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Hummus, A Love Story: Recipe and Pictures

Hummus, A Love Story: Recipe and Pictures
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  • Post #31 - December 21st, 2007, 3:08 pm
    Post #31 - December 21st, 2007, 3:08 pm Post #31 - December 21st, 2007, 3:08 pm
    tyrus, thanks for the tips. I also found it a bit bland and just blah. I love roasted red peppers, so I thought adding them to hummus would make it even better. I will try adjusting the seasonings.

    Darren72, interesting about high proportions. I probably did 1:4 (peppers:chickpeas), so will try adding more peppers next time.
  • Post #32 - January 1st, 2008, 2:11 am
    Post #32 - January 1st, 2008, 2:11 am Post #32 - January 1st, 2008, 2:11 am
    As for store-bought hummus, I love Sabra brand - it's available at Costco and some Jewels. When I lived in Israel, this was my favorite brand to get (they make fresh batches daily at the grocery store deli counters with at least five different brands' proprietary recipes). While the local product is made in New York and not quite as great as the fresh stuff, it's pretty close. It's a much smoother hummus, not grainy at all - I talked with several restauranteurs there and in Dearborn and it seems the smooth texture is impossible to replicate without baking chickpeas for several hours to soften them prior to putting them in the food processor, so I just go for the Sabra instead. They have tons of varieties at Hungarian Kosher supermarket in Skokie, my favorite is the one with za'atar (a Middle-Eastern spice blend) or the hummus-tahini, which has a big dollop of tahini surrounded by hummus.

    Sorry to run on, but as you can tell from my handle I take my hummus seriously - thanks for the recipe Gary, I'll have to give your homemade version a try.
  • Post #33 - January 1st, 2008, 2:32 am
    Post #33 - January 1st, 2008, 2:32 am Post #33 - January 1st, 2008, 2:32 am
    I gotta agree, the Sabra hummus is probably my favorite store-bought hummus, and Costco's price is nearly competitive with making your own, if you consume a huge amount of the stuff.

    Ok, not really competitive, but very reasonable.
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #34 - January 1st, 2008, 11:41 am
    Post #34 - January 1st, 2008, 11:41 am Post #34 - January 1st, 2008, 11:41 am
    We used to buy the Costco stocked hummus quite regularly, but noticed in the past months/year that what originally was made with only olive oil and tahini now oftentimes contains mixes of either canola or soy (adulteration in my mind). The sabra brand also contains something non-desirable when I looked at the ingredient list (I can't recall now... definitely something not typically found in a "homemade" recipe).

    Anyways, I was always pleased in the past that the Costco stocked hummus only had around 5 "natural" ingredients - ie: chickpeas, tahini, olive oil, water, salt? It's disappointing that the manufacturer decided to use a cheaper substitute in canola & soy oils.

    As an aside, we recently tried a Trader Joe's branded hummus (and although I am far from a fan of Trader Joe's), we found the addition of pureed kalamata olives an interesting addition to the hummus - something I might try when making my own.
  • Post #35 - January 1st, 2008, 11:44 am
    Post #35 - January 1st, 2008, 11:44 am Post #35 - January 1st, 2008, 11:44 am
    Jay K wrote:We used to buy the Costco stocked hummus quite regularly, but noticed in the past months/year that what originally was made with only olive oil and tahini now oftentimes contains mixes of either canola or soy (adulteration in my mind). The sabra brand also contains something non-desirable when I looked at the ingredient list (I can't recall now... definitely something not typically found in a "homemade" recipe).


    Sabra's also contains soybean and/or canola oil. It was my favorite store-bought brand, but I've found it so much easier to keep the raw materials around than buying storebought. Homemade hummus is never more than 10 minutes away.

    Best,
    Michael
  • Post #36 - January 5th, 2008, 6:37 pm
    Post #36 - January 5th, 2008, 6:37 pm Post #36 - January 5th, 2008, 6:37 pm
    eatchicago wrote:I've found it so much easier to keep the raw materials around than buying storebought. Homemade hummus is never more than 10 minutes away.

    How do you make hummus in 10 minutes from raw chickpeas?
  • Post #37 - January 5th, 2008, 6:40 pm
    Post #37 - January 5th, 2008, 6:40 pm Post #37 - January 5th, 2008, 6:40 pm
    LAZ wrote:How do you make hummus in 10 minutes from raw chickpeas?

    LAZ,

    I believe you are being overly literal, using basic ingredients, such as a can of cooked chickpeas, hummus is easily made from scratch in under ten minutes.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Sauce on the side, always, implied, axiomatic..........never a doubt, BBQ sauce without.

    Low & Slow
  • Post #38 - January 5th, 2008, 6:57 pm
    Post #38 - January 5th, 2008, 6:57 pm Post #38 - January 5th, 2008, 6:57 pm
    G Wiv wrote:I believe you are being overly literal, using basic ingredients, such as a can of cooked chickpeas, hummus is easily made from scratch in under ten minutes.

    Ah. I thought maybe eatchicago had a trick I hadn't heard of.

    I do think of "raw materials" as, well, raw.

    And while I probably have less prejudice against convenience products than almost anyone here, I likely wouldn't describe a dish that started with canned goods as "from scratch," either. :wink:
  • Post #39 - January 5th, 2008, 7:07 pm
    Post #39 - January 5th, 2008, 7:07 pm Post #39 - January 5th, 2008, 7:07 pm
    LAZ wrote:And while I probably have less prejudice against convenience products than almost anyone here, I likely wouldn't describe a dish that started with canned goods as "from scratch," either. :wink:

    LAZ,

    In general I agree, I wouldn't describe a meal using Prime Rib in a Can from scratch, but might/would/have re hummus and canned chick peas.

    Canned chick peas for hummus, and beans for cold salads, are among the few convenience foods I regularly use.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Sauce on the side, always, implied, axiomatic..........never a doubt, BBQ sauce without.

    Low & Slow
  • Post #40 - January 5th, 2008, 7:33 pm
    Post #40 - January 5th, 2008, 7:33 pm Post #40 - January 5th, 2008, 7:33 pm
    G Wiv wrote:Canned chick peas for hummus, and beans for cold salads, are among the few convenience foods I regularly use.

    Gary, I would be thrilled to have you cook for me any time, starting from cans or not.

    I don't have anything against canned goods. In my kitchen right now are a variety of canned fruits, canned tomato products, canned fish, canned tahini, canned chilies in adobo sauce, canned stuffed grape leaves and probably other canned stuff. I have even been known to use canned potatoes.

    I wasn't impugning your cookery, just twitting you on word choice.
  • Post #41 - January 30th, 2008, 1:38 pm
    Post #41 - January 30th, 2008, 1:38 pm Post #41 - January 30th, 2008, 1:38 pm
    tyrus wrote:I've been making hummus for some time now and it really is pretty easy. I usually make a small serving (1 can of beans, 1/2 lemon, 1 Tbsp Tahini, 1 clover garlic, olive oil / water) in my $20 small food processor, for the larger quantity, I use the larger food processor. I've also heard of using a blender or even a potato masher. Anyway, in mine, it's basically - chick peas, garlic, tahini, olive oil, and lemon, plus salt and pepper. That's it. When it's fresh, it's better than any store bought item. Also, when you use pitas to make your "chips," it's much better than any store bought as well. I do the same as the poster, pita bread, cut into wedges, brushed with olive oil. I then salt with coarse sea salt.

    I've found a few things really make a difference. Although I use canned chick peas, I don't retain the liquid. I rinse the chick peas really well. I feel this prevents a "muddy" flavor or consistency. If I need additional liquid, it's just clean water to the desired consistency. Also, to prevent strong doses of garlic, I mince, then paste my garlic with salt, before adding to the processor. Lastly, use a high quality olive oil, since this is not cooked.

    The simple hummus recipe is a nice base to start experimenting. I've gone spicy, adding cayenne and chilies to the mix and I've also added some roast red pepper for that flavor as well. I've also experimented with different bean and enjoy great northern beans without the tahini for more of an american flavor. Good luck.


    HI,

    I made your hummos the other night, though I could not find my unopened container of tahini. Recalling a friend from Israel who prefer's mayonnaise, I substituted it for the tahini. It came out very nice, light and refreshing with nobody noticing my substitution.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #42 - January 30th, 2008, 1:41 pm
    Post #42 - January 30th, 2008, 1:41 pm Post #42 - January 30th, 2008, 1:41 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:I made your hummos the other night, though I could not find my unopened container of tahini. Recalling a friend from Israel who prefer's mayonnaise, I substituted it for the tahini. It came out very nice, light and refreshing with nobody noticing my substitution.


    Interesting substitution. I have never heard of that, nor would I have thought of it.

    I've substituted a little bit of peanut butter for tahini in the past with good results.

    Best,
    Michael
  • Post #43 - January 30th, 2008, 3:00 pm
    Post #43 - January 30th, 2008, 3:00 pm Post #43 - January 30th, 2008, 3:00 pm
    Michael,

    I had given a passing thought to peanut butter, though it is somewhat of an assertive flavor. Whereas the mayonnaise is less assertive largely going unnoticed, though present to help emulsify.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #44 - January 30th, 2008, 9:37 pm
    Post #44 - January 30th, 2008, 9:37 pm Post #44 - January 30th, 2008, 9:37 pm
    tyrus wrote:I've been making hummus for some time now and it really is pretty easy. I usually make a small serving (1 can of beans, 1/2 lemon, 1 Tbsp Tahini, 1 clover garlic, olive oil / water) in my $20 small food processor, for the larger quantity, I use the larger food processor. I've also heard of using a blender or even a potato masher. Anyway, in mine, it's basically - chick peas, garlic, tahini, olive oil, and lemon, plus salt and pepper. That's it. When it's fresh, it's better than any store bought item. Also, when you use pitas to make your "chips," it's much better than any store bought as well. I do the same as the poster, pita bread, cut into wedges, brushed with olive oil. I then salt with coarse sea salt.

    I've found a few things really make a difference. Although I use canned chick peas, I don't retain the liquid. I rinse the chick peas really well. I feel this prevents a "muddy" flavor or consistency. If I need additional liquid, it's just clean water to the desired consistency. Also, to prevent strong doses of garlic, I mince, then paste my garlic with salt, before adding to the processor. Lastly, use a high quality olive oil, since this is not cooked.

    The simple hummus recipe is a nice base to start experimenting. I've gone spicy, adding cayenne and chilies to the mix and I've also added some roast red pepper for that flavor as well. I've also experimented with different bean and enjoy great northern beans without the tahini for more of an american flavor. Good luck.



    I find the ice cube idea interesting - will have to try that next time.


    What works for me - canned chick peas - but i always peel the skins off before i use them. it really gets rid of that muddy flavor & almost makes the hummus slightly "fluffy" if you leave the cuisinart on for an extra minute. Also am huge on using the liquid from the can - never water. I feel it's the skins that add the muddy flavor, not the juice.
  • Post #45 - July 23rd, 2009, 6:53 am
    Post #45 - July 23rd, 2009, 6:53 am Post #45 - July 23rd, 2009, 6:53 am
    LTH,

    Been on a hummus kick lately, healthy, tasty, served with a abundance of fresh cut crunchy veg, pita, olives and the occasional hard boiled egg. Yep, hard boiled egg and hummus with a drizzle of good olive oil to bring it all together.

    Fueling my hummus binge, along with a desire to eat healthier, is my new found love for Sanabel Bakery. Still warm from the oven pita, including flat Lebanese style, spinach and cheese pies and lahmajun (Middle Eastern pizza) with cheese, za'atar or half/half. I'm also enamored with Sanabel's dairy and dry goods. A small, actually very small, selection to be sure, but impeccably fresh as turnover is high. For example, I've been buying Ziyad tahini for years and the sesame paste typically separated into a dry on the bottom mass of sesame paste topped by an inch or two of sesame oil, difficult to recombine to say the least. Sanabel's tahini requires but a couple of shakes of the bottle to perfectly combine.

    I've also been digging Labne, thick spreadable yogurt, with za'atar for veg dip, mixed with honey or as Mr. Baconfest himself, Seth Zurer suggested, with apricot jam which makes for a delicious light dessert or sweet tangy snack.

    Business, as it should be with a shop of this quality, must be good as Sanabel is moving the retail operation half a block to the south and keeping the present location as bakery only, though the move is a few months away.

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    Sanabel Bakery
    4253 North Kedzie
    Chicago 60618
    773-539-5409
    Sauce on the side, always, implied, axiomatic..........never a doubt, BBQ sauce without.

    Low & Slow
  • Post #46 - July 23rd, 2009, 9:09 am
    Post #46 - July 23rd, 2009, 9:09 am Post #46 - July 23rd, 2009, 9:09 am
    Inspired by GWiv's love of hummus, I made a batch yesterday. I enjoyed it with some fresh pita, but then inspired by god knows what, used it as a condiment on a grilled Vienna hot dog. Although I'm a hard core Chicago dog fan, the hummus dog was really good and something I'll make again often. Try it, you'll like it.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #47 - July 23rd, 2009, 9:46 am
    Post #47 - July 23rd, 2009, 9:46 am Post #47 - July 23rd, 2009, 9:46 am
    stevez wrote:but then inspired by god knows what, used it as a condiment on a grilled Vienna hot dog.

    You crazy!
    Sauce on the side, always, implied, axiomatic..........never a doubt, BBQ sauce without.

    Low & Slow
  • Post #48 - July 23rd, 2009, 9:58 am
    Post #48 - July 23rd, 2009, 9:58 am Post #48 - July 23rd, 2009, 9:58 am
    We sampled some hot giardiniera hummus at Whole Foods a while back & were intrigued, so my wife whipped up a batch my just dumping some hot giardiniera (half a jar, with almost all of the oil drained off, went into a 2-can batch) into the bowl when the hummus was almost done, then hitting it with the stick blender until the spicy veg bits were chopped up a bit.

    I do believe hot giardiniera is my new favorite hummus flavor.
  • Post #49 - July 23rd, 2009, 2:49 pm
    Post #49 - July 23rd, 2009, 2:49 pm Post #49 - July 23rd, 2009, 2:49 pm
    I am a hummus addict, and as such, I make it on a very regular basis. My recipe is also pretty basic - I usually use 1/2 chick peas 1/2 white beans (drained and rinsed), tahini, lemon juice, garlic, olive oil and salt. I find that the addition of white beans gives it a nice texture.

    Giardinera hummus is, by far, one of the most delicious flavors of hummus that I have encountered. Pure genius! I'll also make roasted red pepper hummus and sun dried tomato hummus from time to time, just by adding the jarred roasted red peppers and sun dried tomatoes. You can do the same with kalamata olives, chives, roasted cumin, etc.
  • Post #50 - July 23rd, 2009, 5:13 pm
    Post #50 - July 23rd, 2009, 5:13 pm Post #50 - July 23rd, 2009, 5:13 pm
    For a smokier flavor, add some pimenton (smoked paprika). It compliments the flavor of the roasted red pepper and adds some kick.
  • Post #51 - July 23rd, 2009, 8:10 pm
    Post #51 - July 23rd, 2009, 8:10 pm Post #51 - July 23rd, 2009, 8:10 pm
    stevez wrote: but then inspired by god knows what, used it as a condiment on a grilled Vienna hot dog. Although I'm a hard core Chicago dog fan, the hummus dog was really good and something I'll make again often. Try it, you'll like it.


    You've reminded me of the excellent tuna sandwiches I had in the Middle East, I had no idea of the great combo potential. The hummus and tuna make a sort of tuna salad (sort of fitting in with the upthread comment about mayo working in hummus) stuffed in some pita with veggies. I'll have to revisit this, and give your dog idea a try too...
  • Post #52 - July 23rd, 2009, 8:20 pm
    Post #52 - July 23rd, 2009, 8:20 pm Post #52 - July 23rd, 2009, 8:20 pm
    Hi,

    There is a sports bar in Highwood that serves hummos covered with a Greek Village type salad minus the feta. Cucumbers, tomatoes and onions in a vinaigrette dressing. It is an appetizer served with pita, I can easily call it lunch.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #53 - July 25th, 2009, 11:07 am
    Post #53 - July 25th, 2009, 11:07 am Post #53 - July 25th, 2009, 11:07 am
    I think I need to post this to the You Know You Are an LTHer When... thread....

    I just stopped reading, got up, and made a salad (beets tomato cucumber, chickpeas, oranges onion, etc)
    Leek

    SAVING ONE DOG may not change the world,
    but it CHANGES THE WORLD for that one dog.
    American Brittany Rescue always needs foster homes. Please think about helping that one dog. http://www.americanbrittanyrescue.org
  • Post #54 - July 25th, 2009, 12:27 pm
    Post #54 - July 25th, 2009, 12:27 pm Post #54 - July 25th, 2009, 12:27 pm
    stevez wrote:Although I'm a hard core Chicago dog fan, the hummus dog was really good and something I'll make again often. Try it, you'll like it.

    Monkey Read, Monkey Do!

    Image
    Image

    Damn good combo, though now that I think of it beans and franks are one of the classic flavor combinations.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Sauce on the side, always, implied, axiomatic..........never a doubt, BBQ sauce without.

    Low & Slow
  • Post #55 - July 25th, 2009, 4:03 pm
    Post #55 - July 25th, 2009, 4:03 pm Post #55 - July 25th, 2009, 4:03 pm
    I made raw zucchin "hummus" today and really is good. So if your looking for something different to do with a lot of zucchini this is it.

    Peel and coursely chop 3 zucchini put in processor, add garlic, paprika, salt, tahini, cumin, cayenne and puree while adding olive oil. The original recipe calls for soaked sesame seeds or sunflower seeds which I didn't add, it might be thicker if they are added.

    Paulette
  • Post #56 - July 26th, 2009, 7:20 am
    Post #56 - July 26th, 2009, 7:20 am Post #56 - July 26th, 2009, 7:20 am
    Can you freeze leftover tahini??
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #57 - July 26th, 2009, 12:36 pm
    Post #57 - July 26th, 2009, 12:36 pm Post #57 - July 26th, 2009, 12:36 pm
    Tahini keeps for months in the refrigerator. The only spoilage relates to the sesame oil, which is much more stable than olive oil, going rancid.
  • Post #58 - July 27th, 2009, 7:42 pm
    Post #58 - July 27th, 2009, 7:42 pm Post #58 - July 27th, 2009, 7:42 pm
    Khaopaat wrote:We sampled some hot giardiniera hummus at Whole Foods a while back & were intrigued, so my wife whipped up a batch my just dumping some hot giardiniera (half a jar, with almost all of the oil drained off, went into a 2-can batch) into the bowl when the hummus was almost done, then hitting it with the stick blender until the spicy veg bits were chopped up a bit.

    I do believe hot giardiniera is my new favorite hummus flavor.


    Brilliant!! Not only good by itself but the perfect hummus to use for the aforementioned hummus hot dog, too. I can't wait to try this.
    Objects in mirror appear to be losing.
  • Post #59 - July 29th, 2009, 3:42 pm
    Post #59 - July 29th, 2009, 3:42 pm Post #59 - July 29th, 2009, 3:42 pm
    RE: upthread discussion about creamy hummus like Sabra, a few months back (probably almost a year now) Cook's Illustrated tackled this issue - how to make homemade hummus that wasn't grainy but rather was creamy and smooth. If I remember correctly, and since it's not in front of me to check, the recipe had compared making hummus to making a vinaigrette in that the goal was to create an emulsion between the lemon/bean liquid and the oil/tahini. Thus, it instructed you to process the chickpeas, garlic, lemon juice, salt, and some of the bean liquid first till as smooth as possible. Then you mix the olive oil with the tahini separately and drizzle it into the food processor while its running so that it makes an emulsion, allowing the hummus to be creamier etc.

    On a side note, it also had a recipe for red pepper-chipotle hummus that was sweet 'n spicy. Yum.

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