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The Romance of Canning

The Romance of Canning
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  • Post #421 - September 2nd, 2013, 7:34 pm
    Post #421 - September 2nd, 2013, 7:34 pm Post #421 - September 2nd, 2013, 7:34 pm
    leek wrote:
    Today we stemmed and washed them, separated the skins from the pulp and pureed them with some sugar, cooked, used a food mill to remove the seeds, cooked more (with sugar and lemon juice), water bath canned them, and 4.5 hours from start to finish I have 7 one-cup jars of jam! I have heard 5 pops so far... (not sure how to embed from Instagram) http://instagram.com/p/dxhcpwDlzw/


    Where did you get your cute jars?
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #422 - September 3rd, 2013, 2:54 pm
    Post #422 - September 3rd, 2013, 2:54 pm Post #422 - September 3rd, 2013, 2:54 pm
    pairs4life wrote:


    Where did you get your cute jars?


    I hate to say I don't remember :( I got them last year or maybe the year before. They have the old non-BPA-free seals.

    I tend not to stray far, so it was most likely one of the following:
    Menard's (Clybourn near Costco)
    Strack and Van Til (on Elston)
    Ace Hardware (Lincoln just S. of Irving Park)
    Leek

    SAVING ONE DOG may not change the world,
    but it CHANGES THE WORLD for that one dog.
    American Brittany Rescue always needs foster homes. Please think about helping that one dog. http://www.americanbrittanyrescue.org
  • Post #423 - October 7th, 2013, 10:12 pm
    Post #423 - October 7th, 2013, 10:12 pm Post #423 - October 7th, 2013, 10:12 pm
    Live Pressure Canning class: Green Beans, October 10 at 3 pm EST at this link:
    http://ball.yourbrandlive.com/c/greenbeans/
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #424 - June 3rd, 2015, 8:50 pm
    Post #424 - June 3rd, 2015, 8:50 pm Post #424 - June 3rd, 2015, 8:50 pm
    Hi,

    I make pickled corn, because my Mom likes it. I finally found a use for pickled corn, where I will more eagerly commit to making it in the future. I made a salad with half a pint jar today: I drained the liquid into a serving bowl, then added some olive oil and whisked it together. I tossed in the pickled corn. I thinly sliced red onion and some green shoot from red onions who had gone into reproduction. I cleaned radishes, sliced them lengthwise and cut them into thin half-moons. If I had parsley, I would have added some. I considered adding cucumber, but left it for another use.

    This was definitely the favorite salad of the evening. I liked it enough to put pickled corn on the canning to-do list this year.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #425 - June 4th, 2015, 12:39 am
    Post #425 - June 4th, 2015, 12:39 am Post #425 - June 4th, 2015, 12:39 am
    I like chow-chow where corn is the primary. Great on sandwiches, salads, tacos, and chili.
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #426 - August 8th, 2016, 7:15 pm
    Post #426 - August 8th, 2016, 7:15 pm Post #426 - August 8th, 2016, 7:15 pm
    I am salting zucchini for British, Bread, and butter pickles but since I am going to use pasturization AND have a day job + like to sleep at night I am curious as to the deleterious effect of holding the salted vegetables for a longer period of time, say overnight.

    Thoughts?
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #427 - August 9th, 2016, 10:19 am
    Post #427 - August 9th, 2016, 10:19 am Post #427 - August 9th, 2016, 10:19 am
    Hi,

    I have done this. I kept them in the refrigerator and put some ice on top. If you kept them in fridge, that will be enough.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #428 - August 9th, 2016, 3:13 pm
    Post #428 - August 9th, 2016, 3:13 pm Post #428 - August 9th, 2016, 3:13 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:Hi,

    I have done this. I kept them in the refrigerator and put some ice on top. If you kept them in fridge, that will be enough.

    Regards,



    Thank you!
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #429 - September 13th, 2016, 2:02 pm
    Post #429 - September 13th, 2016, 2:02 pm Post #429 - September 13th, 2016, 2:02 pm
    Can I ask you another quick canning question?

    I have read online that canning jars, lids, and rims can be sterilized by being washed in a dishwasher using the hot dry setting. However, info on the the National Center for Home Food Preservation gives me the impression that this is fine for cleaning but does not eliminate the need for sterilizing in boiling water. Burning Issue: Pre-Sterilizing Jars before Canning
    Would you agree that sterilizing by boiling is still necessary after dishwashing and hot drying?


    Part of your answer is in your link Burning Issue: Pre-Sterilizing Jars before Canning:

    So, in summary: Is a 5-minute process time enough to sterilize jars? No. If you are using a process time of only 5 minutes, such as for some jellied or pickled products, then you need to pre-sterilize jars before filling them (or increase the process time to 10 minutes). If a process time is 10 minutes or more then will the jars be sterilized? Yes, but be sure to wash and rinse them well, and keep warm, before filling them with food.

    You will always need to wash your jars before use. Once done, you place them jar-mouth-side down on a clean towel. This prevents spores in the air to get into them.

    Note: I hand wash my jars from storage. They are washed initially in the dishwasher before going into storage. Always stored mouth-side down to prevent anything from getting in.

    ***

    If you are making a jelly or jam with a processing time of less than 10 minutes, you need to sterilize your jars.

    To avoid sterilizing, I process jams and jelly for 10 minutes.

    Hammond and I went to Muncie, Indiana some years ago to visit Jarden (formerly Altrista) who produces Ball Jars. This is where I first saw jars being preheated. They heat jars to about 140 degrees to reduce thermal shock and jar breakage.

    They take the jar, fill it, remove bubbles, clean the jar edge and place a flat followed by the ring.

    Always read the label on how to prepare the flats. Over time the instructions have changed. If you don't and use the wrong method, you risk having a bad seal.

    ***

    I do avoid placing hot onto cold or cold into hot; contents or surface.

    When I have heavily canned, I may lose a jar a year to thermal shock.

    If I am fresh packing tomatoes into a jar, I don't bother with pre-warming the jar. It will cool down quickly from the contents. I won't put the jar in water hotter than 140 degrees.

    If I am putting in very hot sauce, I am more inclined to preheat the jar. I will place it into a canner heated to 140 degrees. I do this one jar at a time, not all jars pulled or replaced all at once.

    I hope this all makes sense.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #430 - September 13th, 2016, 2:05 pm
    Post #430 - September 13th, 2016, 2:05 pm Post #430 - September 13th, 2016, 2:05 pm
    Thanks very much, Cathy! That mostly makes sense. I gather that if I washed and hot-dried the lids in the dishwasher right before I was ready to can, kept the dishwasher unopened until the last minute so they stayed warm and unexposed to spores in the air, and then filled them and hot-water processed them for at least 10 minutes, I could skip a separate intermediate sterilization-by-boiling step. Hope I understood that correctly.
    "I would gladly pay you Tuesday for a hamburger today."
  • Post #431 - September 13th, 2016, 2:47 pm
    Post #431 - September 13th, 2016, 2:47 pm Post #431 - September 13th, 2016, 2:47 pm
    Katie wrote:I gather that if I washed and hot-dried the lids in the dishwasher right before I was ready to can, kept the dishwasher unopened until the last minute so they stayed warm and unexposed to spores in the air, and then filled them and hot-water processed them for at least 10 minutes


    Lids or rings? I think you mean the rings. The flats don't need to be in the dishwasher.

    Katie wrote:I could skip a separate intermediate sterilization-by-boiling step.

    This is not intended for sterilization. It is intended for reduction of thermal shock. You don't want a temperature higher than 140 degrees.

    Regards,
    CAthy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #432 - September 13th, 2016, 3:07 pm
    Post #432 - September 13th, 2016, 3:07 pm Post #432 - September 13th, 2016, 3:07 pm
    So I guess that means I did not understand after all, which does not surprise me. I will read your instructions and the site's instructions again more carefully when I'm getting ready to launch a canning project.
    "I would gladly pay you Tuesday for a hamburger today."

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