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You Too Can Master Fried Chicken The LTHForum Way!

You Too Can Master Fried Chicken The LTHForum Way!
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  • Post #31 - September 6th, 2007, 2:02 pm
    Post #31 - September 6th, 2007, 2:02 pm Post #31 - September 6th, 2007, 2:02 pm
    MAG wrote:And now I get to extol the virtues of what some may suggest to be a useless kitchen gadget: the laser thermometer. I love this for deep frying, for candy making, for bread baking (monitoring the water temperature) and even for checking oven temperatures in unfamiliar ovens. For deep frying, you can easily monitor the temperature of the oil without having to worry obout a deep fry thermometer flipping up and splattering oil.

    I've been curious about these for some time. How long have you had it? And how accurate do you believe it is? Which brand do you have and are you familiar with others? Does it measure the temperature simply at the surface?
  • Post #32 - October 27th, 2007, 9:49 pm
    Post #32 - October 27th, 2007, 9:49 pm Post #32 - October 27th, 2007, 9:49 pm
    Hi,

    There are four great fried chicken recipes presently available on the Atlanta Constitution website. There is a recipe from Scott Peacock's Watershed restaurant, Austen Leslie's, Mary Mac Tearoom et al.

    ***

    According to Shirley Corriher, a crispier crust can be had with chicken if low protein flour, like White Lily is used. Scott Peacock's use of corn starch as part of the chicken coating is an effort to achieve the same crisp effect.

    ***

    I learned the term 'fried chicken' can be slang for intercourse, ie: "They been dating for months and finally fried chicken!" I wasn't alone in not knowing this, then heard fried chicken in this context twice in 2 days.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #33 - October 29th, 2007, 2:19 pm
    Post #33 - October 29th, 2007, 2:19 pm Post #33 - October 29th, 2007, 2:19 pm
    Has anypne tried a le crueset dutch oven instead of a skillet? While I love my skillet (12 years old, from Wal-Mart, and looks better than the day I bought it for $7) fried chicken may get messy. I am thinking the high sides would help keep the splatter down and the darn thing is cast iron inside.
    I'm not Angry, I'm hungry.
  • Post #34 - October 29th, 2007, 2:59 pm
    Post #34 - October 29th, 2007, 2:59 pm Post #34 - October 29th, 2007, 2:59 pm
    With such high sides as there are to be found in most dutch ovens, you run the risk of steaming, which would lessen your chances of a good crust.
    "Who says I despair?...I like to eat crawfish and drink beer. That's despair?"--Walker Percy
  • Post #35 - October 30th, 2007, 6:31 am
    Post #35 - October 30th, 2007, 6:31 am Post #35 - October 30th, 2007, 6:31 am
    AngrySarah wrote:Has anypne tried a le crueset dutch oven instead of a skillet? While I love my skillet (12 years old, from Wal-Mart, and looks better than the day I bought it for $7) fried chicken may get messy. I am thinking the high sides would help keep the splatter down and the darn thing is cast iron inside.


    I use a splatter screen. It's handy. It doesn't eliminate the mess, but cuts down on it significantly. It's cheap, too. I think you could fine these just about anywhere that sells kitchen wares.

    http://www.amazon.com/Progressive-Splat ... B0000X0X3Q
  • Post #36 - October 30th, 2007, 6:57 am
    Post #36 - October 30th, 2007, 6:57 am Post #36 - October 30th, 2007, 6:57 am
    Cathy2 wrote:There are four great fried chicken recipes presently available on the Atlanta Constitution website. There is a recipe from Scott Peacock's Watershed restaurant, Austen Leslie's, Mary Mac Tearoom et al.

    C2,

    I've made two of the four recipes, Austin Leslie's and Scott Peacock's, to great effect. I'm looking forward to trying the other two recipes, Son's Place and Mary Mac's. Thanks for posting the link.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #37 - November 1st, 2007, 5:56 am
    Post #37 - November 1st, 2007, 5:56 am Post #37 - November 1st, 2007, 5:56 am
    AngrySarah wrote:Has anypne tried a le crueset dutch oven instead of a skillet? While I love my skillet (12 years old, from Wal-Mart, and looks better than the day I bought it for $7) fried chicken may get messy. I am thinking the high sides would help keep the splatter down and the darn thing is cast iron inside.

    While I prefer the cast iron pan, I really don't think you'll have a steaming issue with the Dutch oven. You should end up with a very nice crispy crust, and the Dutch oven conducts heat so well. Just make sure to use a minimal amount of oil -- about 1/4 inch
  • Post #38 - November 14th, 2007, 12:04 pm
    Post #38 - November 14th, 2007, 12:04 pm Post #38 - November 14th, 2007, 12:04 pm
    BR wrote:
    MAG wrote:And now I get to extol the virtues of what some may suggest to be a useless kitchen gadget: the laser thermometer. I love this for deep frying, for candy making, for bread baking (monitoring the water temperature) and even for checking oven temperatures in unfamiliar ovens. For deep frying, you can easily monitor the temperature of the oil without having to worry obout a deep fry thermometer flipping up and splattering oil.

    I've been curious about these for some time. How long have you had it? And how accurate do you believe it is? Which brand do you have and are you familiar with others? Does it measure the temperature simply at the surface?


    This is probably as good a thread as any for this; a combination of annoyance with my candy thermometer, wanting to take multiple readings to monitor water-bath temps and a seemingly good deal prompted me to get a noncontact thermometer. I got it today and for $30 (+ shipping) it's great. The accuracy is rated at ± 2 ºC and that or better is what I observe (I tested on various surfaces I know the temperatures independently, in the -20 to 120 ºC range). This model doesn't have a laser, but measuring even from 3 ft. away I think I can point fairly accurately. This would measure surface temperatures - (see here)
  • Post #39 - November 16th, 2007, 11:18 am
    Post #39 - November 16th, 2007, 11:18 am Post #39 - November 16th, 2007, 11:18 am
    Fried chicken made easy
  • Post #40 - November 16th, 2007, 11:37 am
    Post #40 - November 16th, 2007, 11:37 am Post #40 - November 16th, 2007, 11:37 am
    JSM wrote:Fried chicken made easy


    And its cousin Mild Sauce, Fried Hard
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #41 - November 26th, 2007, 10:39 pm
    Post #41 - November 26th, 2007, 10:39 pm Post #41 - November 26th, 2007, 10:39 pm
    LTH,

    On their recent journey to Middle Tennessee Pigmon, m'th'su, ReneG and Trixie-Pea made a side trip to hot chicken landmark Prince's in Nashville, which is mentioned in John T Edge's book Fried Chicken. Prince's has long been on my culinary to-do list so when Trixie mentioned she had reverse engineered the recipe I was all ears, tongs and bubbling oil.

    Prince's Fried Chicken
    Recipe interpretation by Kristina Meyer

    Dry rub/marinade Kosher salt, black pepper, white pepper, onion and garlic powder, jalapeno, habanero and cayenne.

    Brine Buttermilk, hot sauce in equal proportions.

    Dredging flour same spices as above
    Image

    Deep Fry Heat chilies in oil, remove before frying
    Image

    Finish with a generous dusting of the same spices as above with the addition of turbinado sugar.
    Image

    Pickle coin for decoration.
    Image
    Image

    For a first go it came out quite well, but, believe it or not, I thought it needed to be hotter. After consulting with Trix, I'm going to triple the amount of cayenne in the flour, along with paprika for additional color, and triple the amount of habanero in the sprinkle of rub as it comes out of the fryer fat.

    Additional pictures may be found here

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #42 - November 27th, 2007, 12:23 am
    Post #42 - November 27th, 2007, 12:23 am Post #42 - November 27th, 2007, 12:23 am
    That looks really good, right down to the all-important impaled pickle coins. At Prince's the chicken is served on a white bread grease sopper which becomes stained dark orange by the end.

    If there was any doubt it wasn't hot enough, you're probably still a few notches below Prince's "medium." As Bill Purcell, hot chicken fan and Mayor of Nashville, said, "I eat hot chicken because it is Prince's Hot Chicken Shack. If you want something different, you should go to a medium chicken shack, though they do not exist because nobody wants that." The quote is from a nice Sun-Times article on Prince's by Dave Hoekstra.
  • Post #43 - November 27th, 2007, 12:25 am
    Post #43 - November 27th, 2007, 12:25 am Post #43 - November 27th, 2007, 12:25 am
    Nice comments and procedural. Can we get the complete recipe, including timing (how long in the brine, order of operations on the rub and/or marinade)?
  • Post #44 - November 27th, 2007, 8:06 am
    Post #44 - November 27th, 2007, 8:06 am Post #44 - November 27th, 2007, 8:06 am
    Santander wrote:Nice comments and procedural. Can we get the complete recipe, including timing (how long in the brine, order of operations on the rub and/or marinade)?

    Matt,

    Prince's Fried Chicken order of operations:

    1) Apply dry rub to chicken, refrigerate 3-hours to overnight. (I went about 4-hours)
    2) Immerse chicken in buttermilk/hot sauce mix, refrigerate 4-hours to overnight. (I went about 4-hours)
    3) Season oil with dry whole chili pepper. Start from cold oil, when oil comes to temp remove. The idea is to flavor the oil, without burning the chilies.
    4) Season flour generously with spice mix. (Next time I will add hot paprika and triple the amount of cayenne.
    5) Dredge chicken in flour mixture
    6) Deep fry until golden
    7) Sprinkle spice mix, with the addition of brown or turbinado sugar. (Next time I will triple the amount of habanero powder.)
    8 ) Spear pickle coin with toothpick for decoration
    9) Eat, enjoy, don't touch your eyes.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #45 - December 3rd, 2007, 8:29 am
    Post #45 - December 3rd, 2007, 8:29 am Post #45 - December 3rd, 2007, 8:29 am
    G Wiv wrote:Prince's Fried Chicken order of operations:

    Second go on Prince Fried Chicken and I increased each stage and spice in quest of mouth burning, eye watering, curse the cook fried chicken.

    While the chicken was noticeably hotter, the opinion of those who had recently eaten Prince's Fried Chicken in Nashville said it was mild in comparison. I'm starting to think Prince's uses a few drops of pure capsaicin, which is 10-million plus on the Scoville scale.

    Inferno hot or not, the chicken was tasty.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #46 - February 8th, 2010, 10:00 pm
    Post #46 - February 8th, 2010, 10:00 pm Post #46 - February 8th, 2010, 10:00 pm
    For the Super Bowl, I tried a new trick (new for me at least) for extra crispy fried chicken: I added about 1.5 teaspoons of baking powder to the flour mixture. The baking powder definitely resulted in the most crispy fried chicken I have ever made. It was nice to try, but I actually prefer it slightly less crispy so while I might use baking powder again, I'll reduce the amount I use.

    But the breading, combined with my usual salt water brine followed with a brine in buttermilk (with a little hot sauce added) resulted in very tasty, moist and ultra-crispy fried chicken which was a big hit with my friends. Here are some pics of the raw chicken resting and the finished product (with two Lodge cast iron pans going at the same time, I got a little busy and forgot to take pictures while frying, but I used about 1/4 inch deep peanut oil for frying.

    Image


    Image


    Image


    Image


    And nothing goes better with fried chicken than buttermilk biscuits (recipe courtesy of Art Smith):

    Image

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