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Canned Pumpkin - where are you?

Canned Pumpkin - where are you?
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  • Canned Pumpkin - where are you?

    Post #1 - September 23rd, 2009, 7:40 pm
    Post #1 - September 23rd, 2009, 7:40 pm Post #1 - September 23rd, 2009, 7:40 pm
    I feed pumpkin to my digestively-challenged dog - great fiber. For the last few years, I haven't had problems finding Libby canned pumpkin (not the pumpkin pie filling) in the baking section. Beginning in July, I have really struggled to find this product in the usual grocery stores - Jewel, Dominick, Strack and Van Til, Whole Food, etc. I am not tied to Libby. Just looking for any canned pumpkin. Anyone know of a secret pumpkin stash?

    I live in Logan Square, but am willing to drive to get this product. (Lazy me - I'm not looking forward to cooking yams/sweet potatos for the pooch. )

    Thanks
    Wendy
  • Post #2 - September 23rd, 2009, 8:14 pm
    Post #2 - September 23rd, 2009, 8:14 pm Post #2 - September 23rd, 2009, 8:14 pm
    I have seen canned pumpkin consistently at the A&G at Belmont and Central. Now is the time to stock up.

    Good luck with the dog feeding.

    Jen
  • Post #3 - September 23rd, 2009, 8:17 pm
    Post #3 - September 23rd, 2009, 8:17 pm Post #3 - September 23rd, 2009, 8:17 pm
    Check your Jewel store again. I'm pretty certain I saw Fall baking goods, including canned pumpkin , on sale.
    Good luck.

    Jyoti
    Jyoti
    A meal, with bread and wine, shared with friends and family is among the most essential and important of all human rituals.
    Ruhlman
  • Post #4 - September 23rd, 2009, 10:16 pm
    Post #4 - September 23rd, 2009, 10:16 pm Post #4 - September 23rd, 2009, 10:16 pm
    Thanks for the tips. Fair warning - get your pumpkin on, because I will be stocking up. My apocalypse predicting friends should be impressed with the expiration date on those cans.

    In truth - I have been reading about a bumper crop in 2009 - so should be plenty for all.

    Again, thanks.
  • Post #5 - September 24th, 2009, 1:42 pm
    Post #5 - September 24th, 2009, 1:42 pm Post #5 - September 24th, 2009, 1:42 pm
    Over 90% of canned pumpkin comes from the Morton, IL, area, where Libby's has a cannery. This makes the supply unusually sensitive to weather in a small area. The crop was poor in 2008, so supply is limited until the 2009 crop works through the pipeline. The indications I have seen are that 2009 has a good but not spectacular crop.

    Canned pumpkin uses a different variety of pumpkins from the ones used for ornamental purposes. Generalizations about pumpkin supply of other types and growing areas are irrelevant to canned pumpkin supply.
  • Post #6 - September 24th, 2009, 3:14 pm
    Post #6 - September 24th, 2009, 3:14 pm Post #6 - September 24th, 2009, 3:14 pm
    Hi- I use a lot of canned pumpkin to make pancakes, soup, and muffins. I buy most of my canned pumpkin at Aldi's. They have the cheapest canned pumpkin. It is a seasonal item there. They get a bunch of it in the fall, and then have it on the shelves until they run out of it. I bought a bunch in January for either 59 or 69 cents per 16 oz. can. Hope this helps, Nancy
  • Post #7 - September 24th, 2009, 4:01 pm
    Post #7 - September 24th, 2009, 4:01 pm Post #7 - September 24th, 2009, 4:01 pm
    As I just learned from making pie, cooking a fresh pumpkin is as easy as...

    Anyway, just slice up a sugar pumpkin, put it in a pot over a steamer basket, and steam for about 30 minutes depending on the size of the pieces. The skin comes right off. I understand that you can freeze cooked pumpkin too, so you can store treat-size bits in a bag.

    Give your dog a pat on the head for me.
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  • Post #8 - September 24th, 2009, 5:51 pm
    Post #8 - September 24th, 2009, 5:51 pm Post #8 - September 24th, 2009, 5:51 pm
    Whatever you do, observe the expiration dates on the cans. A couple of years ago, I was halfway through making pie before I noticed that the expiration date had recently passed, and so I just kept on making pie -- too late to stop. It was absolutely tasteless! Never again! :cry:
  • Post #9 - September 24th, 2009, 7:11 pm
    Post #9 - September 24th, 2009, 7:11 pm Post #9 - September 24th, 2009, 7:11 pm
    I also add pumpkin to my dog's food, and noticed the lack of it in both the Jewel and Dominick's in Wicker Park/East Village. The Dominick's had pumpkin pie mix (which I mistakenly bought 4 big cans of), but no plain. Please do post when you find a place that has it in stock!
  • Post #10 - September 24th, 2009, 9:49 pm
    Post #10 - September 24th, 2009, 9:49 pm Post #10 - September 24th, 2009, 9:49 pm
    I checked the canned pumpkin supply when I was in A&G this afternoon for other reasons. They had a fair amount on the shelf, certainly more than a case, priced at $1.79/can. Best used by date was in the spring of 2011. We have a couple of cans in the basement purchased last autumn with similar best used by date, so I am guessing that the stuff at A&G is from the 2008 crop but possibly 2007. As wendy noted, the use by dates are pretty far in the future relative to canning date.

    I think that cooking up a sugar or pie pumpkin (two names for same thing) gives better flavor than using canned pumpkin. Moisture content will be higher for the fresh pumpkin than canned, so recipes may need tweaking human applications. My experience is that the various color forms of Hubbard squash produce a bit dryer flesh than pumpkin, more comparable to canned pumpkin, with superior flavor. Mashed, cooked pumpkin and winter squash freeze well. The larger, more ornamental pumpkins tend to be a bit stringy and more watery. I doubt that this would make much difference to a dog. Horses and squirrels love these pumpkins raw. Historically, the larger New England pumpkins were grown to feed cattle and horses in the early part of winter.
  • Post #11 - September 25th, 2009, 11:24 am
    Post #11 - September 25th, 2009, 11:24 am Post #11 - September 25th, 2009, 11:24 am
    there is a shortage. I'm from Peoria (near Morton where Libby's is) and my friend Alison lives in Morton - she's told me there was some issue with the harvest coming late because of the weird summer this year. So, it's harder to find. My Jewel is perpetually out of it.
  • Post #12 - September 27th, 2009, 2:30 pm
    Post #12 - September 27th, 2009, 2:30 pm Post #12 - September 27th, 2009, 2:30 pm
    Trader Joes sometimes has canned organic pumpkin. I think I saw this in the last month or so either at the Park Ridge or Glenview TJ's. No idea what the price was.
    "things like being careful with your coriander/ that's what makes the gravy grander" - Sondheim
  • Post #13 - September 27th, 2009, 3:30 pm
    Post #13 - September 27th, 2009, 3:30 pm Post #13 - September 27th, 2009, 3:30 pm
    JenM wrote:I have seen canned pumpkin consistently at the A&G at Belmont and Central. Now is the time to stock up.

    Good luck with the dog feeding.

    Jen


    Score!! Devin thanks you and I thank you. I've read about A&G before but never followed up with a visit. What a great store. I really appreciate the recommendation.

    For anyone else on the prowl (s4shon), I left some cans on the shelves of A&G. I also did a local run to the small Aldi on Milwaukee and Leavett - no go (yet.)

    This board is such a great resource - helped me locate the pumpkin and understand why i haven't seen it. Many thanks.
  • Post #14 - September 28th, 2009, 1:16 pm
    Post #14 - September 28th, 2009, 1:16 pm Post #14 - September 28th, 2009, 1:16 pm
    wendy wrote: Score!! Devin thanks you and I thank you. I've read about A&G before but never followed up with a visit. What a great store. I really appreciate the recommendation...


    You're welcome! The doggie thanks made my day. I love the A&G, except the parking lot. I will keep an eye out for pumpkin sales.

    Cheers, Jen
  • Post #15 - September 28th, 2009, 4:32 pm
    Post #15 - September 28th, 2009, 4:32 pm Post #15 - September 28th, 2009, 4:32 pm
    I went to 3 different Jewels the other day trying to get my hands on just ONE can of pumpkin for a pumpkin cheesecake (and it was delish). I ended up getting it at Andy's Fruit Ranch on Kedzie. Apparently there really is a shortage of pumpkin this year. Stock up if you find it, because it sure won't be around for long!
    Models Eat too!!!
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  • Post #16 - September 28th, 2009, 7:19 pm
    Post #16 - September 28th, 2009, 7:19 pm Post #16 - September 28th, 2009, 7:19 pm
    I noticed a fairly large shelf display of Libby 30 ounce cans for $2.29 each at the Family Fruit Market this evening. I didn't check the expiration date though...

    Family Fruit Market
    4118 N Cicero Ave
    Chicago, IL 60641
    (773) 481-2500
  • Post #17 - September 28th, 2009, 9:09 pm
    Post #17 - September 28th, 2009, 9:09 pm Post #17 - September 28th, 2009, 9:09 pm
    To reiterate, the shortage is temporary due to a poor crop in 2008. The pipeline is refilling from the 2009 crop after a somewhat late start. Don't go crazy hoarding because there will be a lot of canned pumpkin by November.
  • Post #18 - September 28th, 2009, 9:42 pm
    Post #18 - September 28th, 2009, 9:42 pm Post #18 - September 28th, 2009, 9:42 pm
    Why canned and not fresh?

    You will be able to get pumpkins real cheap 1) after the 1st freeze and 2) after Holloween.
  • Post #19 - September 29th, 2009, 12:23 am
    Post #19 - September 29th, 2009, 12:23 am Post #19 - September 29th, 2009, 12:23 am
    jlawrence01 wrote:Why canned and not fresh?

    You will be able to get pumpkins real cheap 1) after the 1st freeze and 2) after Holloween.


    I admit that it is sheer laziness. :oops: The last 2 weeks I've made him whipped sweet potatoes and it truly isn't a lot of work or difficult to prepare fresh; it just isn't always convenient.
  • Post #20 - September 29th, 2009, 9:11 am
    Post #20 - September 29th, 2009, 9:11 am Post #20 - September 29th, 2009, 9:11 am
    jlawrence01 wrote:Why canned and not fresh?

    You will be able to get pumpkins real cheap 1) after the 1st freeze and 2) after Holloween.
    For me, I always have at least a couple cans of pumpkin in the pantry year round. I use it for a quick pumpkin bread (my usual food gift) or cream of pumpkin soup.
    "things like being careful with your coriander/ that's what makes the gravy grander" - Sondheim
  • Post #21 - September 29th, 2009, 12:41 pm
    Post #21 - September 29th, 2009, 12:41 pm Post #21 - September 29th, 2009, 12:41 pm
    grits wrote:
    jlawrence01 wrote:Why canned and not fresh?

    You will be able to get pumpkins real cheap 1) after the 1st freeze and 2) after Holloween.
    For me, I always have at least a couple cans of pumpkin in the pantry year round. I use it for a quick pumpkin bread (my usual food gift) or cream of pumpkin soup.


    Because my little brother likes "crustless" pumpkin pie, my father will freeze the pulp from the pumpkins he raises. If you get access to some good pumpkins and have the space, it works well.

    I bought some Stokely's canned pumpkin three or four years ago planning to use it like hubbard squash. It was a major disappointment even though it was 0.25/ can.
  • Post #22 - September 29th, 2009, 1:42 pm
    Post #22 - September 29th, 2009, 1:42 pm Post #22 - September 29th, 2009, 1:42 pm
    the jewel on ashland and division has both sizes of libby's canned pumpkin. pumpkin is one of the few canned items that is really worth buying. the quality is very high and it's a whole lot less trouble than cooking and mashing and straining a pumpkin. and it's waiting on your pantry shelf year round. justjoan
  • Post #23 - September 29th, 2009, 5:00 pm
    Post #23 - September 29th, 2009, 5:00 pm Post #23 - September 29th, 2009, 5:00 pm
    My mini-schnauzer has been ill since July. We have been giving her the pumpkin too! She really likes it. We shop at the Jewel at 6 corners or at the one at Foster & Pulaski. We've never had any trouble getting it. They move stuff around all the time, maybe the Svc. Desk can help you locate it.
  • Post #24 - September 30th, 2009, 4:44 pm
    Post #24 - September 30th, 2009, 4:44 pm Post #24 - September 30th, 2009, 4:44 pm
    Hi- I just saw organic canned pumpkin at the Evanston Whole Foods today for $2.99. They had about four cases of it displayed. Hope this helps, Nancy
  • Post #25 - October 1st, 2009, 12:35 am
    Post #25 - October 1st, 2009, 12:35 am Post #25 - October 1st, 2009, 12:35 am
    Hi,

    I was unaware until this thread that pumpkin was a food for dogs, especially ones with allergies. I guess the density of the texture is meaty enough for them? Are you mixing other stuff into the pumpkin?

    Can other squash varieties be consider acceptable substitutes?

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
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  • Post #26 - October 1st, 2009, 9:44 am
    Post #26 - October 1st, 2009, 9:44 am Post #26 - October 1st, 2009, 9:44 am
    grits wrote:
    jlawrence01 wrote:cream of pumpkin soup.


    recipe? :D
  • Post #27 - October 1st, 2009, 10:22 am
    Post #27 - October 1st, 2009, 10:22 am Post #27 - October 1st, 2009, 10:22 am
    Cathy2 wrote:I was unaware until this thread that pumpkin was a food for dogs, especially ones with allergies. I guess the density of the texture is meaty enough for them? Are you mixing other stuff into the pumpkin?

    Can other squash varieties be consider acceptable substitutes?


    The way I have always used it is as a supplement. Something about enzymes.
    Leek

    SAVING ONE DOG may not change the world,
    but it CHANGES THE WORLD for that one dog.
    American Brittany Rescue always needs foster homes. Please think about helping that one dog. http://www.americanbrittanyrescue.org
  • Post #28 - October 1st, 2009, 11:07 am
    Post #28 - October 1st, 2009, 11:07 am Post #28 - October 1st, 2009, 11:07 am
    leek wrote:
    Cathy2 wrote:I was unaware until this thread that pumpkin was a food for dogs, especially ones with allergies. I guess the density of the texture is meaty enough for them? Are you mixing other stuff into the pumpkin?

    Can other squash varieties be consider acceptable substitutes?


    The way I have always used it is as a supplement. Something about enzymes.


    the link in your sig doesn't work. :(
  • Post #29 - October 1st, 2009, 12:23 pm
    Post #29 - October 1st, 2009, 12:23 pm Post #29 - October 1st, 2009, 12:23 pm
    Chitown B wrote:
    grits wrote:
    jlawrence01 wrote:cream of pumpkin soup.


    recipe? :D
    I don't have exact measurements, but saute a diced onion in butter, add some curry powder and cook for a sec, then add about 2 cups stock or water. Bring to a boil and add a few tbsp flour to thicken. Then add a can of pumpkin (or a little under) and heat. You may need more liquid. Add pepper, any other spices you want, salt, sugar or other sweetener to taste. Then add a few tbsp cream or half and half to finish. I usually just play around with it until it is a good taste and texture for me. Maple syrup is nice as a sweetener.
    "things like being careful with your coriander/ that's what makes the gravy grander" - Sondheim
  • Post #30 - October 1st, 2009, 12:42 pm
    Post #30 - October 1st, 2009, 12:42 pm Post #30 - October 1st, 2009, 12:42 pm
    sounds good thanks :)

    so no pumpkin pie spice or the like?

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