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Ottolenghi: Cooking from Jerusalem and Plenty

Ottolenghi: Cooking from Jerusalem and Plenty
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  • Post #61 - February 14th, 2014, 8:16 am
    Post #61 - February 14th, 2014, 8:16 am Post #61 - February 14th, 2014, 8:16 am
    Also, I found that other English speaking peoples refer to Capsicum in recipes and (probably) mean generic sweet red bell pepper.
    Leek

    SAVING ONE DOG may not change the world,
    but it CHANGES THE WORLD for that one dog.
    American Brittany Rescue always needs foster homes. Please think about helping that one dog. http://www.americanbrittanyrescue.org
  • Post #62 - February 14th, 2014, 4:25 pm
    Post #62 - February 14th, 2014, 4:25 pm Post #62 - February 14th, 2014, 4:25 pm
    Great pictures! I've been wanting to try the Castelluccio lentils but I'm always put off slightly by the dill. Doesn't it overpower? Often there's one ingredient in his recipes that confuses me a little, but I guess that's his originality. I made the Celeriac and lentils (suspicious ingredient for me was mint) but it really grew on me. It was great.
  • Post #63 - February 14th, 2014, 7:48 pm
    Post #63 - February 14th, 2014, 7:48 pm Post #63 - February 14th, 2014, 7:48 pm
    CharlotteBeth wrote:Great pictures! I've been wanting to try the Castelluccio lentils but I'm always put off slightly by the dill. Doesn't it overpower? Often there's one ingredient in his recipes that confuses me a little, but I guess that's his originality. I made the Celeriac and lentils (suspicious ingredient for me was mint) but it really grew on me. It was great.


    I don't consider myself a lover of dill or mint, but I do whatever he says to do and it's always gorgeous.
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #64 - February 14th, 2014, 9:22 pm
    Post #64 - February 14th, 2014, 9:22 pm Post #64 - February 14th, 2014, 9:22 pm
    Yeah, I'm starting to trust him. Tonight I made the sweet potatoes with lemongrass creme fraiche and it was fantastic. Only change I made was to add a bit of shallot to the cream.

    pairs4life wrote:
    CharlotteBeth wrote:Great pictures! I've been wanting to try the Castelluccio lentils but I'm always put off slightly by the dill. Doesn't it overpower? Often there's one ingredient in his recipes that confuses me a little, but I guess that's his originality. I made the Celeriac and lentils (suspicious ingredient for me was mint) but it really grew on me. It was great.


    I don't consider myself a lover of dill or mint, but I do whatever he says to do and it's always gorgeous.
  • Post #65 - February 16th, 2014, 11:14 am
    Post #65 - February 16th, 2014, 11:14 am Post #65 - February 16th, 2014, 11:14 am
    Fantastic food and conversation at our neighbor's home last night. The main dishes were from Ottolenghi and Tamimi's Jerusalem. I forgot to grab a picture of the lovely poached pears with saffron and cardamom.
    image.jpg Chicken with Arak and Clementines
    image.jpg Kuku with Barberries and Fava
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #66 - February 16th, 2014, 12:17 pm
    Post #66 - February 16th, 2014, 12:17 pm Post #66 - February 16th, 2014, 12:17 pm
    pairs4life wrote:Fantastic food and conversation at our neighbor's home last night. The main dishes were from Ottolenghi and Tamimi's Jerusalem. I forgot to grab a picture of the lovely poached pears with saffron and cardamom.


    I want to make friends with your neighbors!
  • Post #67 - February 16th, 2014, 5:16 pm
    Post #67 - February 16th, 2014, 5:16 pm Post #67 - February 16th, 2014, 5:16 pm
    Those look great! Where did you find barberries?

    I realized looking through this thread there are some pics I'd been meaning to post:

    I love the fattoush from Jerulaem:

    Image


    The eggplant with bulgur is also a favorite:
    Image

    We made the stuffed peppers a while ago (shown here in-progress)--really need to make these again:
    Image
  • Post #68 - April 3rd, 2014, 9:45 am
    Post #68 - April 3rd, 2014, 9:45 am Post #68 - April 3rd, 2014, 9:45 am
    We've just started cooking our way through Plenty, and boy am I excited to keep going! Sunday night we tried the Caramelized Fennel with Goat Cheese (as a side to a roast chicken)....so simple and yet really complex and layered.

    Last night's dinner was the Herbed Mushrooms with Polenta. Love, love this dish. Definite keeper for the no-meat nights in our house.
    "There’s only one thing I hate more than lying: skim milk, which is water that’s lying about being milk."
    - Ron Swanson
  • Post #69 - April 6th, 2014, 1:23 pm
    Post #69 - April 6th, 2014, 1:23 pm Post #69 - April 6th, 2014, 1:23 pm
    For those of you who own both books, if you could have only one, which would it be? I'd like to get one, and may eventually get the other, but which should I start with?
  • Post #70 - April 6th, 2014, 5:23 pm
    Post #70 - April 6th, 2014, 5:23 pm Post #70 - April 6th, 2014, 5:23 pm
    knitgirl wrote:For those of you who own both books, if you could have only one, which would it be? I'd like to get one, and may eventually get the other, but which should I start with?


    I'm vegetarian and Plenty has not failed me with every meat eater I know. I've looked through Jerusalem and if you eat animals, start there, but they are definitely different books. I don't think it is redundant to have both.
    Last edited by pairs4life on April 8th, 2014, 5:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #71 - April 6th, 2014, 6:08 pm
    Post #71 - April 6th, 2014, 6:08 pm Post #71 - April 6th, 2014, 6:08 pm
    Our household is also working its way through the Jerusalem cookbook. A particular fave is the burnt eggplant and mograbieh soup (p. 141). The whipped, burnt eggplant gives the soup a wonderful fatty mouthfeel; it's a practically a bisque. My 7-year old, told she could pick anything for dinner last night, chose this soup.
  • Post #72 - April 7th, 2014, 12:33 pm
    Post #72 - April 7th, 2014, 12:33 pm Post #72 - April 7th, 2014, 12:33 pm
    I'm doing a dinner for a large group in a few months. Menu planning phase is now underway, and I'm just in love with this book. Does anyone have thoughts about which dishes might hold well overnight? I need something that can be cooled, held and reheated successfully that will appeal to kids and adults. I'm kind of thinking about the chicken with clementines, but I think chicken skin tends to get flabby and unpleasant when it is held over, and that breasts tend to dry out without the skin. Ideas?
    Man : I can't understand how a poet like you can eat that stuff.
    T. S. Eliot: Ah, but you're not a poet.
  • Post #73 - April 7th, 2014, 2:18 pm
    Post #73 - April 7th, 2014, 2:18 pm Post #73 - April 7th, 2014, 2:18 pm
    Josephine wrote:I'm doing a dinner for a large group in a few months. Menu planning phase is now underway, and I'm just in love with this book. Does anyone have thoughts about which dishes might hold well overnight? I need something that can be cooled, held and reheated successfully that will appeal to kids and adults. I'm kind of thinking about the chicken with clementines, but I think chicken skin tends to get flabby and unpleasant when it is held over, and that breasts tend to dry out without the skin. Ideas?

    The eggplant with chermoula and bulgur definitely keeps overnight.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #74 - April 8th, 2014, 5:32 pm
    Post #74 - April 8th, 2014, 5:32 pm Post #74 - April 8th, 2014, 5:32 pm
    pairs4life wrote:
    knitgirl wrote:For those of you who own both books, if you could have only one, which would it be? I'd like to get one, and may eventually get the other, but which should I start with?


    I'm vegetarian and Plenty has no failed me with every meat eater I know. I've looked through Jerusalem and if you eat animals, start there, but they are definitely different books. I don't think it is redundant to have both.


    Thanks Pairs4life! I'm cutting back on meat, especially with local produce coming sometime this year, so I have Plenty on order.
  • Post #75 - April 8th, 2014, 8:03 pm
    Post #75 - April 8th, 2014, 8:03 pm Post #75 - April 8th, 2014, 8:03 pm
    I highly recommend the broccoli and Gorgonzola pie. My wife made it a few days ago and I've been enjoying the leftovers. It's excellent and reheats great.

    photo 3.JPG

    photo 2.JPG
  • Post #76 - April 10th, 2014, 3:01 pm
    Post #76 - April 10th, 2014, 3:01 pm Post #76 - April 10th, 2014, 3:01 pm
    I got my copy today - will post again once I've made a few things. I've only had a chance to skim it, it's a gorgeous book.
  • Post #77 - April 11th, 2014, 8:44 am
    Post #77 - April 11th, 2014, 8:44 am Post #77 - April 11th, 2014, 8:44 am
    knitgirl wrote:I got my copy today - will post again once I've made a few things. I've only had a chance to skim it, it's a gorgeous book.

    Be careful with the puffy cover, it gets dinged fairly easily.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #78 - April 11th, 2014, 11:09 am
    Post #78 - April 11th, 2014, 11:09 am Post #78 - April 11th, 2014, 11:09 am
    Thanks for the hint - I've never had a book with that kind of cover before! I went through it last night - SO many things I want to try, having a hard time deciding which, but the black pepper tofu is really appealing to me.
  • Post #79 - April 12th, 2014, 3:20 pm
    Post #79 - April 12th, 2014, 3:20 pm Post #79 - April 12th, 2014, 3:20 pm
    knitgirl wrote: SO many things I want to try, having a hard time deciding which, but the black pepper tofu is really appealing to me.


    It is on fire! And. Delicious.
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #80 - April 12th, 2014, 3:30 pm
    Post #80 - April 12th, 2014, 3:30 pm Post #80 - April 12th, 2014, 3:30 pm
    I stumbled across the Castelluccio Lentils with Tomatoes and Gorgonzola on the net quite by accident.
    It's fantastic.
  • Post #81 - April 23rd, 2014, 8:10 am
    Post #81 - April 23rd, 2014, 8:10 am Post #81 - April 23rd, 2014, 8:10 am
    I made the Freekeh pilaf from Plenty, page 241, to accompany a roast chicken last night-- it was delicious. Freekeh is green wheat, burnt off the stalk, so it has a tiny bit of smoky flavor and a satisfying chew. I used chicken broth instead of veg, and added some chives to the yogurt. Chives were the only fresh herbs I had-- I think this would be even better with the cilantro and parsley specified in the recipe. A great change from our usual jasmine rice.

    One problem is the freekeh I got (Ziyah brand) has some grit in it-- next time, in addition to running water through it, I will do the salad green type of rinse, where you use a lot of water and try to take the grain or salad off of the top, leaving the grit at the bottom. The freekeh sinks, so this might be hard-- I would appreciate any tips on making my freekeh less gritteh.

    Cheers, Jen
  • Post #82 - April 24th, 2014, 10:13 am
    Post #82 - April 24th, 2014, 10:13 am Post #82 - April 24th, 2014, 10:13 am
    Pie-love wrote: I would appreciate any tips on making my freekeh less gritteh.


    New Banner Quote!!!
    Man : I can't understand how a poet like you can eat that stuff.
    T. S. Eliot: Ah, but you're not a poet.
  • Post #83 - May 12th, 2014, 9:39 am
    Post #83 - May 12th, 2014, 9:39 am Post #83 - May 12th, 2014, 9:39 am
    Planning to make the Mee Goreng from Plenty tonight....the recipe calls for "thick soy sauce." Thought I'd stop by Joong Boo on the way home; am I likely to find this there? Any brand recommendations?

    Have been looking forward to trying this dish for several weeks!
    "There’s only one thing I hate more than lying: skim milk, which is water that’s lying about being milk."
    - Ron Swanson
  • Post #84 - May 12th, 2014, 11:07 am
    Post #84 - May 12th, 2014, 11:07 am Post #84 - May 12th, 2014, 11:07 am
    bfolds wrote:Planning to make the Mee Goreng from Plenty tonight....the recipe calls for "thick soy sauce." Thought I'd stop by Joong Boo on the way home; am I likely to find this there? Any brand recommendations?

    Have been looking forward to trying this dish for several weeks!

    Currently I have a jar from Koon Hun, which I'm pretty happy with.
    You may also see it labeled 'kecap manis'.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #85 - May 12th, 2014, 11:08 am
    Post #85 - May 12th, 2014, 11:08 am Post #85 - May 12th, 2014, 11:08 am
    That's so helpful -- thanks! Had no idea this was the same thing as kecap manis.

    I'll report back on the results.
    "There’s only one thing I hate more than lying: skim milk, which is water that’s lying about being milk."
    - Ron Swanson
  • Post #86 - May 12th, 2014, 9:13 pm
    Post #86 - May 12th, 2014, 9:13 pm Post #86 - May 12th, 2014, 9:13 pm
    bfolds wrote:That's so helpful -- thanks! Had no idea this was the same thing as kecap manis.

    I'll report back on the results.



    Yes. Sweet soy. It is also used in the black pepper tofu dish. A friend came over when I made fried rice and I placed the kecap manis on the table. She now can't have fried rice without it. I bought her a bottle from the Broadway store by Argyle /Berwyn.
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #87 - May 13th, 2014, 9:43 am
    Post #87 - May 13th, 2014, 9:43 am Post #87 - May 13th, 2014, 9:43 am
    Well the attempt at Mee Goreng was not successful -- the sauce didn't really get absorbed into the tofu or noodles, so the dish just really didn't come together. I'm not giving up and will try again as I think know the modifications I need to make. I used Phoenix Bean baked tofu and I think that extra firm "regular" tofu would have been a better choice. I'd also rinse the noodles next time before cooking to get rid of some of the starch (they just wanted to cling together in an ugly mass).

    If anyone else has had success with this recipe, I'd love to have any other tips. For now, I have to find a home for all the leftover iceberg lettuce and bean sprouts in the fridge.
    "There’s only one thing I hate more than lying: skim milk, which is water that’s lying about being milk."
    - Ron Swanson
  • Post #88 - September 22nd, 2014, 1:34 pm
    Post #88 - September 22nd, 2014, 1:34 pm Post #88 - September 22nd, 2014, 1:34 pm
    I recently made Chickpeas with Sweet Potatoes http://www.ottolenghi.co.uk/chickpeas-a ... otato-shop and Roast Chicken with Zataar and Sumac http://www.ottolenghi.co.uk/roast-chick ... lemon-shop (if you google around you can find the how-to for these)

    Both were wonderful. In the first, the best part was the soupy mixture of everything with the yogurt sauce. I could have eaten just that yogurt sauce (I used fresh mint from my garden, not dried). In the second, I roasted the chicken part-way, then took everything out of the pan, put pita underneath it, and put all the chicken, lemon and onions back on top. It was phenomenal. I think a flatbread (not lavash) would have worked better, but even so, it was really really good. A must do!

    Does Treasure Island carry Sumac? I got mine up at Sanabel, but TI is a lot closer to home - I forgot to even try to check there. No luck at Mariano's, despite their big "spice" section.
    Leek

    SAVING ONE DOG may not change the world,
    but it CHANGES THE WORLD for that one dog.
    American Brittany Rescue always needs foster homes. Please think about helping that one dog. http://www.americanbrittanyrescue.org
  • Post #89 - September 22nd, 2014, 3:14 pm
    Post #89 - September 22nd, 2014, 3:14 pm Post #89 - September 22nd, 2014, 3:14 pm
    leek wrote:Does Treasure Island carry Sumac? I got mine up at Sanabel, but TI is a lot closer to home - I forgot to even try to check there. No luck at Mariano's, despite their big "spice" section.


    Have you tried GNR Spice House?
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #90 - September 22nd, 2014, 4:21 pm
    Post #90 - September 22nd, 2014, 4:21 pm Post #90 - September 22nd, 2014, 4:21 pm
    Thanks, I am not lacking sumac at the moment. I live close to a TI, and was just wondering for the future. Given their mediterranean roots, I thought someone might have seen it there.
    Leek

    SAVING ONE DOG may not change the world,
    but it CHANGES THE WORLD for that one dog.
    American Brittany Rescue always needs foster homes. Please think about helping that one dog. http://www.americanbrittanyrescue.org

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