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The Butcher & Larder - Noble Square - Rob & Allie Levitt

The Butcher & Larder - Noble Square - Rob & Allie Levitt
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  • The Butcher & Larder - Noble Square - Rob & Allie Levitt

    Post #1 - January 12th, 2011, 5:58 pm
    Post #1 - January 12th, 2011, 5:58 pm Post #1 - January 12th, 2011, 5:58 pm
    Apparently, the opening is happening sometime this week! :)

    Urban Daddy's running a a piece about it today. I'm very much looking forward to checking it out.

    =R=

    The Butcher & Larder
    1026 N Milwaukee Ave
    Chicago, IL 60642
    773-687-8280
    Gardening is a bloodsport --Meghan Kleeman

    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #2 - January 12th, 2011, 5:59 pm
    Post #2 - January 12th, 2011, 5:59 pm Post #2 - January 12th, 2011, 5:59 pm
    There was a mention in Dish as well. I can hardly wait!
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #3 - January 12th, 2011, 6:55 pm
    Post #3 - January 12th, 2011, 6:55 pm Post #3 - January 12th, 2011, 6:55 pm
    Alistair just mentioned today that he wanted some meat.
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #4 - January 12th, 2011, 7:02 pm
    Post #4 - January 12th, 2011, 7:02 pm Post #4 - January 12th, 2011, 7:02 pm
    Image

    Looks like they are starting to take orders (via twitter)!
    "Baseball is like church. Many attend. Few understand." Leo Durocher
  • Post #5 - January 12th, 2011, 8:28 pm
    Post #5 - January 12th, 2011, 8:28 pm Post #5 - January 12th, 2011, 8:28 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Apparently, the opening is happening sometime this week! :)

    Urban Daddy's running a a piece about it today. I'm very much looking forward to checking it out.

    =R=

    The Butcher & Larder
    1026 N Milwaukee Ave
    Chicago, IL 60642
    773-687-8280


    Looks like they jumped the gun, Rob posted this to Butcher and Larder's Facebook page this afternoon:

    Sorry for any confusion from Chi Mag's Dish newsletter. We (sadly) are not opening friday. Stay tuned to Face Book, Twitter and our blog, butchergrip.blogspot.com for the official announcement, Thanks for your patience. Not much longer, we promise!!!
    It is VERY important to be smart when you're doing something stupid

    - Chris

    http://stavewoodworking.com
  • Post #6 - January 13th, 2011, 12:07 pm
    Post #6 - January 13th, 2011, 12:07 pm Post #6 - January 13th, 2011, 12:07 pm
    and here is another article from Chicagoist.

    Butcher & Larder looks to be like no other butcher shop in Chicago. For one thing, there are no mile-long coolers displaying their glistening red wares to the customer. There is just one tiny cooler for charcuterie and daily features. "If a customer asks for a pork chop, we're going to ask 'How thick?' and go and cut it for them," Levitt told us. All meat will be custom cut, and nothing will be pre-wrapped, which means we might be able to find some of those odd cuts of beef that cookbooks are always telling us to use. The wonderful charcuterie we loved at Mado will be a large part of the store's offerings, and they will offer homemade bacon and sausages. Levitt even talked about selling home-cured hams for holiday dinners, once things are up and running.

    Another distinguishing feature that will prove shocking to some but drool-worthy to others: all of the butchery will be done in the open. Butcher and Larder has no back rooms and no hidden spaces. There is a walk-in cooler for storage, but the main butchering space is a giant wooden table right behind the antique cash register. The meat slicer, meat grinder and sausage stuffer are all right in the open, and anyone who wants to get a look at Rob's technique (or the animals that they are eating parts of) will be able to look right in. Levitt acknowledged that this might be shocking, but reminded us that there will be no blood and guts - it's mostly cutting and sawing. Additionally. Levitt believes that it is important for customers to remember that they are eating real animals, not pre-packaged bits of protein.


    SSDD
    He was constantly reminded of how startlingly different a place the world was when viewed from a point only three feet to the left.

    Deepdish Pizza = Casserole
  • Post #7 - January 13th, 2011, 12:12 pm
    Post #7 - January 13th, 2011, 12:12 pm Post #7 - January 13th, 2011, 12:12 pm
    ...and I just realized this is in the old Insight Studios space, where they were before they moved up the street to 1062.

    I just find something interesting in the fact that a place that use to decorate and pierce human flesh is now going to butcher and serve animal flesh.

    SSDD
    He was constantly reminded of how startlingly different a place the world was when viewed from a point only three feet to the left.

    Deepdish Pizza = Casserole
  • Post #8 - January 14th, 2011, 9:16 pm
    Post #8 - January 14th, 2011, 9:16 pm Post #8 - January 14th, 2011, 9:16 pm
    From Headcheese's Chicagoist quote
    Butcher & Larder looks to be like no other butcher shop in Chicago. For one thing, there are no mile-long coolers displaying their glistening red wares to the customer. There is just one tiny cooler for charcuterie and daily features. "If a customer asks for a pork chop, we're going to ask 'How thick?' and go and cut it for them," Levitt told us. All meat will be custom cut, and nothing will be pre-wrapped, which means we might be able to find some of those odd cuts of beef that cookbooks are always telling us to use. The wonderful charcuterie we loved at Mado will be a large part of the store's offerings, and they will offer homemade bacon and sausages. Levitt even talked about selling home-cured hams for holiday dinners, once things are up and running.


    I lived in northern England with some American expats, and they would request steaks cut about 2-1/2" thick at the local butcher shop, which they would bring home and cook on the grill in back. (I would have loved to see the butcher's reaction.) It was nearly impossible to cut through these oddities, which also looked hilarious and were usually either rare or medium rare due to their thickness.
  • Post #9 - January 16th, 2011, 1:01 pm
    Post #9 - January 16th, 2011, 1:01 pm Post #9 - January 16th, 2011, 1:01 pm
    Gapers Block link

    Today this could only be Rob Levitt (although I'm sure his staff are also equally happy), since he's opening The Butcher & Larder today from noon to 4pm. He'll also be open on Monday, which many of you should have off work, from 10am to 7pm. He's starting out with just cuts of meat to sell, but will have his full selection of sandwiches and other gnoshables on Wednesday


    SSDD
    He was constantly reminded of how startlingly different a place the world was when viewed from a point only three feet to the left.

    Deepdish Pizza = Casserole
  • Post #10 - January 17th, 2011, 11:07 am
    Post #10 - January 17th, 2011, 11:07 am Post #10 - January 17th, 2011, 11:07 am
    Well, if the Italian sausage I got is half as good as the breakfast sausage I just fried up, I'll be very happy. The breakfast links, about 8 or 10 to the ten-dollar pound, packed a well-seasoned punch for a morning wurst--sage, garlic, fennel, and pepper, mellowed by ground-in maple syrup. Worth the price.
  • Post #11 - January 17th, 2011, 9:36 pm
    Post #11 - January 17th, 2011, 9:36 pm Post #11 - January 17th, 2011, 9:36 pm
    I stopped by there today and they had run out of my top three choices (pig jowl, breakfast sausage and bacon). I did pick up a chicken. In the next week or so they plan to have more charcuterie and sandwiches, and more importantly, shortbread, per one of the counter folks. It sounds like this week is more of a soft opening--they will have more later in the week. Everyone was extremely friendly and helpful. I can't wait 'till this place is operating at full speed. If anyone is planning on heading there for something specific, you may want to call first.
  • Post #12 - January 17th, 2011, 9:39 pm
    Post #12 - January 17th, 2011, 9:39 pm Post #12 - January 17th, 2011, 9:39 pm
    thaiobsessed wrote:I stopped by there today and they had run out of my top three choices (pig jowl, breakfast sausage and bacon). I did pick up a chicken. In the next week or so they plan to have more charcuterie and sandwiches, and more importantly, shortbread, per one of the counter folks. It sounds like this week is more of a soft opening--they will have more later in the week. Everyone was extremely friendly and helpful. I can't wait 'till this place is operating at full speed. If anyone is planning on heading there for something specific, you may want to call first.


    You have jowl on the mind don't you? What beef cuts were there? May try to stop by between court calls. Husband wants meat. He can cook for himself while I'm gone.
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #13 - January 18th, 2011, 8:53 am
    Post #13 - January 18th, 2011, 8:53 am Post #13 - January 18th, 2011, 8:53 am
    When I was there on Sunday, the beef cuts were plentiful, but it looks like yesterday had really heavy traffic. I had picked up some bacon and about 7 lbs. of beef navel. The navel was gorgeous and will be beef bacon and pastrami before Sunday.

    To be honest, I am usually a pork guy, but the beef at B&L looks so much better than I have seen available through traditional methods (Paulina, Gepperth's, etc.). The bacon was the best that I have had from a Chicago butcher and while it is in a different style from Benton's, makes me think twice about going through the trouble of mail ordering it. My understanding was that the pork was from a Michigan farm and was fed fruit, if not exclusively, then extensively.
  • Post #14 - January 18th, 2011, 11:50 am
    Post #14 - January 18th, 2011, 11:50 am Post #14 - January 18th, 2011, 11:50 am
    Thanks. Luckily I double checked the website. Closed on Tuesdays.
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #15 - January 18th, 2011, 10:27 pm
    Post #15 - January 18th, 2011, 10:27 pm Post #15 - January 18th, 2011, 10:27 pm
    For those curious about the beef navel, I split into two sections:

    The first for pastrami:
    Image
    The second for beef bacon:
    Image
    Finally, the bacon:
    Image
  • Post #16 - January 19th, 2011, 12:10 am
    Post #16 - January 19th, 2011, 12:10 am Post #16 - January 19th, 2011, 12:10 am
    HI,

    Thanks! I had heard of the naval beef cut, though I have never seen one. I was at a tour of Vienna Beef last spring where this cut was discussed. How much did it weigh? How much did it cost per pound?

    Again, thanks!

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #17 - January 19th, 2011, 7:04 am
    Post #17 - January 19th, 2011, 7:04 am Post #17 - January 19th, 2011, 7:04 am
    Cathy2 wrote:HI,

    Thanks! I had heard of the naval beef cut, though I have never seen one. I was at a tour of Vienna Beef last spring where this cut was discussed. How much did it weigh? How much did it cost per pound?

    Again, thanks!

    Regards,


    Cathy2,

    The navel was between 6 and 7 pounds and was long and triangular. I do not recall the price per pound. Apologies. With 4 days in the cure, the future beef bacon looks like a pork belly with the color wheel moved further towards a dark red. The future pastrami went in the brine last night. At this point, I almost regret not taking a little off of both pieces and braising it to get an idea of flavor.

    Mark
  • Post #18 - January 19th, 2011, 11:07 am
    Post #18 - January 19th, 2011, 11:07 am Post #18 - January 19th, 2011, 11:07 am
    I'll be curious to learn how the naval sections work out in their applications -- especially the pastrami. I'd always heard that "true" pastrami is supposed to be made with naval, not brisket. So, I tried it a couple of years back and thought that the resulting product was unpalatably fatty (and I like it fatty). The naval in your pics looks more trim than what I had, though. Please keep us updated.

    =R=
    Gardening is a bloodsport --Meghan Kleeman

    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #19 - January 19th, 2011, 7:09 pm
    Post #19 - January 19th, 2011, 7:09 pm Post #19 - January 19th, 2011, 7:09 pm
    thaiobsessed wrote:I stopped by there today and they had run out of my top three choices (pig jowl, breakfast sausage and bacon). I did pick up a chicken. In the next week or so they plan to have more charcuterie and sandwiches, and more importantly, shortbread, per one of the counter folks. It sounds like this week is more of a soft opening--they will have more later in the week. Everyone was extremely friendly and helpful. I can't wait 'till this place is operating at full speed. If anyone is planning on heading there for something specific, you may want to call first.



    I grabbed one jowl on Monday. It's in a salt cure as I type this. Taking my 1st stab at guanciale. One fat jowl cost me about $5.

    Rob was awesome and took plenty of time to show me the ropes of a cut i've never used before. Already impressed w/ them at 1/2 speed.
  • Post #20 - January 19th, 2011, 7:53 pm
    Post #20 - January 19th, 2011, 7:53 pm Post #20 - January 19th, 2011, 7:53 pm
    pairs4life wrote:You have jowl on the mind don't you? What beef cuts were there? May try to stop by between court calls. Husband wants meat. He can cook for himself while I'm gone.


    Glad msmre fielded this one. I saw some steaks and beef tongue and beef cheek in the case but otherwised didn't pay too much attention (couldn't see the cuts through the tears of disappointment when I realized there was no jowl)

    Raccoon wrote:I grabbed one jowl on Monday. It's in a salt cure as I type this. Taking my 1st stab at guanciale. One fat jowl cost me about $5
    )

    That's my goal too--I found a spot in my basement that's 56 degrees--can't wait to make a pork mobile to hang from the pipes down there to cure some guanciale and pancetta. I'd love to hear how it goes.
  • Post #21 - January 20th, 2011, 9:29 pm
    Post #21 - January 20th, 2011, 9:29 pm Post #21 - January 20th, 2011, 9:29 pm
    Ronna and I were lucky enough to attend a New Year's Eve meal prepared by Rob Levitt and the crew of the Butcher & Larder. Although not technically a Butcher & Larder meal, this celebration of gluttony was very much in the style of the family dinners at Mado (RIP), a tradition that I hope Rob will continue in the new space once B&L settles into its groove.

    I'll let the pictures tell the tale:

    Soy/Ginger Smoked Spare Ribs
    Image

    Roasted Marrow Bones
    Image

    Boudin
    Image

    Olive Oil Poached Sable with marinated kale and chick peas
    Image

    Oysters
    Image

    Marinated Baby Octopus
    Image

    Whole-Roasted Foie Gras with spaetzle and red cabbage
    Image

    Roasted Saddle of Lamb Boulangere
    Image
    Image

    Ginger Stout Cake with whipped cream and pistachios (Oh, how I miss Allie's desserts. More please.)
    Image

    --Rich
    I don't know what you think about dinner, but there must be a relation between the breakfast and the happiness. --Cemal Süreyya
  • Post #22 - January 21st, 2011, 8:50 am
    Post #22 - January 21st, 2011, 8:50 am Post #22 - January 21st, 2011, 8:50 am
    Great pics, Rich. A light first course of ribs, marrow bones, and boudin was a great indicator of how the rest of the night would go. I hurt the next morning.
  • Post #23 - January 22nd, 2011, 7:03 am
    Post #23 - January 22nd, 2011, 7:03 am Post #23 - January 22nd, 2011, 7:03 am
    I'm ecstatic Butcher and Larder is open!

    Under construction (11.28.10)

    Image

    Image

    Image

    Open (1.21.11)

    Image

    Image

    Image

    Image

    Complaint dept.

    Image
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #24 - January 22nd, 2011, 12:38 pm
    Post #24 - January 22nd, 2011, 12:38 pm Post #24 - January 22nd, 2011, 12:38 pm
    Image

    Flavorful buttery dogs from Butcher and Larder topped w/ some of my homemade Cincy chili. Lunch heaven. Don't tell my wife, she's out right now getting me some brisket from Smoque.


    Image

    Jowl on its 3rd day in the cure.
  • Post #25 - January 22nd, 2011, 6:39 pm
    Post #25 - January 22nd, 2011, 6:39 pm Post #25 - January 22nd, 2011, 6:39 pm
    The Butcher and Larder was well stocked on Thursday and I picked up a couple pork jowls for guanciale. Rob gave me some good tips (the main one being to check the humidity in the cold area in my basement). I also picked up a couple porchetta sandwiches--they were excellent, even given that we waited a day to consume them.

    I roasted the chicken I got on Monday per the Zuni cafe recipe with bread salad. It was really an outstanding chicken.

    Chicken
    Image
  • Post #26 - January 26th, 2011, 10:10 am
    Post #26 - January 26th, 2011, 10:10 am Post #26 - January 26th, 2011, 10:10 am
    The beef navel pastrami turned out really well. After Ronnie's comments, I was concerned about the fattiness of the navel, but after steaming the slices, it was really, really good. I highly recommend the navel cut as it was more flavorful than the brisket flat.

    The Pastrami (before steaming)
    Image

    The Pastrami (after steaming)
    Image
  • Post #27 - January 26th, 2011, 10:33 am
    Post #27 - January 26th, 2011, 10:33 am Post #27 - January 26th, 2011, 10:33 am
    msmre wrote:The beef navel pastrami turned out really well. After Ronnie's comments, I was concerned about the fattiness of the navel, but after steaming the slices, it was really, really good. I highly recommend the navel cut as it was more flavorful than the brisket flat.

    Looks absolutely beautiful. By sheer coincidence I had some naval pastrami last Friday that a friend was experimenting with and it was fantastic, too. I'll definitely have to stop by Butcher & Larder and give this a whirl.

    =R=
    Gardening is a bloodsport --Meghan Kleeman

    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #28 - January 26th, 2011, 10:36 am
    Post #28 - January 26th, 2011, 10:36 am Post #28 - January 26th, 2011, 10:36 am
    msmre wrote:The Pastrami (after steaming)
    Looks absolutely delectable!
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #29 - January 27th, 2011, 10:46 pm
    Post #29 - January 27th, 2011, 10:46 pm Post #29 - January 27th, 2011, 10:46 pm
    I stopped in tonight to pick up a pork shoulder and when Rob first grabbed a 4lb piece, I told him that I would need something bigger. No problem, he said, and he went into the locker to bring out half a pig. He removed the entire shoulder and talked to me about the boston butt and picnic cuts before cutting for me a nearly 12lb. monster boston butt. He even went the extra step and removed some of the skin as well as score the remaining patch so it'll crisp up nicely while cooking.

    Everyone there seemed so excited to be talking to folks about different cuts, pates, etc. I'm psyched that I live so close (though my wallet may disagree).

    Also, the store smelled delicious!
    best,
    dan
  • Post #30 - January 28th, 2011, 8:04 am
    Post #30 - January 28th, 2011, 8:04 am Post #30 - January 28th, 2011, 8:04 am
    danimalarkey wrote:Also, the store smelled delicious!


    Yes, it smelled delicious when I was there yesterday. I heard that the two items, the only two items so far, that face buyer resistance are beef spleen and ram testicles. So, if you have a recipe for either (cf Fergus H for the spleen), you can have your pick.
    Think Yiddish, Dress British - Advice of Evil Ronnie to me.

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