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Swedish cooking index
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    Post #1 - January 18th, 2008, 4:17 am
    Post #1 - January 18th, 2008, 4:17 am Post #1 - January 18th, 2008, 4:17 am
    Please forgive any pretentions but I’ve had a few requests to make an index for all of my Swedish food pictorials. Here it is. I’ve made a few other (re: non-Swedish) dish posts but am keeping this list as Swedish as possible.

    Looking through many of these old post, I can’t help but notice all of the kind comments I’ve received. Thank you! Making these has been a lot of fun and I hope to keep adding to this collection.

    Sincerely,

    Jonathan K (aka “Bridgestone”)

    Suovas (Stew made from smoked reindeer): viewtopic.php?f=16&t=22756

    Swedish-style filled buns: viewtopic.php?p=220719#p220719

    Hallongrottor ("Raspberry jam-filled shortbreads"): viewtopic.php?t=19261

    Kalmarlåda ("Lamb chops with ham and southern-style potatoes"): viewtopic.php?t=18431

    Raggmunk ("Swedish-style potato pancakes"): viewtopic.php?t=18194

    Stuvad lake ("Burbot with cream sauce"): viewtopic.php?t=18081

    Swedish semlor: viewtopic.php?t=17679

    Laxpudding ("Salmon strata"): viewtopic.php?t=17575

    Biff Rydberg (”Beef tenderloin hash”): viewtopic.php?t=8962

    Ostkaka (”Savory cheesecake”): viewtopic.php?t=8974

    Stekt strömming (”Pan-fried herring”): viewtopic.php?t=8995

    Fläsklägg med rotmos (”Boiled pork knuckle”): viewtopic.php?t=9019

    Crayfish, Swedish-style: viewtopic.php?t=9540

    Swedish-style cinnamon buns: viewtopic.php?t=12043

    Dillkött (”Dill-flavored veal stew”): viewtopic.php?t=12619

    Kroppkakor (”Potato dumplings”): viewtopic.php?t=12650

    More herring (pickled and smoked): viewtopic.php?t=12699

    Kåldomar (”Cabbage rolls”): viewtopic.php?t=12719

    Biff á la Lindström (”Pan-fried beef patties”): viewtopic.php?t=13001

    Blodpudding (”Baked blood loaf”): viewtopic.php?t=13033

    Turbot & Mackeral: viewtopic.php?t=13600

    Gubbröra (”Herring salad”): viewtopic.php?t=12600

    Kalops (”Beef stew”): viewtopic.php?t=15040

    Bilberries: viewtopic.php?t=15143

    Hökarpanna (”Pork and kidney stew”): viewtopic.php?t=15338

    Moose sirloin/Skomakarlåda: viewtopic.php?t=15598

    St. Johns wort snaps: viewtopic.php?p=146235#146235

    Fiskgratäng (“Scalloped fish”): viewtopic.php?t=17274
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Julbord, 2006: viewtopic.php?t=11513

    Julbord, 2007 (preparations):

    Swedish-style Christmas meatballs: viewtopic.php?t=16901

    Lussebullar (”Saffron buns”): viewtopic.php?p=168338#168338

    Christmas leverpastej (“Liver pate”): viewtopic.php?t=16856

    Glögg: viewtopic.php?p=166027#166027
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Swedish sausages: viewtopic.php?t=15371

    Swedish dry-aged beef: viewtopic.php?t=8760
    Last edited by Bridgestone on February 4th, 2009, 5:15 am, edited 8 times in total.
  • Post #2 - January 18th, 2008, 8:48 am
    Post #2 - January 18th, 2008, 8:48 am Post #2 - January 18th, 2008, 8:48 am
    Bridgestone, this is awesome! Thanks - that must have been quite a bit of work!
  • Post #3 - January 18th, 2008, 1:21 pm
    Post #3 - January 18th, 2008, 1:21 pm Post #3 - January 18th, 2008, 1:21 pm
    Thank you, Bridgestone. This will make for good midnight fantasy reading as I contemplate my next trip to Sweden - or Andersonville. I so appreciate your careful documentation and beautiful pictures!
    Man : I can't understand how a poet like you can eat that stuff.
    T. S. Eliot: Ah, but you're not a poet.
  • Post #4 - January 22nd, 2008, 12:15 am
    Post #4 - January 22nd, 2008, 12:15 am Post #4 - January 22nd, 2008, 12:15 am
    Jonathan, for some time now, I've admired your recipes and accompanying pix, and it's excellent having them all consolidated in one location for easy reference. Now, maybe I'll actually make one of them myself. :D

    Thanks.

    David
    “We all have to stand before the kitchen gods.” Chef Jacob Sahaya Kumar Aruni
  • Post #5 - June 24th, 2008, 10:17 am
    Post #5 - June 24th, 2008, 10:17 am Post #5 - June 24th, 2008, 10:17 am
    Bridgestone, I'd been meaning to mention - you'll be happy to know that your fellow LTHers did you proud at the potluck: both GWiv's version of Laxpudding and Ronnie Suburban's version of your Swedish Meatballs were excellent, a testament to this index.

    Thanks again, all three of you, from the bottom of my stomach!
  • Post #6 - July 1st, 2008, 12:09 pm
    Post #6 - July 1st, 2008, 12:09 pm Post #6 - July 1st, 2008, 12:09 pm
    My beets are starting to come in, and I'd meant to mention - Bridgestone, do you pickle your own beets, or purchase them? I notice that they feature prominently in much of your cooking. If your own, could you add the recipe?
  • Post #7 - July 3rd, 2008, 2:25 am
    Post #7 - July 3rd, 2008, 2:25 am Post #7 - July 3rd, 2008, 2:25 am
    Wonderful suggestion, Mhays!

    I've only planted "polka" beets this year (white and red striped). And, while they are ready to be picked, they are so sweet that it would be a shame to pickle them.

    However, I'll keep my eyes peeled at the store and keep your request/suggestion in mind!
  • Post #8 - August 4th, 2008, 7:27 pm
    Post #8 - August 4th, 2008, 7:27 pm Post #8 - August 4th, 2008, 7:27 pm
    Bridgestone,

    I am a rabid fan of your posts. Your mise is always so lovely, and I love all the process shots. Fantastic stuff.
  • Post #9 - March 5th, 2009, 5:52 am
    Post #9 - March 5th, 2009, 5:52 am Post #9 - March 5th, 2009, 5:52 am
    Great i like your pickled and smoked very much thanx for the recipe. Can we make this recipe with any fish type.
    Many of the great achievements of the world were accomplished by tired and discouraged men who kept on working
  • Post #10 - March 5th, 2009, 8:28 am
    Post #10 - March 5th, 2009, 8:28 am Post #10 - March 5th, 2009, 8:28 am
    Hi and thanks, clair909!

    This particular type of preparation (fried and pickled) is really only done with herring here in Sweden. They are still cheap, tasty and readily available so there's not much incentive to experiment.

    I have seen a few recipies for pickled salmon, though. So, using the brine I showed, you could simply brine raw cubes or slices of salmon. I suppose you could also try frying slices first and then pickling those.

    Good luck and thanks for the question! It's always nice to see that someone has used the index.
  • Post #11 - March 9th, 2009, 12:20 am
    Post #11 - March 9th, 2009, 12:20 am Post #11 - March 9th, 2009, 12:20 am
    Bridgestone wrote:Hi and thanks, clair909!

    This particular type of preparation (fried and pickled) is really only done with herring here in Sweden. They are still cheap, tasty and readily available so there's not much incentive to experiment.

    I have seen a few recipies for pickled salmon, though. So, using the brine I showed, you could simply brine raw cubes or slices of salmon. I suppose you could also try frying slices first and then pickling those.

    Good luck and thanks for the question! It's always nice to see that someone has used the index.


    Thanx you have explained everything so nicely.
    I very very grateful to you.
    Many of the great achievements of the world were accomplished by tired and discouraged men who kept on working
  • Post #12 - December 20th, 2009, 12:29 am
    Post #12 - December 20th, 2009, 12:29 am Post #12 - December 20th, 2009, 12:29 am
    Hi,

    While waiting for pots to boil, I was reading Repast, Quarterly Publication of the Culinary Historians of Ann Arbor. Their Fall 2009 issue discusses Finnish- and Scandinavian-American traditions of food and hospitality.

    An article on Swedish Coffee and Seven Kinds of Cookies by Kerstin Trowbridge referenced several good sources for Swedish recipes:

    Swedish Cakes and Cookies*, translated by Melody Favish;

    The Great Scandinavian Baking Book by Beatrice A. Ojakangas (of Minnesota); and

    Favorite Recipes by the Swedish American Heritage Society of West Michigan (http://www.sahswm.org).

    *Swedish Cakes and Cookies is known as Sju sorters kakor (Seven Kinds of Cookies). At Swedish coffee parties, guests were initially offered a filling coffee bread, followed by a sponge cake, cookies and finally a special torte. The hostess often served seven kinds of cookies in addition to other sweets.

    Sju sorters kakor has sold over 3.5 million copies over several editions since the original in 1945. It is Sweden's most popular cookbook.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #13 - December 20th, 2009, 1:00 am
    Post #13 - December 20th, 2009, 1:00 am Post #13 - December 20th, 2009, 1:00 am
    Great resources, Cathy2!

    I saw the English translation of "Sju sorters kakor" for the first time at Stockholm's international airport (Arlanda) a few months back. It's interesting/important to note that the translation I saw had translated the language but not the measurements - it was still using grams and liters.

    Regardless of any translation hitches, I highly recommed the book for all things Swedish and sweet. It's got all of the basics (and a plenty of non-basics) and the recipies are often short and simple.

    Thanks again, Cathy2!
  • Post #14 - December 20th, 2009, 1:13 am
    Post #14 - December 20th, 2009, 1:13 am Post #14 - December 20th, 2009, 1:13 am
    Bridgestone,

    Actually, I thank you for your steady campaign to make Swedish cooking less foreign, more familiar and most importantly achievable.

    You treated us to an exploration of Swedish-style cinnamon buns. There was one tiny omission (or at least I didn't find it just now): October 4th is Kanelbullens Dag (Cinnamon Roll Day). A new food holiday to add to our database! Is this a real holiday or something created by the Swedish cinnamon bun bakers? I sensed it may be the real deal, though I'd love your take on it. :)

    If I don't get side-tracked, I plan to make Stollen this week. I have been rereading your post to get me energized.

    Merry Christmas!

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #15 - December 21st, 2009, 2:24 am
    Post #15 - December 21st, 2009, 2:24 am Post #15 - December 21st, 2009, 2:24 am
    Hi again, Cathy2!

    "Kanelbullens dag" hasn't been around for much more than 10 years so, yes, it's a modern holiday. But any excuse to eat more cinammon buns works in my book!

    I've already got a batch of stollen, saffron buns and glögg under my belt for 2009. I'll update my glögg post as this year's batch was/is very tasty. Stollen is magical in that it only gets better the more it sits. Mine second loaf is going on one-week old and will still be excellent on Christmas morning.

    God Jul Cathy2 and the rest of LTHForum!
  • Post #16 - December 27th, 2009, 10:50 am
    Post #16 - December 27th, 2009, 10:50 am Post #16 - December 27th, 2009, 10:50 am
    Thank you Cathy2 for making this resource so easy to find, i've been searching the web all day looking for Swedish style cinnamon buns that i'm going to be making for my relatives for New Years Eve and I came across this post.
    I will let you know how I get on :D
  • Post #17 - December 28th, 2009, 10:46 pm
    Post #17 - December 28th, 2009, 10:46 pm Post #17 - December 28th, 2009, 10:46 pm
    samtrainer wrote:Thank you Cathy2 for making this resource so easy to find, i've been searching the web all day looking for Swedish style cinnamon buns that i'm going to be making for my relatives for New Years Eve and I came across this post.
    I will let you know how I get on :D

    I'm glad you found what you needed, though you should thank Bridgestone only. Look forward to your report on your cinnamon bun baking adventure. :)

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #18 - June 11th, 2012, 9:34 am
    Post #18 - June 11th, 2012, 9:34 am Post #18 - June 11th, 2012, 9:34 am
    Does anyone know what happened to Bridgestone?
  • Post #19 - June 11th, 2012, 5:53 pm
    Post #19 - June 11th, 2012, 5:53 pm Post #19 - June 11th, 2012, 5:53 pm
    razbry wrote:Does anyone know what happened to Bridgestone?

    It was his birthday yesterday. :)

    Drop him a note, he would appreciate it.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #20 - March 19th, 2013, 2:19 am
    Post #20 - March 19th, 2013, 2:19 am Post #20 - March 19th, 2013, 2:19 am
    Wow this is wonderful list. Thanks for making it.
  • Post #21 - January 2nd, 2017, 3:31 am
    Post #21 - January 2nd, 2017, 3:31 am Post #21 - January 2nd, 2017, 3:31 am
    As a Swedish I must tell you how fun it was to read this list. You really managed to include all the classics. Good job!
  • Post #22 - February 8th, 2017, 4:14 am
    Post #22 - February 8th, 2017, 4:14 am Post #22 - February 8th, 2017, 4:14 am
    Tack Lasom!

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