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Interesting obituaries

Interesting obituaries
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  • Post #301 - July 27th, 2017, 8:09 am
    Post #301 - July 27th, 2017, 8:09 am Post #301 - July 27th, 2017, 8:09 am
    Bo Pilgrim, Founder of Pilgrim’s Pride Poultry Products, Dies at 89

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/24/busi ... tcore-ipad
    "Sandwiches are wonderful. You don't need a spoon or a plate!"
    Paul Lynde
  • Post #302 - August 2nd, 2017, 11:27 pm
    Post #302 - August 2nd, 2017, 11:27 pm Post #302 - August 2nd, 2017, 11:27 pm
    Imagine having rejected The Diary of Anne Frank! (To be clear, it was not this lady.) What would our historical record have been like.

    Judith Jones, Editor of Literature and Culinary Delight, Dies at 93

    https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/08/02/u ... -dead.html
  • Post #303 - August 3rd, 2017, 6:45 pm
    Post #303 - August 3rd, 2017, 6:45 pm Post #303 - August 3rd, 2017, 6:45 pm
    excelsior wrote:Imagine having rejected The Diary of Anne Frank! (To be clear, it was not this lady.) What would our historical record have been like.

    Judith Jones, Editor of Literature and Culinary Delight, Dies at 93

    https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/08/02/u ... -dead.html

    Thanks for posting this.
    "I would gladly pay you Tuesday for a hamburger today."
  • Post #304 - August 4th, 2017, 1:08 pm
    Post #304 - August 4th, 2017, 1:08 pm Post #304 - August 4th, 2017, 1:08 pm
    A follow-up article on Judith Jones, obituary above.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/02/dini ... ditor.html
  • Post #305 - August 9th, 2017, 8:26 pm
    Post #305 - August 9th, 2017, 8:26 pm Post #305 - August 9th, 2017, 8:26 pm
    Christian Millau, a founder of the influential Gault-Millau restaurant guide, which led the way in making nouvelle cuisine a global force in the early 1970s, died on Saturday at his home in Paris. He was 88.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/08/worl ... -ipad&_r=0
    "Sandwiches are wonderful. You don't need a spoon or a plate!"
    Paul Lynde
  • Post #306 - August 10th, 2017, 1:09 pm
    Post #306 - August 10th, 2017, 1:09 pm Post #306 - August 10th, 2017, 1:09 pm
    Chicago restaurateur (Heaven on Seven) George Bannos
    http://www.wlsam.com/2017/08/09/chicago ... nnos-dies/

    Robert Feder also mentioned their regular feature from a few years ago, Chewing the Fat with The Bannos Brothers, on WGN Radio, which you can find a few streams of if you Google.
  • Post #307 - August 24th, 2017, 12:16 pm
    Post #307 - August 24th, 2017, 12:16 pm Post #307 - August 24th, 2017, 12:16 pm
    Leland ‘Sugar’ Cain, top railroad chef in glory era, dead at 92

    ...
    “There was a lot of racism,” said Mr. Cain’s friend Ralph Justen, former executive director of the National Railroad Museum in Green Bay, Wisconsin.

    The many African-American men who worked in train kitchens often weren’t visible to passengers, but Mr. Cain and others contributed to the railroads’ success, said Edward Burkhardt, a former boss.

    “One of the ways they competed with each other was their dining cars,” said Burkhardt, a former C&NW vice president who’s now chief executive officer of Rail World, a transportation consulting firm. “He was a great chef but also Mr. Personality.”
    ...
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #308 - September 12th, 2017, 1:28 pm
    Post #308 - September 12th, 2017, 1:28 pm Post #308 - September 12th, 2017, 1:28 pm
    Constantine 'Gus' Alpogianis, ran Palace Grill and Kappy's, dies at 85

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-c ... story.html
    "Sandwiches are wonderful. You don't need a spoon or a plate!"
    Paul Lynde
  • Post #309 - October 5th, 2017, 9:41 am
    Post #309 - October 5th, 2017, 9:41 am Post #309 - October 5th, 2017, 9:41 am
    Northwest culinary evangelist Jon Rowley dies at 74
    Jon Rowley was the very first member of Culinary Historians of Chicago. Apparently, Bruce Kraig had talked about this for a while. Jon handed him $25, announced he was his first member and please set a meeting.

    It was on my bucket list to join him for his annual Walrus and Carpenter picnic at low tide.

    "O Oysters come and walk with us, a pleasant walk, a pleasant talk, upon the briny beach..."

    Hosted by Taylor Shellfish Farms as a benefit for the Puget Sound Restoration Fund, the Walrus & Carpenter picnics provide the ultimate oyster-eating experience. "We are pleased and honored to join with Taylor Shellfish for these night-time excursions. Eating oysters right off the beach is the ultimate reminder that we are fed by these waters and forever bound to keep them clean," says Betsy Peabody, Executive Director of the Restoration Fund.

    Lewis Carroll's "The Walrus and The Carpenter," a whimsical tale about how the Walrus and the Carpenter lure the oysters for "a pleasant walk, a pleasant talk, upon the briny beach" and then proceed to eat every one, provided the inspiration for these picnics, says organizer, Jon Rowley.

    Walrus and Carpenters depart on the Oyster Bus for the 1 1/2 hour ride to Totten Inlet at 6:30 pm from Taylor's Queen Anne Oyster Bar at 124 Republican Street returning around midnight. To instill a sense of adventure, the Oyster Bus ventures forth regardless of weather. Walruses and Carpenters are therefore advised to dress for the weather to stay warm and dry.

    The nighttime, low tide “picnic” takes place by lantern and moonlight on Taylor’s Totten Inlet oyster bed in the middle of winter when oysters—Olympia, Shigoku, Pacific and Totten Inlet Virginica—are at their peak. An icy gust of wind off the bay can invigorate the experience. Plump, sweet, perky oysters just rousted from their beds, opened on the spot, with cold, crisp “oyster wines” served in Reidel stemware make for just the right mix of magic and madness.


    From a profile some years ago:
    ...
    ASK ANYONE IN Seattle about Rowley, and the first thing they mention is Copper River salmon. Rowley had met some fishermen from Alaska’s Copper River at Fish Expo in 1982. They had small boats and no refrigeration. They would fish for two or three days, then offload to tenders that took the salmon to coastal canneries where the fish were put on conveyors. Rowley, who considers Copper River king the best salmon in the world, thought this tantamount to criminal activity.

    The fishermen complained about poor prices but had no idea how to improve their situation. Rowley realized that if he could persuade them to handle the fish properly on the boat — to bleed, clean and ice the fish in its pristine state — these fishermen might have a brilliant future.

    In October over dinner at McCormick’s Fish House they had said, “We can’t do it.” By the following March, they called back: “We think we’d like to give it a try.”

    Rowley had them load 300 pounds of Copper River king on Alaska Airlines with the first spring run of the 1983 season. He met the fish in Seattle and took them around to his restaurants.

    “It was pretty clear to everybody that something was going on,” he recalls. Wayne Ludvigsen, then chef at Ray’s Boathouse, took his hand and rubbed it on the first Copper River king he had ever seen. His fingers came away covered with red oil.

    The customers went crazy.
    ...
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #310 - October 9th, 2017, 7:04 pm
    Post #310 - October 9th, 2017, 7:04 pm Post #310 - October 9th, 2017, 7:04 pm
    John Andrews, ran family caramel apple company in Chicago, dies at 92

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/obit ... story.html
    "Sandwiches are wonderful. You don't need a spoon or a plate!"
    Paul Lynde
  • Post #311 - October 13th, 2017, 6:54 am
    Post #311 - October 13th, 2017, 6:54 am Post #311 - October 13th, 2017, 6:54 am
    Jeanne Marie Uzdawinis, co-founder of one of Lincoln Square’s most enduring eateries, died Sunday of ovarian cancer. She was 63.

    Her Cafe Selmarie restaurant, at 4729 N. Lincoln, started in 1983 as a storefront with a pastry case filled with tortes, cheesecakes, eclairs and good coffee.


    https://chicago.suntimes.com/news/jeann ... -selmarie/
  • Post #312 - November 8th, 2017, 11:55 am
    Post #312 - November 8th, 2017, 11:55 am Post #312 - November 8th, 2017, 11:55 am
    A big loss for Willamette Valley pinot noir fans. Patty Green was found in her cabin retreat at the too young age of 62. I have been a fan of her wines since the 2001 vintage and still terribly miss their Four Winds vineyard release since they lost access to those grapes a few years ago.

    With great sadness, we would like to inform you that Patricia Green has passed away unexpectedly at the age of 62. She was at her home in Roseburg, Oregon when she was found. There is no way to convey this message without the heartache and loss that we feel here at the winery.

    Note from Jim Anderson (Owner-Winemaker):

    I had the special privilege of having known, worked and partnered with Patty for over 20 years. I met Patty in 1995 and over the course of the preceding 22+ years we went from strangers working together to co-conspirators in making something out of a new Oregon winery to partners in a vineyard and winery venture that surpasses anything we ever expected to do. We had ups and downs like anybody does in any sort of relationship but we used to joke that other than the weird people whose marriages somehow survived owning a winery together that we were the longest standing winemaking duo in Oregon. There's something to both the factual information about that and the joking sentiment behind it that contribute to the special nature of our relationship.

    Patty was a mighty force and an old soul crammed into a small little body. She had done so many interesting and crazy things in her life way before she started making wine that it was hilarious how far down the list the life of a winemaker was in her amazing life. Her approach to winemaking was pure. She had no motivations to be famous or acknowledged or even particularly that well paid. She had a belief in what parts of the earth could bear and what she could do to guide that fruit along a path of turning from one pristine to state to another. Because of her desire to be extremely low-profile and the nature of the winery itself she likely did not get the accolades for her work in the Oregon wine business. Nonetheless I know that the loss I feel will also be a loss to the more delicate soul of all the things that make winemaking and vineyard tending special in Oregon.

    Obviously at this time we are simply attempting to inform people and figure out how we will all go about grieving. There is still very little information available, even to us, and we appreciate that for the time being folks allow us to attempt to figure out where things stand and what will be done to ensure that everyone can have an opportunity, if they wish, to share in saying goodbye and celebrating the life of a unique, special and wonderful individual.

    We understand and appreciate that people may want to reach out. Memorial services details are in progress.

    Patricia Green Cellars Team
  • Post #313 - November 8th, 2017, 1:45 pm
    Post #313 - November 8th, 2017, 1:45 pm Post #313 - November 8th, 2017, 1:45 pm
    Al Ehrhardt wrote:A big loss for Willamette Valley pinot noir fans. Patty Green was found in her cabin retreat at the too young age of 62. I have been a fan of her wines since the 2001 vintage and still terribly miss their Four Winds vineyard release since they lost access to those grapes a few years ago.

    One of the highlights of a birthday trip to the Willamette Valley a couple of years ago was a visit to the Patricia Green winery. We didn't meet Patty, but we had a great experience and my friends are still members of the wine club.
    -Mary

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