LTH Home

You eat WHAT for breakfast?

You eat WHAT for breakfast?
  • Forum HomePost Reply BackTop
    Page 2 of 5
  • Post #31 - January 26th, 2005, 8:12 pm
    Post #31 - January 26th, 2005, 8:12 pm Post #31 - January 26th, 2005, 8:12 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:Hi,

    I don't like the hashbrown. I will offer them to someone or throw it away if I somehow ended up with one.


    I can't stand their hash browns, Dave on the other hand usually downs 2 of them every Saturday morning. I think the grease helps his hungover head... =)
  • Post #32 - February 12th, 2005, 9:09 am
    Post #32 - February 12th, 2005, 9:09 am Post #32 - February 12th, 2005, 9:09 am
    LTH,

    Meant to post this a couple of days ago, cold skate sandwich on white bread with mayo and sliced red onion. I normally use Hellman's, but was out so I broke out the jar of Duke's Cathy2 had given me. Made for a nice change of pace, both breakfast and mayo wise.

    Here's a pic of skate the previous evening, no breakfast sandwich pic. Spinach is fresh from Marketplace on Oakton, sauteed with a little garlic, and rice is straight from a box Near East. Yea, yea, I know, box rice, what can I say, sometimes Near East rice pilaf just hits the spot. :)

    Image

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Sauce on the side, always, implied, axiomatic..........never a doubt, BBQ sauce without.

    Low & Slow
  • Post #33 - February 12th, 2005, 10:57 am
    Post #33 - February 12th, 2005, 10:57 am Post #33 - February 12th, 2005, 10:57 am
    G Wiv wrote:LTH,

    Meant to post this a couple of days ago, cold skate sandwich on white bread with mayo and sliced red onion. I normally use Hellman's, but was out so I broke out the jar of Duke's Cathy2 had given me. Made for a nice change of pace, both breakfast and mayo wise.

    Here's a pic of skate the previous evening, no breakfast sandwich pic. Spinach is fresh from Marketplace on Oakton, sauteed with a little garlic, and rice is straight from a box Near East. Yea, yea, I know, box rice, what can I say, sometimes Near East rice pilaf just hits the spot. :)

    Image

    Enjoy,
    Gary


    I'm with you on Near East pilaf mixes--love 'em. But cold skate w/mayo, that may be the one disgusting breakfast in this whole thread :wink:
  • Post #34 - February 12th, 2005, 7:48 pm
    Post #34 - February 12th, 2005, 7:48 pm Post #34 - February 12th, 2005, 7:48 pm
    As a college student, I used to work the graveyard shift in downtown Boston. When I could afford it, the best breakfast in the world was a lobster roll sandwich from a little diner around the corner after work at 7AM. The regulars eating the standard American breakfast would give me grief for eating lobsta for breakfast.

    I used to believe that, if it was good for dinner, it was good and sometimes even better for breakfast, but my aging digestive system increasingly tends to differ. :(

    Bill/SFNM
  • Post #35 - February 12th, 2005, 8:34 pm
    Post #35 - February 12th, 2005, 8:34 pm Post #35 - February 12th, 2005, 8:34 pm
    Hi,

    In my other life, I often would eat blinchiki's for breakfast. These are crepes filled with cooked ground meat with long-cooked onions, cooked separately and reintroduced after the meat is cooked, seasoned simply with salt and pepper to taste:

    Photo courtesy of Erik M.
    Image

    Blinchikis are very portable food like our sandwiches. I have seen Russians eating them on picnics as well as trains. Of course, they are never better when eaten fresh from the pan with some sour cream.
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #36 - February 13th, 2005, 3:01 pm
    Post #36 - February 13th, 2005, 3:01 pm Post #36 - February 13th, 2005, 3:01 pm
    I too suffer from in-laws that set the table for you with 3-4 types of cereal, a piece of fruit (grapefruit or underripe melon), some overly sweetened berries. I have to hide in my bedroom reading for an hour or two before emerging to face that.

    They now live (happily at breakfast time, other times I'd be glad to have them nearer:-) 1000 miles away. When they used to maintain a summer cottage in so. Wisconsin, with plenty of access to good home-grown tomatoes, I would occasionally bypass the breakfast spread for my preferred summer breakfast over all others (except perhaps for cold leftover Chinese/Thai, but that can always be saved for lunch). My preferred summer breakfast comes to me from my grandmother and mother, and is a good quality bread, toasted, buttered while hot, and with sliced tomato, salt, and pepper. Pure Midwestern heaven. I occasionally now substitute good olive oil for the butter, and may even rub the bread with garlic.

    My mother-in-law, who oddly enough loves tomatoes, once saw me eat a whole (not huge, but not tiny) fresh tomato on two slices of toast, and seemed incredulous. I think this is a nice and decently healthy breakfast.

    I also like smoked fish of any sort for breakfast. My mother and I used to sometimes have a bowl of fresh tomato, cut in large chunks, with a good cottage or ricotta cheese, salt, and lots of pepper, with a side of a blind robbin. Others in the family objected, solely on the basis of the blind robbin.
  • Post #37 - February 13th, 2005, 3:12 pm
    Post #37 - February 13th, 2005, 3:12 pm Post #37 - February 13th, 2005, 3:12 pm
    annieb wrote:I also like smoked fish of any sort for breakfast. My mother and I used to sometimes have a bowl of fresh tomato, cut in large chunks, with a good cottage or ricotta cheese, salt, and lots of pepper, with a side of a blind robbin. Others in the family objected, solely on the basis of the blind robbin.


    Blind robin is a name brand, right, or does it refer to a type of smoked fish (indigenous to Wisconsin bars)?

    Hammond
    “We all have to stand before the kitchen gods.” Chef Jacob Sahaya Kumar Aruni
  • Post #38 - February 13th, 2005, 3:21 pm
    Post #38 - February 13th, 2005, 3:21 pm Post #38 - February 13th, 2005, 3:21 pm
    David Hammond wrote:
    annieb wrote:I also like smoked fish of any sort for breakfast. My mother and I used to sometimes have a bowl of fresh tomato, cut in large chunks, with a good cottage or ricotta cheese, salt, and lots of pepper, with a side of a blind robbin. Others in the family objected, solely on the basis of the blind robbin.


    Blind robin is a name brand, right, or does it refer to a type of smoked fish (indigenous to Wisconsin bars)?

    Hammond


    There's this thread for more blind robin stuf:

    http://www.lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.php?t=2407
  • Post #39 - February 13th, 2005, 3:28 pm
    Post #39 - February 13th, 2005, 3:28 pm Post #39 - February 13th, 2005, 3:28 pm
    Vital Information wrote:
    David Hammond wrote:
    annieb wrote:I also like smoked fish of any sort for breakfast. My mother and I used to sometimes have a bowl of fresh tomato, cut in large chunks, with a good cottage or ricotta cheese, salt, and lots of pepper, with a side of a blind robbin. Others in the family objected, solely on the basis of the blind robbin.


    Blind robin is a name brand, right, or does it refer to a type of smoked fish (indigenous to Wisconsin bars)?

    Hammond


    There's this thread for more blind robin stuf:

    http://www.lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.php?t=2407


    VI,

    It seems like blind robins are both a generic name for a certain kind of smoked fish (as offered at Supreme, for instance), but it also seems to be a brand name (http://www.theblindrobins.com/WhatBlindRobin.htm).

    Hammond
    “We all have to stand before the kitchen gods.” Chef Jacob Sahaya Kumar Aruni
  • Post #40 - February 14th, 2005, 1:07 am
    Post #40 - February 14th, 2005, 1:07 am Post #40 - February 14th, 2005, 1:07 am
    I am not sure what the fish is that gets made into blind robbins is, herring is a good guess, it's that size. They are filets, VERY heavily salted and VERY dry.

    They are a Michigan thing, at least in my experience. You can find them in unfancy supermarkets there. Kind of like ring bologna is a Michigan thing. For our fifth anniversary, as Himself and I were wending our way up the peninsula and thought we should stop and pick up some basics so we would have the makings for breakfast, I said: I'll bet they have jars of pickled bologna. Himself was skeptical (having some Quaker background), but lo and behold, when we walked in, we were greeted with a giant pyramid of one-gallon jars of pickled ring bologna.

    Personally, I prefer my ring bologna not pickled, so I can season it myself:-)
  • Post #41 - March 11th, 2006, 10:16 am
    Post #41 - March 11th, 2006, 10:16 am Post #41 - March 11th, 2006, 10:16 am
    éna almiró ellinikó próyevma

    Image

    - whole wheat bread, toasted (Masi's Italian Superior Bakery)
    - imported Greek feta
    - seedless cucumber
    - white onion
    - flat leaf parsley
    - sea salt
    - freshly ground black pepper
    - extra virgin olive oil from Crete

    yiá sas,
    Antonius
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #42 - March 11th, 2006, 10:56 pm
    Post #42 - March 11th, 2006, 10:56 pm Post #42 - March 11th, 2006, 10:56 pm
    Yum. Antonius, your picture reminds me of the kibbutz salad I used to have when I lived in Israel. Every morning, I would grab some vegetables off of the buffet table, usually cucumber, tomatoes, onions, olives from the kibbutz's olive factory(a really horrible place to work) and mix it up with some spices and oil. I would add some white cheese and some bread with jam and butter. We never had lettuce for some reason. I would occasionally throw in a hard boiled egg or a fried egg. That was also dinner (minus the fried eggs), with the addition of any leftovers from lunch. I still love a chopped salad for breakfast.
    " There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life."
    - Frank Zappa
  • Post #43 - March 11th, 2006, 11:31 pm
    Post #43 - March 11th, 2006, 11:31 pm Post #43 - March 11th, 2006, 11:31 pm
    My breakfasts run pretty boring, especially compared to Thing1, my #1 son. While I'll enjoy the occasional cold leftover: pizza and spaghetti in particular, any leftovers are fair game for him: Fried calamari, thai curry, quesadillas, cold porkchops... and if none of that is available, there's always ramen.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #44 - March 12th, 2006, 2:33 pm
    Post #44 - March 12th, 2006, 2:33 pm Post #44 - March 12th, 2006, 2:33 pm
    sdritz wrote:Yum. Antonius, your picture reminds me of the kibbutz salad I used to have when I lived in Israel. Every morning, I would grab some vegetables off of the buffet table, usually cucumber, tomatoes, onions, olives from the kibbutz's olive factory(a really horrible place to work) and mix it up with some spices and oil. I would add some white cheese and some bread with jam and butter. We never had lettuce for some reason. I would occasionally throw in a hard boiled egg or a fried egg. That was also dinner (minus the fried eggs), with the addition of any leftovers from lunch. I still love a chopped salad for breakfast.


    S.,

    What's the white cheese you refer to above? Is it something feta-like or is it more of the 'fresh cheese' variety, like the Arab fresh cheeses available in the Arab markets around town?

    Also, just curious, what was so awful about the olive factory? I take it the operation involved curing table olives rather than oil-making, no?

    A
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #45 - March 12th, 2006, 9:42 pm
    Post #45 - March 12th, 2006, 9:42 pm Post #45 - March 12th, 2006, 9:42 pm
    Breakfast w/ the in-laws:

    Going Clockwise
    Image
    Aji - Umeboshi - Canned Tuna on Salad - Spinach - Nimono - Shirataki - Tamago

    Image
    Porridge w/ Seasoned Nori Paste

    Image
    White Asparagus - Salad - Miso Soup - Rice - Dried Fish w/ Walnuts - Fishcake - Pickles - Grilled Salmon

    Image
    Chicken Salad - Grilled Shrimp - Stewed Black Cod - Matsutake Mushroom Gohan

    Image
    Rice - Fried Rice - Grilled Saba - Kabocha

    Image
    Red Bean & Chestnut Rice - Kabocha - Gomae Spinach - Fishcake & Greens - Pickles - Salad - Chive Mushroom Soup

    Typical Japanese breakfast is soup, grilled fish and rice; The above includes variations on the theme (yes, they were all breakfast meals). The first pictured is actually from a hot springs inn that we stayed in overnight - the rest were all from home. The porridge at the hot springs breakfast was THE best thing; I must have eaten three bowls of the stuff w/ the seasoned nori paste on top.

    These days breakfast is a diet soda and PBJ. :(
    Last edited by Jay K on November 25th, 2008, 12:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #46 - March 13th, 2006, 10:36 am
    Post #46 - March 13th, 2006, 10:36 am Post #46 - March 13th, 2006, 10:36 am
    Jay K,

    Wow. Those are some serious breakfasts... and some very beautiful photos. Thanks much for posting them.

    What are the flavours of the porridge and nori paste like? It looks great but I know nothing about either of the elements of that dish...

    TIA
    Antonius
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #47 - March 13th, 2006, 10:27 pm
    Post #47 - March 13th, 2006, 10:27 pm Post #47 - March 13th, 2006, 10:27 pm
    Erik M - my goodness....that is a picture of my ideal breakfast, lunch and dinner. I should be lucky not to live so close to Tank.... I would be there for every waking meal. lol
  • Post #48 - March 13th, 2006, 11:31 pm
    Post #48 - March 13th, 2006, 11:31 pm Post #48 - March 13th, 2006, 11:31 pm
    Jay K wrote:Breakfast w/ the in-laws:(

    Jay K,

    Beautiful breakfast, quite mouth-watering!

    Far as Erik M's breakfast, for those interested it's # 108 on Tank's menu. It looked so damn good I looked it up. :)

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Sauce on the side, always, implied, axiomatic..........never a doubt, BBQ sauce without.

    Low & Slow
  • Post #49 - March 14th, 2006, 12:37 am
    Post #49 - March 14th, 2006, 12:37 am Post #49 - March 14th, 2006, 12:37 am
    foodie1 wrote:Erik M - my goodness....that is a picture of my ideal breakfast, lunch and dinner. I should be lucky not to live so close to Tank.... I would be there for every waking meal. lol


    G Wiv wrote:Far as Erik M's breakfast, for those interested it's # 108 on Tank's menu.


    I currently average two meals a week at Tank and the vast majority of my visits are during the breakfast/lunch hour.

    #108 remains a breakfast favourite, but these days I more frequently order bánh mì cà ri gà, or "bread with curried chicken."*

    If you ever try it, I would encourage you to ask that the dish be made "spicy hot."

    The stuff is killer.

    E.M.

    * The curry iteself is made with bone-in pieces of chicken, chunks of soft taro, curry leaves, flaked chile, coconut milk, basil, slivered onion, and a highly aromatic curry powder.
  • Post #50 - March 16th, 2006, 3:03 pm
    Post #50 - March 16th, 2006, 3:03 pm Post #50 - March 16th, 2006, 3:03 pm
    Any string of roomates from college to the present has ridiculed me for my breakfast habits. Generally speaking, I like leftovers for breakfast. And I will only eat them cold. (Cold pizza, cold pasta, a left over portion of steak or pork, beans of any variety, anything really...). Perhaps this stems from the fact that breakfast was a do-it-yourself endeavor in my house. If I was up early enough, my Dad and I would have baloney sandwiches for breakfast (sometimes fried if the old coot was in a good mood).

    Any American style breakfasts were the result of visiting Grandpa on Sunday. He cooked a full Irish brekkie every morning (which is not that different from the all-American standard).

    If I had sardines or chub or lox in the fridge, I would eat it for breakfast. Usually, I have an assortment of cured meat and cheese on hand in case there are no leftovers.

    I will say that if someone is so kind as to offer to make me breakfast, I will enjoy any type of breakfast food and be very thankful.
  • Post #51 - July 4th, 2006, 9:55 am
    Post #51 - July 4th, 2006, 9:55 am Post #51 - July 4th, 2006, 9:55 am
    LTH,

    I'll answer the obvious question first, yes, the wife and I had a wee drop of the Irish last night, were feeling peckish on the way home and, low and behold, White Castle appeared as if in a vision. :)

    Of course we ordered way too many, though some might say one is way too many, so sliders for breakfast. A more demure presentation of regular Sliders and Eggs for Ellen.

    Image

    Slider 'Chilaquiles' made with jalapeno cheese sliders with additional fresh jalapeno added to the mix for myself.

    Image

    Looks like I'm good on Sliders until 2008, I can only handle them once every couple of years. :)

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Sauce on the side, always, implied, axiomatic..........never a doubt, BBQ sauce without.

    Low & Slow
  • Post #52 - July 4th, 2006, 9:59 am
    Post #52 - July 4th, 2006, 9:59 am Post #52 - July 4th, 2006, 9:59 am
    G Wiv wrote:
    Slider 'Chilaquiles' made with jalapeno cheese sliders with additional fresh jalapeno added to the mix for myself.



    Now that's gross :shock: :? :roll: :wink:
  • Post #53 - July 4th, 2006, 10:06 am
    Post #53 - July 4th, 2006, 10:06 am Post #53 - July 4th, 2006, 10:06 am
    G Wiv wrote:A more demure presentation of regular Sliders and Eggs for Ellen.
    ....
    Slider 'Chilaquiles' made with jalapeno cheese sliders with additional fresh jalapeno added to the mix for myself.


    Gary,

    The eggs and yellow tomatoes with Texas Pete looks terrific!

    Best,
    Michael
  • Post #54 - July 4th, 2006, 11:08 am
    Post #54 - July 4th, 2006, 11:08 am Post #54 - July 4th, 2006, 11:08 am
    Sour Trahanás with Tahini, Mint and Dried Green Chile

    This dish, which I invented this past winter, like several other variations on the theme that I've come up with over the years, is good any time but I like it for breakfast, especially on mornings after having played hockey late the previous night.

    Image


    Instructions for preparation.

    • Fry a small bit of garlic in olive oil; allow oil to cool briefly. Add water and a little salt. Bring to a boil.

    • Add trahanás and allow to cook until done (a couple of minutes). Turn off heat.

    • Stir in a teaspoon of tahini into the trahanás. Transfer to bowl.

    • Finish the dish with some freshly ground black pepper, chopped fresh mint (or parsley or other fresh herb that you have on hand) and a generous dressing of high quality extra virgin olive oil. On this occasion I also added some dried green chile flakes from New Mexico (muy picante!).

    • Eat.

    Antonius



    Links to other recipes and cooking notes by this writer: http://lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.php?p=55649#55649
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #55 - July 4th, 2006, 12:06 pm
    Post #55 - July 4th, 2006, 12:06 pm Post #55 - July 4th, 2006, 12:06 pm
    While camping in the Smokey Mountains we stopped a a local grocery store and found this delicacy...

    Image

    While suggested to be mixed with scrambled eggs my wife has had them chunked, breaded and fried.

    Somewhat bland according to her.

    (Time to toss them as the can is bulging)
  • Post #56 - July 4th, 2006, 11:11 pm
    Post #56 - July 4th, 2006, 11:11 pm Post #56 - July 4th, 2006, 11:11 pm
    G Wiv wrote:Slider 'Chilaquiles' made with jalapeno cheese sliders with additional fresh jalapeno added to the mix for myself.

    Thanks for the grin! Looks much tastier than slider stuffing.
  • Post #57 - March 27th, 2007, 7:37 am
    Post #57 - March 27th, 2007, 7:37 am Post #57 - March 27th, 2007, 7:37 am
    Best thing about making risotto for dinner, risotto cakes and eggs for breakfast.

    Image
    Sauce on the side, always, implied, axiomatic..........never a doubt, BBQ sauce without.

    Low & Slow
  • Post #58 - September 30th, 2008, 9:40 am
    Post #58 - September 30th, 2008, 9:40 am Post #58 - September 30th, 2008, 9:40 am
    LTH,

    Hungry and pressed for time for a morning meeting in Pilsen a pork chop sandwich from Jim's Original provided the perfect antidote for growling belly.

    Jim's Original

    Image

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    Jim's Original Hot Dog
    1250 S Union Ave
    Chicago, IL 60607
    312-733-7820
    Sauce on the side, always, implied, axiomatic..........never a doubt, BBQ sauce without.

    Low & Slow
  • Post #59 - September 30th, 2008, 10:48 pm
    Post #59 - September 30th, 2008, 10:48 pm Post #59 - September 30th, 2008, 10:48 pm
    When you are in the proper mood -- or condition -- it's tough to beat a DIY Double-Fish-With-Jalapeno-Cheese-And-Pickles at White Castle, for breakfast.

    First, buy an even number of Regular (not doubles) Fish-With-Cheese sandwiches and specify: 1) jalapeno cheese; and 2) pickles; and 3) tartar sauce. Then, at the table, take two sandwiches and remove either two or three of the bun-halves (depending on your preference for proper bun-to-fish balance). Re-assemble the two fish cakes, each with their own cheese slice (very important) onto one bun-half. Top with a second bun-half or omit the second one and eat it open-face (for the daintier, low-carb experience, of course).

    I prefer to remove the pickles and eat them at my own pace, rather than trusting the "luck of the draw" in every bite. Sometimes, you just want the combination of fish, spicy cheese and tartar sauce taste, sans pickle.

    Please refer to the first line in this post -- it definitely helps to NEED this sandwich.
  • Post #60 - October 1st, 2008, 11:31 am
    Post #60 - October 1st, 2008, 11:31 am Post #60 - October 1st, 2008, 11:31 am
    If I'm dragged to a buffet, I will avoid all the pancake, french toast, blintzes, eggs, and other "traditional" breakfast crapola, and instead load my plate with cheeses, proscioutto, pickles, capers, and salmon--and hope I can get some rye toast.

    Buffet tip (besides not going in the first place): NEVER eat a bagel from a buffet. They're always terrible, there's a preponderance of cinnamon-raisin (so gross an idea and taste profile it's not even worth discussing), and--worst of all--the stack of bagels invariably causes some toppling, with one or two always hitting the floor. These are typically not thrown away, and re-stacked by the staff when they think no one's looking.
    See, I'm an idea man, Chuck. I got ideas coming at me all day. Hey, I got it! Take LIVE tuna fish and FEED 'em mayonnaise!

    -Michael Keaton's character in Night Shift

Contact

About

Team

Advertize

Close

Chat

Articles

Guide

Events

more