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#1
Posted February 21st 2009, 6:57pm
Conny-Onny Buttie: A Scouser Treat

Visiting with me dar in Florida, we’d come to chat about the scram his ole man ate, like conny-onny buttie, much loved in de pool, our ancestral homeland. Making it’s simple.

1. Ingredients: chuck and conny-onny.

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2. Smear.

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3. Smash in gob. (You’ll be dead chuffed).

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Doodle to make; to be enjoyed till Dick docks.

Take that, wouldja, Bridgestone!
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“We all have to stand before the kitchen gods.” Chef Jacob Sahaya Kumar Aruni
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#2
Posted February 21st 2009, 7:52pm
LOL... When I was growing up in HK, they made the same sandwich! Only we toasted the bread and sometimes we butter the toast. I always thought it was a HK thing!
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#3
Posted February 21st 2009, 9:07pm
CrazyC wrote:LOL... When I was growing up in HK, they made the same sandwich! Only we toasted the bread and sometimes we butter the toast. I always thought it was a HK thing!


Actually, after having it on white bread, which I somehow felt was traditional, I tried toasting it and my daughter and I dug it a lot. Like the music of Wagner, this buttie is much better than it sounds.
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“We all have to stand before the kitchen gods.” Chef Jacob Sahaya Kumar Aruni
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#4
Posted February 21st 2009, 9:15pm
Doesn't Winnie-the-Pooh or Paddington Bear or somebody eat condensed milk sandwiches?
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#5
Posted February 21st 2009, 9:41pm
Ummm...

What language was that, David? :roll:

Mike
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#6
Posted February 21st 2009, 9:54pm
MikeLM wrote:Ummm...

What language was that, David? :roll:

Mike


Hint is on the cutting board...in the box behind the ingredients.

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#7
Posted February 21st 2009, 11:13pm
David Hammond wrote:Hint is on the cutting board...in the box behind the ingredients.

Beetle, Fab Four, Liverpool...........

You are an extremely odd man. Interesting, imaginative, but odd.
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#8
Posted February 22nd 2009, 7:24am
David Hammond wrote:1. Ingredients: chuck and conny-onny.


Which is which?
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Steve Z.

"Why should I eat a carrot when I can eat pizza?" - Dan Janssen
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#9
Posted February 22nd 2009, 8:21am
stevez wrote:
David Hammond wrote:1. Ingredients: chuck and conny-onny.


Which is which?


Conny-onny = condensed milk.
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“We all have to stand before the kitchen gods.” Chef Jacob Sahaya Kumar Aruni
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#10
Posted February 23rd 2009, 7:01pm
I've puzzled over a few Beatles books that talk about "butties" and "sarnies." Do these terms both mean sandwiches or is there a difference? It seemed like they were used interchangeably (ham sarnies, ham butties) but I might be remembering wrong.

P.S. If you are a Beatle fan and you don't at least recognize the above terms and "Scouser," you should spend more of your life reading Beatle books. :wink:
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"things like being careful with your coriander/ that's what makes the gravy grander" - Sondheim
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#11
Posted February 23rd 2009, 9:34pm
grits wrote:I've puzzled over a few Beatles books that talk about "butties" and "sarnies." Do these terms both mean sandwiches or is there a difference?


I'm guessing you could find some scousers who would feel there's a difference between the two words, but I don't know what it is.
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“We all have to stand before the kitchen gods.” Chef Jacob Sahaya Kumar Aruni
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#12
Posted February 24th 2009, 12:07am
Hi,

There is an online dictionary for just about anything. From Dictionary of Slang, buttie or butty is sandwich, originally coined in Northern England and now used throughout. It is a colloquialism for a buttered sandwich. It can also mean a friend.

Sarnie also means sandwich. A 'Bacon Sarni' is slang for Pakistani.

Scouser is a person from Liverpool.

Scouse is a nickname derived from a local stew, called lobscouse aka Sailor's Beef Stew.

Fun with search engines!

Regards,
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"You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
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#13
Posted February 24th 2009, 6:32am
Cathy,

That's fab...a bit of all right!
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Steve Z.

"Why should I eat a carrot when I can eat pizza?" - Dan Janssen
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#14
Posted February 24th 2009, 7:07am
David, what time will you and your droogies be at the Korova milkbar for some milk-plus?
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#15
Posted February 24th 2009, 7:44am
Mike G wrote:David, what time will you and your droogies be at the Korova milkbar for some milk-plus?


Mike, you must know that David is all on for synthemesc and drencrom. They really get you in the yarbles and sharpen you up for a bit of the old ultra-violence.
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#16
Posted February 24th 2009, 10:15am
Cathy2 wrote:There is an online dictionary for just about anything.
Yes, I know, but I wanted to hear from someone who had real experience with someone who used the words. Not everything on the internet is correct.... :wink:
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"things like being careful with your coriander/ that's what makes the gravy grander" - Sondheim
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#17
Posted February 24th 2009, 10:19am
Yummy, I had those as a kid too. Like CrazyC, we'd toast it first. Nowadays I never have white bread at home though.
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#18
Posted February 24th 2009, 10:44pm
grits wrote:
Cathy2 wrote:There is an online dictionary for just about anything.
Yes, I know, but I wanted to hear from someone who had real experience with someone who used the words. Not everything on the internet is correct.... :wink:


Why don't you call the Cultural Attache at the British Consulate? They just might humor your question. I look forward to your report. :)

British Consulate General ukinusa.fco.gov.uk
Suite 1300
400 N Michigan Ave, Chicago, IL 60611
(312) 970-3800

Regards,
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Cathy2

"You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
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#19
Posted February 24th 2009, 10:46pm
grits wrote:
Cathy2 wrote:There is an online dictionary for just about anything.
Yes, I know, but I wanted to hear from someone who had real experience with someone who used the words. Not everything on the internet is correct.... :wink:


Next time I talk to my dad (which will be soon), I'll ask.
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“We all have to stand before the kitchen gods.” Chef Jacob Sahaya Kumar Aruni
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#20
Posted February 25th 2009, 2:11pm
Cathy2 wrote:
grits wrote:
Cathy2 wrote:There is an online dictionary for just about anything.
Yes, I know, but I wanted to hear from someone who had real experience with someone who used the words. Not everything on the internet is correct.... :wink:

Why don't you call the Cultural Attache at the British Consulate? They just might humor your question. I look forward to your report. :)

British Consulate General ukinusa.fco.gov.uk
Suite 1300
400 N Michigan Ave, Chicago, IL 60611
(312) 970-3800
Even better...maybe I could get a grant to study this myself in Liverpool. There's got to be some federal money for me out there somewhere. Cathy you are on to something here!

Or I could just ask Sir Paul the next time he calls me. He's been bugging me again. I've complained to Ringo but he says he can't do anything with him either. Those pesky ex-Beatles.
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"things like being careful with your coriander/ that's what makes the gravy grander" - Sondheim
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#21
Posted February 28th 2009, 12:01pm
David Hammond wrote:
grits wrote:
Cathy2 wrote:There is an online dictionary for just about anything.
Yes, I know, but I wanted to hear from someone who had real experience with someone who used the words. Not everything on the internet is correct.... :wink:
Next time I talk to my dad (which will be soon), I'll ask.
Dave, I actually heard the "sarnie" word last night on TV. It was on a travel show hosted by someone from London: "I've got me sarnies."

It's really a good word. I like it much more than sandwich.

FYI, if I seem a little crazed on food words, I looked seriously into going to grad school in Linguistics. When you combine this and the Beatles, it sort of takes over what's left of my brain.
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"things like being careful with your coriander/ that's what makes the gravy grander" - Sondheim
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#22
Posted March 1st 2009, 7:13pm
My understanding, the last time I've seen the "buttie" vs "sarnie" debate on another message board, was that "buttie" was more a northern British term, and "sarnie" more a southern regionalism.
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#23
Posted March 2nd 2009, 7:00pm
Pucca wrote:Yummy, I had those as a kid too. Like CrazyC, we'd toast it first. Nowadays I never have white bread at home though.


I did too! Clearly, the British Empire's culinary tastes remained/remain deeply embedded in the freed colonies :)

Jyoti
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A meal, with bread and wine, shared with friends and family is among the most essential and important of all human rituals.
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#24
Posted May 3rd 2009, 7:30am
Maybe the Conny-Onny Buttie is the sort of thing that is better eaten at home in one's jammies (what's the slang for jammies?), but in case anyone needs a little bit of comfort right in the middle of NYC, I found it at Saint's Alp Teahouse in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. The menu lists it as one of several varieties of Classic Toast, this version with butter.

Saint's Alp Teahouse
Williamsburg Store
164 Bedford Ave.
Brooklyn, NY
Tel: (718)486-3888
FAx: (718)486-9888

New York University Store
39 3rd Ave.,
New York, NY
Tel: (212)598-1890
Fax: (212)598-1891
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