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Foodie Films [culinary movie]

Foodie Films [culinary movie]
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  • Post #181 - January 10th, 2015, 2:46 am
    Post #181 - January 10th, 2015, 2:46 am Post #181 - January 10th, 2015, 2:46 am
    Today's movie was "The Search for General Tao".

    This 73 minute documentary travels around the globe looking for the origins of the Chinese-American dish, General Tao's Chicken. While doing this, they meet a wide variety of characters and a lot of interesting stories.

    While that is a laudable goal, this film really addresses why Chinese -American food differs so much from food in China. It also addresses why there are Chinese restaurants in even the most remote locations in the US. It addresses why you see so many non-English speaking employees in those restaurants.

    It is well worth the effort to find this movie.

    This evening's movie was the One Hundred Foot Journey but that was covered above.
  • Post #182 - January 10th, 2015, 8:24 am
    Post #182 - January 10th, 2015, 8:24 am Post #182 - January 10th, 2015, 8:24 am
    jlawrence01 wrote:Today's movie was "The Search for General Tao".

    This 73 minute documentary travels around the globe looking for the origins of the Chinese-American dish, General Tao's Chicken. While doing this, they meet a wide variety of characters and a lot of interesting stories.

    While that is a laudable goal, this film really addresses why Chinese -American food differs so much from food in China. It also addresses why there are Chinese restaurants in even the most remote locations in the US. It addresses why you see so many non-English speaking employees in those restaurants.

    It is well worth the effort to find this movie.

    This evening's movie was the One Hundred Foot Journey but that was covered above.

    http://www.thesearchforgeneraltso.com/ - website shows VOD options.
    "Sandwiches are wonderful. You don't need a spoon or a plate!"
    Paul Lynde
  • Post #183 - May 13th, 2017, 8:04 am
    Post #183 - May 13th, 2017, 8:04 am Post #183 - May 13th, 2017, 8:04 am
    James Beard: America’s First Foodie

    “James Beard: America’s First Foodie” is a feature length documentary about, James Beard. Beard, the man the New York Times dubbed the “Dean of American Cookery,”

    https://americasfirstfoodie.com/
    "Sandwiches are wonderful. You don't need a spoon or a plate!"
    Paul Lynde
  • Post #184 - August 5th, 2017, 1:25 pm
    Post #184 - August 5th, 2017, 1:25 pm Post #184 - August 5th, 2017, 1:25 pm
    Let me add the award-winning films of animated shorts master, PES: https://pesfilm.com/

    And I recently watched two Japanese food related‎ projects. One was Midnight Diner: Tokyo Stories, a Netflix series currently streaming. An unnamed man has a small late-night  eatery where a dish has an emotional significance to each episode. The dishes appear simple and basic but like much of Japanese food, the flavors, texture and presentation is done well.

    The other was Little Forest: Summer /Autumn.
    ‎A 20-something woman lives alone in a rural part of Japan where she grows and forages and makes from scratch all her food. Each dish is highlighted and shown as she is preparing it, several dishes per episode. The contented sounds she makes as she eats makes you wish you were dining with her. Eventually a plot emerges about her relationship with her mother. Since the young woman depends on nature for food, the show has the seasonal aspect to it. (There are episodes for Winter / Spring.) Unfortunately this show is not widely available here and we were left on a cliffhanger, hopefully I can find the other episodes to watch at the Japan Info Center. It is based on a manga and a Korean version is planned.
  • Post #185 - August 11th, 2017, 1:28 pm
    Post #185 - August 11th, 2017, 1:28 pm Post #185 - August 11th, 2017, 1:28 pm
    Barbecue is an interesting look at international barbecue and how people do things around the world when cooking food over a fire (or buried in a fire pit), a good representation of countries and methods (although some may be stretching it a little to define how barbecue food is made, at least in a modern day sense).

    Barbecue (Netflix, available August 15)
    From director Matthew Salleh and producers Rose Tucker and Daniel Joyce, this documentary dives into various fire-based-cooking cultures around the world. Salleh takes viewers on a trip to 12 different countries and examines their barbecue traditions. The director hopes to tell a story that reaches far beyond food and instead explains how “something as basic as cooking over fire unites us across race, class, and culture in increasingly uncertain times.” Barbecue premiered as a Documentary Spotlight selection at the South by Southwest film festival in March.

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