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Welcome to Spring, Green City Market Saturdays

Welcome to Spring, Green City Market Saturdays
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  • Welcome to Spring, Green City Market Saturdays

    Post #1 - May 21st, 2005, 12:44 pm
    Post #1 - May 21st, 2005, 12:44 pm Post #1 - May 21st, 2005, 12:44 pm
    Got myself up early this morning to check out the first Green City Market Saturday of the season. Since I don't work in the city, the Wednesday market is impossible to get to. Thanks to the green city board for Saturdays!

    It was a nice cool sunny morning. The folks from Nichols and Judson farms were out hawking their produce.

    Image

    The usual spring produce was in abundance, there was a menagarie of radishes, green leafy veg such as arugala, spinach, mesclun, spring onions, and chives.

    Image

    Also, lots of farm fresh eggs, and the Panini and Crepe folks.

    And most importantly, some Bennison Bakery 7 grain bread. This stuff is so perfect. It has a very nutty hearty crust, and a soft chewy interior.

    Image

    It was a wonderful morning and I look forward to many more this year.
  • Post #2 - May 22nd, 2005, 9:54 am
    Post #2 - May 22nd, 2005, 9:54 am Post #2 - May 22nd, 2005, 9:54 am
    Thanks for the report. I've been really interested to hear what's in these early markets.

    Any asparagus?
    Think Yiddish, Dress British - Advice of Evil Ronnie to me.
  • Post #3 - May 22nd, 2005, 10:10 am
    Post #3 - May 22nd, 2005, 10:10 am Post #3 - May 22nd, 2005, 10:10 am
    ROb,

    Asparagus should be there. Its available at many roadstands in SW Michigan.
    Bruce
    Plenipotentiary
    bruce@bdbbq.com

    Raw meat should NOT have an ingredients list!!
  • Post #4 - May 22nd, 2005, 10:40 am
    Post #4 - May 22nd, 2005, 10:40 am Post #4 - May 22nd, 2005, 10:40 am
    Nichols farm had some nice healthy bunches of asparagus.
  • Post #5 - May 22nd, 2005, 7:28 pm
    Post #5 - May 22nd, 2005, 7:28 pm Post #5 - May 22nd, 2005, 7:28 pm
    We picked up some purple and green asparagus, as well as a nice selection of mushrooms (morels were available, but went quickly), some rhubarb, baby bok choy and baby spinach. The organic chicken we bought is roasting in the oven as I type. We got there around 9 am, and, honestly (and stupidly, I suppose) I was a little surprised to see that the stands were already looking a bit picked over.
  • Post #6 - May 24th, 2005, 8:59 am
    Post #6 - May 24th, 2005, 8:59 am Post #6 - May 24th, 2005, 8:59 am
    The organic chicken we bought is roasting in the oven as I type.


    We had the chicken as well on Sunday along with the purple asparagus (a favorite of mine for reasons that soon will be revealed) and it was outstanding. The chicken was tender and sweet and incredibly fresh tasting.
    MAG
    www.monogrammeevents.com

    "I've never met a pork product I didn't like."
  • Post #7 - June 1st, 2005, 2:52 pm
    Post #7 - June 1st, 2005, 2:52 pm Post #7 - June 1st, 2005, 2:52 pm
    We missed the first couple of weeks of Chicago's Green City Market, but it took only one visit to convince me that it is better than ever. From its start, Green City has included vendors selling produce both organic and unique. That makes it a very good farmer's market. Yet, it did not stop there. Over the last few years, Green City has added several vendors offering local, organic meats such as Piedmontese style beef. And we are not talking a few chickens and a bunch of eggs. One could get bratwurst made from Illinois pork, bacon, parts including liver and kidneys, heritage turkeys, etc. More, more, more. A couple of years ago, Traderspoint, an organic dairy based in Indiana began offering their freakishly good milk and yogurt. How could they top it in 2005?

    How 'bout stone ground organic grains from a water-run mill? 2005's Green City Market now has an array of products from Wilmont Milling Company (est 1840!). Grits made from white popcorn, polenta from yellow corn, even a grind made from Indian corn (also oatmeal, bread flour, rye, etc.). I found, that at $8 for 24 ounces, it was not a bad deal at all. I have yet to make it, but it looks great (and I doubt I will ever do a direct taste test with some of the mail order stone ground grits guys out there). Still, it adds to the completeness of the Green City Market.

    Of course, I like my Oak Park market the best (which this year will include meat and eggs), but I like it for reasons not just food. I am most impressed with Green City.

    NB: Wilmont Milling will only be at the market on Wednesdays. On Saturdays, they will be at the Indianapolis market.
    Think Yiddish, Dress British - Advice of Evil Ronnie to me.
  • Post #8 - June 1st, 2005, 4:16 pm
    Post #8 - June 1st, 2005, 4:16 pm Post #8 - June 1st, 2005, 4:16 pm
    http://www.wilmotmill.com/

    Did they have spoons for sale? I am a wooden utensil fetishish* and got a bit excited by the wares shown on their website. Thanks for the great report!!

    Kristen

    *This sounds much racier than I intended...
  • Post #9 - June 2nd, 2005, 11:07 am
    Post #9 - June 2nd, 2005, 11:07 am Post #9 - June 2nd, 2005, 11:07 am
    The best part of the Oak Park market is the freshly cooked donuts. The ones with the powdered sugar on them are like crack. And the ones with cinnamon sugar ain't bad either.

    I also kind of enjoy the bluegrass (?) music, though opinions in my family are sharply divided on that topic.
  • Post #10 - June 2nd, 2005, 7:55 pm
    Post #10 - June 2nd, 2005, 7:55 pm Post #10 - June 2nd, 2005, 7:55 pm
    Kristen,

    You should check out whetstonewoodenware.com. I'm not sure they are the same wares shown on the Wilmotmill site, but they are handmade in Indiana. I've given them as presents to grateful friends. I particularly love the scoops.

    Yours,
    Molly
  • Post #11 - June 3rd, 2005, 7:40 am
    Post #11 - June 3rd, 2005, 7:40 am Post #11 - June 3rd, 2005, 7:40 am
    Here's some follow-up:

    Salt, sweet, sour, bitter. Eaters tend to rejoice with foods full of the first three basic flavors. Yet, how many diners do you see, pushing themselves back from the table, satisfyingly wiping their lips and say, "boy that was bitter." I mean, how many people just winced at the word bitter? Do not fear bitter. Two of the best things to consume are dominated by bitter flavors: chocolate and coffee. And lettuce, dressing tends to tame lettuce's bitterness, but underneath that dressing is some pretty bitter stuff. At Green City Market the other day, we picked up a bunch of mixed seasonal lettuces from Growing Power, the farm located in the midst of the city of Milwaukee. I was a bit skeptical of this lettuce because Growing Power had a lot of hothouse tomatoes. They insisted though, that the lettuce came from the ground. I believe them now.

    This was lettuce to tame your fear of bitterness. And of course, high advertisement for farmer's markets. I made my first big salad of the year. I love big salads. I take a bunch of items found in the kitchen, typically farmer's market produce and leftover meats, then chop it as well as my poor knife skills allow. I confess that what I love most about the big salad is just shoving all the minced stuff in my mouth like a squirrel and enjoying the way it interacts. In fact, I do not think I could eat a big salad in the company of others because the puffed out cheeks would be so impolite. OK, I am getting off subject. This big salad featured leftover pollo rostizado from Carnercia Jimenez (not the best I've had from them, too salty); Costco miracle bacon (i.e., their pre-cooked bacon that lasts for 8 months and is really, really good); Caputo's roasted red peppers, the Condiment Queen's famous tapenade (so good the chowhounditas demand it for breakfast, with goat cheese, at least once a week); and some crumbled blue cheese, with mustard vinaigrette. Oh, and that Growing Power Lettuce, at the end of the day, with all those things faded into the background. I mostly tasted the lettuce, a deliciously bitter lettuce. I finished that big salad, pushed myself away from the table, wiped my lips, smiled to no one, and said, boy was that bitter.

    Additional follow up: We made the Wilmont Milling polenta last night. It took a long time, much longer than promised, but at the end of the day it was worth the wait (if you like your polenta heavy, intense and tasting like corn.)
    Think Yiddish, Dress British - Advice of Evil Ronnie to me.
  • Post #12 - June 3rd, 2005, 8:23 am
    Post #12 - June 3rd, 2005, 8:23 am Post #12 - June 3rd, 2005, 8:23 am
    What's the word on the supply of farm fresh eggs at Green City Market? If I got there mid-morning on Saturday, would the egg supply be exhausted?

    Also, has anyone tried products from Anson Mills? Their grits and Carolina gold rice are the gold standard to me, and I wonder how the Wilmot Mills products compare.

    Thanks,
    J. Ro
  • Post #13 - June 4th, 2005, 11:17 pm
    Post #13 - June 4th, 2005, 11:17 pm Post #13 - June 4th, 2005, 11:17 pm
    Does the Green City Market at Clark and North Avenue have brats? Which vendor is carrying them? Do you know a name and phone number? I am looking to buy brats in the city and could use a resource. Thanks!
  • Post #14 - June 5th, 2005, 8:30 am
    Post #14 - June 5th, 2005, 8:30 am Post #14 - June 5th, 2005, 8:30 am
    mary60614 wrote:Does the Green City Market at Clark and North Avenue have brats? Which vendor is carrying them? Do you know a name and phone number? I am looking to buy brats in the city and could use a resource. Thanks!


    The bad news is the Wettstein's, who sell local organic beef, chicken, etc., are not making regular trips to the Green City Market (I do not know why). "Their space" is being manned by a farm called Osage Farms, another farmer from central Illinois. The GOOD news is, Osage Farms will bring you something ordered from the Wettstein's.

    So, call them at 309-467-6006 and put in an order. You can then pick it up at the Green City Market. I know it kills a certain amount of spontanity as well as a gee that would go good with this kinda thing. But it is still possible to get their brats.

    CAVEAT: I've tried their meat before (great), but never the brats.

    'NOTHER CAVEAT: This is all based on what I was told at the Osage Farm's stand. I have not tried it all.

    Rob
    Think Yiddish, Dress British - Advice of Evil Ronnie to me.
  • Post #15 - June 6th, 2005, 2:27 pm
    Post #15 - June 6th, 2005, 2:27 pm Post #15 - June 6th, 2005, 2:27 pm
    J. Ro wrote:What's the word on the supply of farm fresh eggs at Green City Market? If I got there mid-morning on Saturday, would the egg supply be exhausted?


    To answer my question for the good of the world, at 9:00 a.m. on Saturday, there were three vendors selling eggs, ranging in price from $3.00 to $4.00. Two scrambled and two fried since Saturday, and they are mm-mm good.

    Keep eating,
    J. Ro
  • Post #16 - May 17th, 2006, 10:23 am
    Post #16 - May 17th, 2006, 10:23 am Post #16 - May 17th, 2006, 10:23 am
    Green City opens for 2006

    Image

    Not all that many vendors yet, more bakers (Red Hen, Bleeding Heart), greenery and plants to grow than farm-fresh produce, the crowd likewise sparse and easygoing, but all in all, a pleasant harbinger of things to come. I bought, from Nichols, a Cherokee Purple tomato plant, we'll see what comes of that.

    Image

    Some things were going quick.

    Image

    Genuine purple asparagus... monster-sized, too.

    Image

    Can't wait for strawberries to go with.

    Got some eggs, and also swung by the Brunkow Cheese guy. Frankly his $10 blocks of heavily aged cheddar are, though very good, hard for me to justify. What's great though is his horseradish-flavored spreadable cheese. I enjoyed that all last fall, then ran out and bought some (Laack's) at Mars Cheese Castle which was one-dimensional cheese and waaaaaaay too much horseradish. Today I happily consigned it to the trash and replaced it with a new tub of the Brunkow stuff.
    Watch Sky Full of Bacon, the Chicago food HD podcast!
    New episode: Soil, Corn, Cows and Cheese
    Watch the Reader's James Beard Award-winning Key Ingredient here.
  • Post #17 - May 17th, 2006, 11:24 am
    Post #17 - May 17th, 2006, 11:24 am Post #17 - May 17th, 2006, 11:24 am
    Mike G wrote:[Genuine purple asparagus... monster-sized, too.


    Mike, speaking of asparagus and strawberries, here is something which your boys might enjoy making:

    "Strawberry & Rhubarb Almond Yoghurt Ice Lollies" @ Nordljus

    E.M.

    EDIT: I MEANT RHUBARB, NOT ASPARAGUS!!!
    Last edited by Erik M. on May 17th, 2006, 7:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #18 - May 17th, 2006, 2:49 pm
    Post #18 - May 17th, 2006, 2:49 pm Post #18 - May 17th, 2006, 2:49 pm
    I went today as well, and wondered if anyone else from here had gone.
    We arrived later than Mike-about 11:30. We came with a stroller, and I never saw so many other ones in such a small space before! :) It was really crowded the whole time we were there.
    Image

    There was a stand selling dried fruit stuff and apple cider($5/gal), which we tried a sample of. Tasted like I was drinking a fresh whole apple- really sweet. By the time I went back to actually buy some, they were sold out. :cry: They said they'll be all over though, including at the Sears Tower Farmers Market in 2 weeks, which is convenient for me. :D

    We ended up buying a parsnip($2/lb) and a big bunch of chives($1.50!!) from a Virginia organic farm. They had a lot of good deals, but had run out of about 8 different things already.
    ImageImage

    From the mushroom stand, I bought a 1/2 lb. of the oyster variety($10/lb). They had button, portabella, and crimini for $4/lb or $10/3 lbs. The morels had been around $32/lb. but sold out earlier.
    Image

    The Red Hen stand didn't look very enticing to me. $7 for a loaf of Ciabatta seems too steep. I bought a loaf yesterday at Federal Plaza. It looked better than theirs and cost $3. Neither one had a very strong crust. Isn't that a mark of really good bread?

    I also tried an organic burger($7) from a stand. It was very fresh, but free range/organic hamburger always tastes dry to me, and has hard things in it. I did order it medium, though. My hubby got a mushroom, tomato, and sharp cheddar panini($7.50). It was teeny tiny, and nothing special. We should have saved our money and gone home to cook the produce we bought.

    I've never cooked parsnip before, so I think I will cut it up and pan roast it tonight. Still deciding what to do with the mushrooms... I'm excited!
  • Post #19 - May 17th, 2006, 3:06 pm
    Post #19 - May 17th, 2006, 3:06 pm Post #19 - May 17th, 2006, 3:06 pm
    bnowell724 wrote:I went today as well, and wondered if anyone else from here had gone.


    The Condiment Queen and I went too. :)

    Now, I have to say, that the fact that it took me over an hour to go from Damen and North to actually shopping at the market, including having to finally fork over $4 for 1 hour of parking did not contribute to a fuzzy shopping feeling today. :(

    And you know, maybe I'm spoiled, maybe my expectations were too high, maybe it was the parking, but I was not blown away today. It's not that the market is bad. Hardly. It's very (very) good, but I was expecting great and I was especially expecting improvements, building on last year's market. What I found was mostly stasis, and to me, that made it seem going backward. Moreover, with all the attendant hassles, it makes me wonder if it is worth it.

    There were two new meat vendors, two new cheese vendors, but it seemed at the expense of last year's meat and cheese vendors. No Capriole, no Wettstein's. We were especially keen on getting locally milled grains, our primary raison d'etre for the visit, only to learn he was only gonna be there on Saturday's only. Still, like I say, it's foodie heaven.

    Having survived on so many keepers, then greenhouse stuff, it was great to see actual, outta the ground, seasonal produce, well at least asparagus. We too got those parsnips, which should be very sweet having been left in the ground during the winter. That farm, BTW is Green Acres, from Indiana, not Virginia. We also loved the stuff at Seedlings, and bought a jar of apple butter--we wanted the pear butter, but it was sold out.

    There are so many farmer's markets around, the Green City is one of the better ones, but I am gonna make the effort to see how others stack up too.
    Think Yiddish, Dress British - Advice of Evil Ronnie to me.
  • Post #20 - May 17th, 2006, 3:33 pm
    Post #20 - May 17th, 2006, 3:33 pm Post #20 - May 17th, 2006, 3:33 pm
    That farm, BTW is Green Acres, from Indiana, not Virginia.

    Oh yeah,oops, got it mixed up. They both have the 'ia' thing goin on.
    I was most impressed by them- they quality of what I saw, and the good deals on it.

    There are so many farmer's markets around, the Green City is one of the better ones, but I am gonna make the effort to see how others stack up too.

    There are three in the loop alone! I'm gonna see what's at Daley Plaza tomorrow. The seedling people named about 5 different ones I've never heard of that they are going to be at. They mentioned that the Wicker Park Market is really nice.
  • Post #21 - May 17th, 2006, 5:18 pm
    Post #21 - May 17th, 2006, 5:18 pm Post #21 - May 17th, 2006, 5:18 pm
    bnowell724 wrote:They mentioned that the Wicker Park Market is really nice.


    Where is the Wicker Park market again ? By the Pritzker School ? When does it start ?
  • Post #22 - May 17th, 2006, 5:31 pm
    Post #22 - May 17th, 2006, 5:31 pm Post #22 - May 17th, 2006, 5:31 pm
    VI-- Judge it in a month, I think many vendors who will be there later aren't yet, and the ones who were there weren't showing what their displays will look like then-- e.g., Nichols normally has dozens of bins of tomatoes, potatoes, etc. once the growing season is really going. Overall, the selection seemed to be a little more interesting than last year-- I don't think there was really a pork guy before, just beef, but now there is. (Parking is a major problem, though. I'd have bought three tomato plants for $10 instead of 1 for $4, but I had no way to get them to my car.) (And I miss Snooklefriz ice cream.)

    Bnowell-- try the hamburger medium-rare next time. It's usually really good, plus it's cool that they use stuff from other vendors on it.

    Image
    (Photo taken last May.)
    Watch Sky Full of Bacon, the Chicago food HD podcast!
    New episode: Soil, Corn, Cows and Cheese
    Watch the Reader's James Beard Award-winning Key Ingredient here.
  • Post #23 - May 17th, 2006, 6:27 pm
    Post #23 - May 17th, 2006, 6:27 pm Post #23 - May 17th, 2006, 6:27 pm
    Where is the Wicker Park market again ? By the Pritzker School ? When does it start ?

    http://www.cityofchicago.org says it starts June 4, and will be on Sundays from 7am-2pm
  • Post #24 - June 11th, 2014, 7:27 pm
    Post #24 - June 11th, 2014, 7:27 pm Post #24 - June 11th, 2014, 7:27 pm
    Chicago's Green City Market, the popular organic and natural foods farmers market in Lincoln Park, is planning an outpost in the Fulton Market area, a spokesman for the City of Chicago's Department of Planning and Development confirmed.

    Green City, which features fresh produce and artisanal foods from regional sources on Wednesday and Saturday mornings, will invite produce vendors to sell their goods at a new venue in the heart of one of the hippest and fastest-growing restaurant hubs in the city. That market could open as soon as mid-July, but the specific spot hasn't been decided. Organizers are coordinating details with several city departments and local business groups.

    The new venue will be a chef-focused market with only raw produce for sale, the spokesman confirmed. No prepared foods will be sold as they are at the Lincoln Park market.
    http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20140611/NEWS07/140619949/green-city-market-outpost-coming-to-fulton-market
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #25 - November 6th, 2014, 2:16 pm
    Post #25 - November 6th, 2014, 2:16 pm Post #25 - November 6th, 2014, 2:16 pm
    Green City Market's fundraiser, A (Mostly) Veggie Affair: Cheat on Meat or Go Whole Beast!, is coming up on November 13th at Chop Shop/First Ward. I'm bummed I cannot be there (concert tix that night) because it looks to be a great event . . .

    A (MOSTLY) VEGGIE AFFAIR: CHEAT ON MEAT OR GO WHOLE BEAST!
    On Thursday, November 13, the Green City Market Junior Board will present its ever-so-local and seasonal fall fundraiser, A (Mostly) Veggie Affair: Cheat on Meat or Go Whole Beast!, at Wicker Park's Chop Shop & The 1st Ward (2033 W. North Ave.) from 7 to 10pm. Throughout the evening, guests will enjoy a walk-around stationed tasting, featuring local chefs' all-vegetable dishes made with Green City Market vendor produce. Complimenting the array of delicious vegetarian fare, Junior Board member chefs Jared Batson, Scott Manley and Eric Mansavage will also prepare three whole pigs "Three Little Pigs-style," incorporating straw, wood and bricks both in their cooking methods and for creative inspiration. With all the great local food on offer, attendees will be able to Cheat on Meat or Go Whole Beast!

    The current chef line-up (with additional names to be added) includes:
    Jared Batson (The Nomad Food Company)
    Abe Conlon and Adrienne Lo (Fat Rice)
    Beverly Kim and John Clark (Parachute)
    Kim Leali (Nico Osteria)
    Scott Manley (Table Donkey and Stick)
    Eric Mansavage (Farmhouse)
    Isaac Magaña (XOCO Wicker Park)
    Bruce Sherman (North Pond)
    Jared Van Camp (Nellcote/RM Champagne Salon/Old Town Social/Leghorn/Owen + Alchemy)
    Lee Wolen (Boka)
    Chop Shop

    The fundraiser will also enlist five of the city's most talented bartenders, who will pour creative libations featuring Green City Market product. In addition, local craft beer from Junior Board member Jared Rouben's Moody Tongue Brewing Company and Goose Island Brewpub will be on offer, along with bottled cocktails from Charles Joly's Crafthouse brand. The five featured bartenders will include:
    Will Duncan (Punch House)
    Robby Haynes & Hank Prendergast (Analogue)
    Charles Joly (Aviary/Crafthouse/World's Best Bartender)
    Wade McElroy & Jeff Donahue (Sportsman's Club)
    Danny Shapiro (Scofflaw)

    Seasonal desserts will be provided by Stan's Donuts & Coffee, Labriola Bakery Café and Green City Market vendor Seasons Soda.

    There's also a silent auction (now taking place online) with some pretty cool items. If you're a fan of the Green City Market and its mission, participating in this event and the auction are great ways to support what they're doing.

    =R=
    Gardening is a bloodsport --Meghan Kleeman

    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #26 - March 30th, 2015, 12:07 pm
    Post #26 - March 30th, 2015, 12:07 pm Post #26 - March 30th, 2015, 12:07 pm
    America's top chefs will converge on the Green City Market on its opening day this spring.

    In honor of the 2015 James Beard Foundation Awards, which will take place in Chicago for the first time this year, visiting chefs will gather at the city's premier farmers market.

    The chefs will be at the market May 2 to kick off Green City's 17th season.

    http://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20150330 ... ity-market
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #27 - June 10th, 2015, 6:30 pm
    Post #27 - June 10th, 2015, 6:30 pm Post #27 - June 10th, 2015, 6:30 pm
    Green City Market will set up shop in a lot behind Soho House Chicago the second Sunday of every month starting this week and running through Oct. 11.

    http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/ ... soho-house
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #28 - March 29th, 2017, 1:48 pm
    Post #28 - March 29th, 2017, 1:48 pm Post #28 - March 29th, 2017, 1:48 pm
    When Rizzo, Bryant and Schwarber aren't at Wrigley Field this summer, kohlrabi, kale and corn will be. On non-game-day Thursdays, Green City Market will operate a farmers market in The Park at Wrigley, the new, open-air entertainment space that will debut April 10 at 3637 N. Clark St., adjacent to Wrigley Field.

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/dining/ct ... story.html
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #29 - March 29th, 2017, 3:13 pm
    Post #29 - March 29th, 2017, 3:13 pm Post #29 - March 29th, 2017, 3:13 pm
    Dave148 wrote:
    When Rizzo, Bryant and Schwarber aren't at Wrigley Field this summer, kohlrabi, kale and corn will be. On non-game-day Thursdays, Green City Market will operate a farmers market in The Park at Wrigley, the new, open-air entertainment space that will debut April 10 at 3637 N. Clark St., adjacent to Wrigley Field.

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/dining/ct ... story.html


    Tribune has a paywall.

    The time of the Market at Wriggley will be 4pm-8pm on Thursday. The first Thursday will be June 15th according the Green City Market website so check first.
    http://www.greencitymarket.org/markets/

    Green City Market at the Park
    Green City Market at the Park at Wrigley operates June through October from 4-8 p.m. on the following Thursday evenings:

    June: 15, 22 & 29
    July 6, 13, 20 & 27
    August 10 & 24
    September 7, 21 & 28
    October 5, 12, 19 & 26 (pending MLB post season)
    Green City Market at the Park is located at 3637 N. Clark Street, adjacent to Wrigley Field.
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #30 - June 26th, 2017, 7:58 am
    Post #30 - June 26th, 2017, 7:58 am Post #30 - June 26th, 2017, 7:58 am
    Bronzeville residents may notice something new under the shadows of the Green Line at 51st Street: Boxville, Chicago's first mall built from shipping containers, and home to the first South Side outpost of Lincoln Park farmers market Green City Market, opens today.

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/dining/ct ... story.html
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny

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