 3 nights of Hanukkah left, too. Oy! :)

    =R=
    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #57 - December 26th, 2008, 3:26 am
    Post #57 - December 26th, 2008, 3:26 am Post #57 - December 26th, 2008, 3:26 am
    Fantastic, ronnie! That roast was/is a work of art.

    Thank you.
  • Post #58 - December 26th, 2008, 7:52 am
    Post #58 - December 26th, 2008, 7:52 am Post #58 - December 26th, 2008, 7:52 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Was it wrong of me to not serve these ribs to the group? :wink

    Ron,

    Not in the least, cooks treat, and what a treat they look.

    Rib roast looks, and I am sure tasted, terrific!

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #59 - December 26th, 2008, 8:36 am
    Post #59 - December 26th, 2008, 8:36 am Post #59 - December 26th, 2008, 8:36 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Was it wrong of me to not serve these ribs to the group? :wink:


    To paraphrase, let them eat cake! That is a beautiful looking roast.

    P.S. What time should I be over for some beef ribs?
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #60 - December 26th, 2008, 8:58 am
    Post #60 - December 26th, 2008, 8:58 am Post #60 - December 26th, 2008, 8:58 am
    Ronnie,

    I love it that your idea of an easy day of light cooking is something that 99% of the population wouldn't attempt to cook in a million years.

    Beautiful stuff.

    Best,
    Michael

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