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Serrated Steak Knives in Restaurants

Serrated Steak Knives in Restaurants
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  • Post #31 - September 30th, 2018, 5:53 pm
    Post #31 - September 30th, 2018, 5:53 pm Post #31 - September 30th, 2018, 5:53 pm
    I don't presume to be knowledgeable enough to know what's a "real" Laguiole knife and what's not. The Jean Dubost website provides a lot of detail about their history of fabricating Laguiole knives in Thiers, and I personally would be inclined to consider a certified Jean Dubost Laguiole knife an authentic Laguiole knife. On the other hand, that article I linked to states that a serrated knife is by definition not a Laguiole knife (which makes sense if you think of Laguiole as a style of knife rather than an indicator of origin). But then, a corkscrew is by that definition not a Laguiole knife either, although I'd be glad to buy one made by Jean Dubost if I had a chance.

    I bought my Laguiole knife from what appeared to me to be a professional knife vendor at the open-air market in Beaune, and I'd like to think it was locally and traditionally made, but there's no way I can know for sure. It's a great-quality knife, in any case, and I particularly love using it when I eat steak.

    I will say that if I were a restaurateur, I don't think I'd put "authentic" Laguiole knives out on the tables unless I had so much extra money I didn't care about them walking off.

    I wish I hadn't passed on a chance to pick up an Opinel knife or two when I was in France. They're less expensive than Laguioles, more utilitarian, so it wasn't the cost that put me off; I was just distracted. Opinel knives have quite the loyal following, I subsequently learned, and I'd be glad to have one or more on hand. Yes, I could get one online, but I'd rather have one as a travel souvenir. Oh well, next trip.

    No question, though; French-made Laguiole/Laguiole-style knives are beautiful and a pleasure to use.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #32 - October 13th, 2018, 8:33 am
    Post #32 - October 13th, 2018, 8:33 am Post #32 - October 13th, 2018, 8:33 am
    Picked up a strip steak for the bride and a chicken breast for me from Joseph's Finest Meats. She loved the steak, she is a beef lover and Joseph's products are impeccable. I was, unusual for me, not in the mood for steak and the boneless skin-on chicken breast was meaty and glowing with Eat-Me goodness, the best looking chicken breast I have ever seen, and not in a distinction without a difference fashion.

    Joseph's uses Bell & Evans, not a know your farmer boutique bird, and it was absolutely delicious. Lightly dredged in spiced flour, pan fried in olive oil and finished with butter/lemon juice. Best meaty flavorful juicy chicken breast I ever ate, I plan on buying more.

    No pic of the chicken breast, it did not occur to me to take a picture until I was mostly done. Brides steak was cut with an Opinel #9.

    IMG_7134.jpg Strip Steak / Opinel #9
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #33 - October 13th, 2018, 2:24 pm
    Post #33 - October 13th, 2018, 2:24 pm Post #33 - October 13th, 2018, 2:24 pm
    If you really like chicken breast(?!?), Mariano's sells Bell & Evans products. As much as I like Joseph's for beef, you can probably save some serious $$ over buying chicken breast at Joseph's.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #34 - October 13th, 2018, 3:10 pm
    Post #34 - October 13th, 2018, 3:10 pm Post #34 - October 13th, 2018, 3:10 pm
    G Wiv wrote:Picked up a strip steak for the bride and a chicken breast for me

    WTF?! Has the world gone insane?! :lol:

    =R=
    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #35 - October 13th, 2018, 3:16 pm
    Post #35 - October 13th, 2018, 3:16 pm Post #35 - October 13th, 2018, 3:16 pm
    ...and behold there was a weeping and a wailing and a gnashing of teeth.

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #36 - October 14th, 2018, 8:34 am
    Post #36 - October 14th, 2018, 8:34 am Post #36 - October 14th, 2018, 8:34 am
    stevez wrote:If you really like chicken breast(?!?), Mariano's sells Bell & Evans products.
    Mariano's air-chilled bone-in skin-on chicken thighs are a staple and I can honestly say they don't hold a candle to the scrumptious (yep, I actually used the word scrumptious) deliciousness of aforementioned breast from Joseph's. May have been an anomaly, may have been the moon/tide/my mood but I could have just as easily posted in ~Best~ thread as here.
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #37 - October 14th, 2018, 9:14 am
    Post #37 - October 14th, 2018, 9:14 am Post #37 - October 14th, 2018, 9:14 am
    G Wiv wrote:
    stevez wrote:If you really like chicken breast(?!?), Mariano's sells Bell & Evans products.
    Mariano's air-chilled bone-in skin-on chicken thighs are a staple and I can honestly say they don't hold a candle to the scrumptious (yep, I actually used the word scrumptious) deliciousness of aforementioned breast from Joseph's. May have been an anomaly, may have been the moon/tide/my mood but I could have just as easily posted in ~Best~ thread as here.


    They keep the Bell & Evens stuff off to the side. I don't think their regular air chilled chicken parts are B & E.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #38 - October 14th, 2018, 9:42 am
    Post #38 - October 14th, 2018, 9:42 am Post #38 - October 14th, 2018, 9:42 am
    stevez wrote:They keep the Bell & Evens stuff off to the side. I don't think their regular air chilled chicken parts are B & E.
    I wasn't clear in the least, and thanks.

    I've bought Bell & Evans chickens from Mariano's and other grocery stores, whole birds, parts etc. Neither the Mariano's air-chilled, which I typically prefer to Bell & Evans, or the B & E I've had in the past have equaled the glorious Carol Doda chicken breast from Joseph's. I'll try to go back to Joseph's later next week, ask a few questions, buy some chicken plus steak & sausage and report back.
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #39 - October 31st, 2018, 6:29 pm
    Post #39 - October 31st, 2018, 6:29 pm Post #39 - October 31st, 2018, 6:29 pm
    Hard target search for the set of Laguiole Knives Ellen bought at Gump's San Francisco 20+ years ago. First time using tonight with wonderful $5 Wednesday special Butcher & Larder pork chops.

    BLPost1.jpg Butcher & Larder pork chop, wild rice w/dried cranberry and crunchy vinegar tart salad to cut richness.
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #40 - October 31st, 2018, 6:44 pm
    Post #40 - October 31st, 2018, 6:44 pm Post #40 - October 31st, 2018, 6:44 pm
    Lovely eats, Gary! Is that knife a folder??

    Last Laguiole knife I bought was in a fishing tackle shoppe in Concarneau, in Brittany. Hard core shoppe, hard core knife!

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #41 - October 31st, 2018, 6:52 pm
    Post #41 - October 31st, 2018, 6:52 pm Post #41 - October 31st, 2018, 6:52 pm
    Geo wrote:Lovely eats, Gary! Is that knife a folder??

    Not a folder, part of a steak knife set Ellen bought decades ago. I have a Laguiole folder I bought in France a decade ago, also a wonderful knife.
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #42 - October 31st, 2018, 6:57 pm
    Post #42 - October 31st, 2018, 6:57 pm Post #42 - October 31st, 2018, 6:57 pm
    HI,

    I was really unaware of this issue with serrated steak knives. I happened to read an article in the October issue of Esquire. There was a brief article on steak houses with comments about steak knives.

    I just never thought about this and now twice in a short period is this highlighted.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #43 - November 3rd, 2018, 9:23 am
    Post #43 - November 3rd, 2018, 9:23 am Post #43 - November 3rd, 2018, 9:23 am
    Bring Back the Personal Eating Knife!

    In Medieval Europe, No Outfit Was Complete Without a Personal Eating Knife.

    Gastro Obscura wrote:Tucked away in a sheath and strung to one’s belt, a personal dagger-like knife was a quotidian accessory to the medieval European outfit. Though it could be used as a defensive weapon, it’s primary purpose was as an eating utensil. One would just as soon leave the house without shoes as walk around without a knife strung from the girdle.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #44 - November 3rd, 2018, 8:39 pm
    Post #44 - November 3rd, 2018, 8:39 pm Post #44 - November 3rd, 2018, 8:39 pm
    I have a set of Laguiole Steak Knives ( I am assuming that they are authentic)
    and a Cutco bread knife (don't ask it was all about the sales person) the remainder of my knives are Wusthof which I have accumulated over the years replacing my initial purchase of a set of Chicago Cutlery Knives decades ago. One of my Wusthof knives is labeled a Gourmet Super Slicer which has a 10 inch blade that is neither smooth nor serrated as described in the above posts but has rounded offset serrations. This is my go to knife for slicing large cuts of meat as well as steaks to be shared including London Broil (Flank Steak). I would like to post a pic of this knife, but even with an advanced degree I have not been able to figure out how to post photos.
    Why does man kill? He kills for food. And not only food: frequently there must be a beverage.
    Woody Allen
  • Post #45 - November 20th, 2018, 10:35 pm
    Post #45 - November 20th, 2018, 10:35 pm Post #45 - November 20th, 2018, 10:35 pm
    Hardly the highlight from our excellent meal at Vie tonight but an easy-enough image to pick off the top off the pile . . .

    Image
    Non-serrated steak knife (of course) at Vie Restaurant - 18.1120

    =R=

    Vie Restaurant
    4471 Lawn Ave
    Western Springs, IL 60558
    (708) 246-2082
    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #46 - November 21st, 2018, 3:33 am
    Post #46 - November 21st, 2018, 3:33 am Post #46 - November 21st, 2018, 3:33 am
    Marshall K wrote:One of my Wusthof knives is labeled a Gourmet Super Slicer which has a 10 inch blade that is neither smooth nor serrated as described in the above posts but has rounded offset serrations

    Not sure which of these you mean, pictures below.

    I'm not much of a fan of either, though I own a Victorinox Fibrox Granton Slicer.

    In my opinion granton edges don't do much, though some like them and the scallops/hollows are purported to reduce friction and make it easier to carve even slices. The other pictured knife still has spaces between cutting edges which, in my opinion, promote shredding.

    W1.jpg Knife #1

    W2.jpg Knife #2, Granton Edge


    My preferred way to slice meat, though not always possible, is a single draw cut with a sharp non serrated blade.

    YMMV
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #47 - November 23rd, 2018, 6:19 pm
    Post #47 - November 23rd, 2018, 6:19 pm Post #47 - November 23rd, 2018, 6:19 pm
    G Wiv wrote:
    Marshall K wrote:One of my Wusthof knives is labeled a Gourmet Super Slicer which has a 10 inch blade that is neither smooth nor serrated as described in the above posts but has rounded offset serrations

    Not sure which of these you mean, pictures below.

    I'm not much of a fan of either, though I own a Victorinox Fibrox Granton Slicer.

    In my opinion granton edges don't do much, though some like them and the scallops/hollows are purported to reduce friction and make it easier to carve even slices. The other pictured knife still has spaces between cutting edges which, in my opinion, promote shredding.

    W1.jpg

    W2.jpg


    My preferred way to slice meat, though not always possible, is a single draw cut with a sharp non serrated blade.

    YMMV

    My knife is indeed # 1, Thank you for posting Gary
    Why does man kill? He kills for food. And not only food: frequently there must be a beverage.
    Woody Allen
  • Post #48 - November 24th, 2018, 1:02 pm
    Post #48 - November 24th, 2018, 1:02 pm Post #48 - November 24th, 2018, 1:02 pm
    I took the kids to Fogo De Chao and was really surprised at the low quality of the knives - I'm a convert - brining my own from now on.
  • Post #49 - November 24th, 2018, 2:11 pm
    Post #49 - November 24th, 2018, 2:11 pm Post #49 - November 24th, 2018, 2:11 pm
    zoid wrote:I'm a convert - brining my own from now on.

    Do they come out more tender and flavorful after the brine?
  • Post #50 - November 25th, 2018, 1:47 pm
    Post #50 - November 25th, 2018, 1:47 pm Post #50 - November 25th, 2018, 1:47 pm
    As seen recently at Cafe Marie-Jeanne . . .

    Image
    Laguiole Steak Knife with Micro Serrations

    =R=
    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #51 - December 8th, 2018, 4:39 pm
    Post #51 - December 8th, 2018, 4:39 pm Post #51 - December 8th, 2018, 4:39 pm
    I've decided to bite the bullet - can anyone recommend a folding knife or one that cones with a sheath/case?
  • Post #52 - December 9th, 2018, 9:13 am
    Post #52 - December 9th, 2018, 9:13 am Post #52 - December 9th, 2018, 9:13 am
    zoid wrote:I've decided to bite the bullet - can anyone recommend a folding knife or one that cones with a sheath/case?
    Pocket knives are a pretty deep rabbit hole. I'm a fan of many types, have had one in my pocket since I was a 7-year-old member of Indian Guides, Milwaukee area circa 1902.

    For starters I suggest Sypderco (lock) or Great Eastern Cutlery (slip joint). Price range from cents to dollar$$$. If you want something that lasts don't cheap out, I have/carry pocket knives that are well past drinking age and just getting broken in.

    https://www.knivesshipfree.com/great-eastern-cutlery/
    https://www.bladehq.com/cat--All-Spyderco--109

    KnivesRandom1.jpg Random G Wiv pocket knives.
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #53 - December 9th, 2018, 11:05 am
    Post #53 - December 9th, 2018, 11:05 am Post #53 - December 9th, 2018, 11:05 am
    Hi,

    When you fly, do you leave your knife in your luggage?

    I remember when all men carried a small pocket knife for incidental needs. I have a sense that is not happening with the younger generation.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #54 - December 9th, 2018, 11:46 am
    Post #54 - December 9th, 2018, 11:46 am Post #54 - December 9th, 2018, 11:46 am
    Cathy2 wrote:When you fly, do you leave your knife in your luggage?
    Is that a trick question or do you think TSA gives me special dispensation because I know C2?
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #55 - December 10th, 2018, 3:19 pm
    Post #55 - December 10th, 2018, 3:19 pm Post #55 - December 10th, 2018, 3:19 pm
    Carrying a pocketknife is still very much a thing with the younger generation(s), if the posts on Everyday Carry-type sites are any indication.

    The TSA used to allow knife blades up to a certain length, up to 3" at one point, I thought, and then somewhat less than 2.5", but what appear to be the current rules indicate no blades of any length are allowed in carry-on luggage, except "plastic or round bladed butter knives." Knives in checked baggage "should be sheathed or securely wrapped to prevent injury to baggage handlers and inspectors."

    I used to get little pocket knives often as speakers' gifts at conferences and training courses. Even though these had pretty short blades, it would be hit or miss whether a particular TSA agent would allow one through. I usually check a bag, so I just had to remember to put the knife in the bag to be checked, or give it away before I got to the airport. I remember once at the Denver airport seeing a large, clear plastic garbage can filled with hundreds of pocket knives that people had been told they couldn't take through security.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #56 - December 10th, 2018, 4:33 pm
    Post #56 - December 10th, 2018, 4:33 pm Post #56 - December 10th, 2018, 4:33 pm
    You might be able to get airport-confiscated knives back if you're willing to sort through odd lots. TSA auctions them off periodically.

    Note that I picked up a small folding knife for 4€ at the Rastro flea market in Madrid, and kept it in my backpack for slicing chorizo and cheese. The only museum or tourist site that had any issue was Sagrada Familia, and they tagged it and gave me a claim check.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #57 - December 10th, 2018, 5:10 pm
    Post #57 - December 10th, 2018, 5:10 pm Post #57 - December 10th, 2018, 5:10 pm
    JoelF wrote:Note that I picked up a small folding knife for 4€ at the Rastro flea market in Madrid, and kept it in my backpack for slicing chorizo and cheese. The only museum or tourist site that had any issue was Sagrada Familia, and they tagged it and gave me a claim check.
    Joel, I've done that as well, picked up a pocket knife at my destination then gifted it when I left.

    I've only had one pocket knife taken away, a few years ago in Israel at the Wailing Wall. It never occurred to me there would be a magnetometer at the entrance and I set it off when I went through. In my pocket I had a Spyderco Delica circa early 1990's with less than 3" blade. The guard stopped me, called a supervisor, who called the city police, who brought in a couple of soldiers with automatic weapons. I was with a group, including my wife, but had lagged behind as it was 110° in the shade and was moving slow.

    They were polite but each subsequent group asked why I needed a knife, I said ostensibly the same thing as you mention, cutting sausage, cheese, string etc. What was funny is that when the military supervisor noticed I was from Chicago, he had my drivers license in hand, he smiled, said Chicago a few times while pointing at me for the benefit of his colleagues. This diffused the situation, they kept the knife, which I had carried on and off for multiple decades, but at that point I was fine with any outcome that did not land me in prison. :)

    My bride wondered where the heck I was and the tour guide, when I told him the story, said he typically mentions no pocket knifes of any type at that venue but did not think anyone in our group had one so did not.

    I picked up a pocket knife the next day and gifted it to our tour guide when we flew home. He was quite pleased.
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #58 - December 10th, 2018, 6:16 pm
    Post #58 - December 10th, 2018, 6:16 pm Post #58 - December 10th, 2018, 6:16 pm
    JoelF wrote:You might be able to get airport-confiscated knives back if you're willing to sort through odd lots. TSA auctions them off periodically.

    Wow, those are staggering quantities of Swiss Army knives you can buy from TSA for $500 or more a box.

    But look what else you can get, for a fraction of the cost!
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #59 - December 10th, 2018, 10:01 pm
    Post #59 - December 10th, 2018, 10:01 pm Post #59 - December 10th, 2018, 10:01 pm
    The TSA used to allow knife blades up to a certain length, up to 3" at one point, I thought, and then somewhat less than 2.5", but what appear to be the current rules indicate no blades of any length are allowed in carry-on luggage, except "plastic or round bladed butter knives." Knives in checked baggage "should be sheathed or securely wrapped to prevent injury to baggage handlers and inspectors."


    I carry a pocket knife - a very small Swiss Army - with me every day. It's cheap enough that I don't mind losing it. On the other hand, every single time I've checked one they've disappeared en route and in their place a little tag notifying me that TSA inspected my luggage - correlation doesn't equal casuation, but it makes you wonder. Maybe baggage inspection folks know they are small, and cheap enough, to swipe. It's possible more expensive-looking knives would be left alone. As a result though, I've stopped attempting to travel with one.
  • Post #60 - Yesterday, 1:37 am
    Post #60 - Yesterday, 1:37 am Post #60 - Yesterday, 1:37 am
    bobbywal wrote:On the other hand, every single time I've checked one they've disappeared en route and in their place a little tag notifying me that TSA inspected my luggage - correlation doesn't equal casuation, but it makes you wonder.
    I've traveled with knives, both pocket and chef knives, in my luggage for decades never had one stolen. One time I thought a pocket knife had been taken from my luggage but I found it a year later wedged under an insert in my bag.
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow

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