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What to do with chopped baby back rib pieces?

What to do with chopped baby back rib pieces?
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  • What to do with chopped baby back rib pieces?

    Post #1 - January 15th, 2019, 2:52 pm
    Post #1 - January 15th, 2019, 2:52 pm Post #1 - January 15th, 2019, 2:52 pm
    I'm looking for inspiration.
    Joong Boo had pieces of baby backs cheap on Sunday, and I thought I could do things similar to what I do with beef short ribs -- similar bone/fat/connective tissue levels. But the pieces are a bit small for fork-and-knife. Something less wet but sticky could be good.

    Ideas? Bonus challenge: Something that I could put up now and be done by 6? (actually have more time than that, Sue is out this evening)
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #2 - January 15th, 2019, 2:57 pm
    Post #2 - January 15th, 2019, 2:57 pm Post #2 - January 15th, 2019, 2:57 pm
    make Mac and cheese and put the pieces in.
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #3 - January 15th, 2019, 2:59 pm
    Post #3 - January 15th, 2019, 2:59 pm Post #3 - January 15th, 2019, 2:59 pm
    First thought was to put it in a pot of Sunday gravy
  • Post #4 - January 15th, 2019, 3:07 pm
    Post #4 - January 15th, 2019, 3:07 pm Post #4 - January 15th, 2019, 3:07 pm
    toria wrote:make Mac and cheese and put the pieces in.

    Maybe once cooked, but I think they'd end up undercooked and making the mac a greasy mess.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #5 - January 15th, 2019, 3:37 pm
    Post #5 - January 15th, 2019, 3:37 pm Post #5 - January 15th, 2019, 3:37 pm
    Sous vide over noodles, with garlic simmered gently in the rendered fat as the sauce.
  • Post #6 - January 15th, 2019, 5:11 pm
    Post #6 - January 15th, 2019, 5:11 pm Post #6 - January 15th, 2019, 5:11 pm
    My first thought was a pork in salsa verde, but it doesn't fit your "less wet." I have a friend who does pork spine this way. Yes, messy to eat, but delicious.

    Here's a recipe which calls for 2-inch rib pieces. It also calls for purslane, but the version I've had doesn't have it.
  • Post #7 - January 15th, 2019, 6:01 pm
    Post #7 - January 15th, 2019, 6:01 pm Post #7 - January 15th, 2019, 6:01 pm
    Fried rice?
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"

    As Carl Sagan once said, to make an apple pie truly from scratch, you must first invent the universe. And sometimes I just don't have the time and energy to invent the universe. So I figure it's okay to buy some stuff.
  • Post #8 - January 15th, 2019, 6:09 pm
    Post #8 - January 15th, 2019, 6:09 pm Post #8 - January 15th, 2019, 6:09 pm
    Shoot didn't see the wet part.

    I've been messing w pork bulgogi marinade as the seasoning component of ribs instead of a rub and/or bbq sauce.

    You could baste the individual ribs w that and slow roast and finish on the grill or broiler.
  • Post #9 - January 16th, 2019, 10:59 am
    Post #9 - January 16th, 2019, 10:59 am Post #9 - January 16th, 2019, 10:59 am
    Too late for last night...

    But, I think I'd cook them off by whatever method I have at hand. You could throw them in the slow cooker, you could roast them off in the oven on a baking sheet, etc. The goal would be to get them to the "fall off the bone" phase.

    With that done, the fat should be rendered off and deboning should be easy.

    Then just cook them up with whatever sauce you like - anything from BBQ to more Asian to whatever. From there you have pulled pork on buns, or the Mac & Cheese idea - there's a place we go to that serves a BBQ Mac & Cheese that's like crack.

    Or, skip the saucing stage and use it as protein in whatever you like - asian stir fry would be good, you could use them as omelet filling, in a casserole (does anyone still make those, I sort of miss them). My mother used to do one with left over pork, cheese, white sauce (actually cream of mushroom soup, but I've moved on), noodles and pimento peppers that I now have a hankering for.
  • Post #10 - January 18th, 2019, 2:40 pm
    Post #10 - January 18th, 2019, 2:40 pm Post #10 - January 18th, 2019, 2:40 pm
    What I did with them:
    Step 1: Braise
    In a slow cooker, put about 10 baby carrot sticks, half an onion sliced, six cloves garlic, two inches of ginger rough-chopped, quarter cup soy sauce, the same mirin, black pepper, and 2 lbs of the riblets. Cover with stock (I had a pint container labeled "pork chicken stock" in the freezer). I'd probably use less stock next time, it ended up with a lot of liquid. Slow cook alternating high and low for 5 hours to keep it at a simmer (I've never found a slow cooker that doesn't overboil on high, and or comes to a simmer at low).

    Step 2: Reduce liquid
    Remove the tender ribs, blend everything else with the boat motor to a smooth liquid. Add a half-cup brown sugar (I'd probably use less if I had less liquid), a half-teaspoon cayenne, large dash cumin, salt to taste, and boil down to a syrupy texture. Preheat broiler and put foil on a baking sheet.

    Step 3: Coat and broil
    Toss the ribs in the sauce, spread out on the pan and broil until dry-ish and browning.
    Eat alongside a nice green salad with ginger dressing.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #11 - January 25th, 2019, 7:11 pm
    Post #11 - January 25th, 2019, 7:11 pm Post #11 - January 25th, 2019, 7:11 pm
    JoelF wrote:What I did with them:
    Step 1: Braise
    In a slow cooker, put about 10 baby carrot sticks, half an onion sliced, six cloves garlic, two inches of ginger rough-chopped, quarter cup soy sauce, the same mirin, black pepper, and 2 lbs of the riblets. Cover with stock (I had a pint container labeled "pork chicken stock" in the freezer). I'd probably use less stock next time, it ended up with a lot of liquid. Slow cook alternating high and low for 5 hours to keep it at a simmer (I've never found a slow cooker that doesn't overboil on high, and or comes to a simmer at low).

    Step 2: Reduce liquid
    Remove the tender ribs, blend everything else with the boat motor to a smooth liquid. Add a half-cup brown sugar (I'd probably use less if I had less liquid), a half-teaspoon cayenne, large dash cumin, salt to taste, and boil down to a syrupy texture. Preheat broiler and put foil on a baking sheet.

    Step 3: Coat and broil
    Toss the ribs in the sauce, spread out on the pan and broil until dry-ish and browning.
    Eat alongside a nice green salad with ginger dressing.


    Hi, your meal sounds very good. I'll add another suggestion just for general reference. Chopped up pork ribs to me says Chinese rib soup - this is a simple but tasty clear broth seasoned mostly with ginger and white pepper. First, briefly blanch your ribs and pour off the water to get rid of the cloudy proteins. Then, add enough chicken stock to cover the riblets and bring to a simmer. Slice a knob of ginger into thin slivers and toss it in, along with a handful of shiitakes, and a couple handfuls of peeled, cubed daikon. Season liberally with salt and white pepper and simmer for about an hour, or 20 min in the pressure cooker.

    Optional: goji berries, cilantro garnish, thin sliced carrots

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