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Post your Favorite YouTube Food Centric Channels

Post your Favorite YouTube Food Centric Channels
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  • Post your Favorite YouTube Food Centric Channels

    Post #1 - August 7th, 2016, 8:46 pm
    Post #1 - August 7th, 2016, 8:46 pm Post #1 - August 7th, 2016, 8:46 pm
    Reading the Food Tripping with Molly thread reminded me to post a few YouTube food centric channels I've been digging.

    Almazan Kitchen, set in Serbia, incredible scenery, interesting sophisticated outdoor cookery. Rustic, lighthearted, presented in a surprisingly polished fashion for the rural setting.
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVVAnx ... lc7QfPA2YQ

    Scott Rea Project, butcher doing a wide range of butchery and old school recipes from his "shed" in England. Everything from breaking down whole animals to coq au vin to stuffed pigs head. Surprisingly accessible, fun to watch with solid info. One can actually learn a thing or two.
    https://www.youtube.com/user/TheScottReaproject

    Food Ranger, kind of a dweeb, but terrific locations and food shots. Focus on Asia, mainly China with quite a bit shot in Chengdu.
    https://www.youtube.com/user/thefoodranger/featured
    Sauce on the side, always, implied, axiomatic..........never a doubt, BBQ sauce without.

    Low & Slow
  • Post #2 - August 7th, 2016, 9:30 pm
    Post #2 - August 7th, 2016, 9:30 pm Post #2 - August 7th, 2016, 9:30 pm
    Migrationology, fellow Sun Devil Mark Wiens's very entertaining globe-trotting non-stop eating channel. Interesting guy - here's his LinkedIn page.
  • Post #3 - August 7th, 2016, 11:35 pm
    Post #3 - August 7th, 2016, 11:35 pm Post #3 - August 7th, 2016, 11:35 pm
    sundevilpeg wrote:Migrationology, fellow Sun Devil Mark Wiens's very entertaining globe-trotting non-stop eating channel. Interesting guy - here's his LinkedIn page.


    Mark Wiens has some pretty good YouTube videos. Sometimes, his mannerisms are very irritating BUT he really does find some obscure places in Thailand. Of course, it does help that he is the son of missionaries and has a Thai wife who can negotiate in the native tongue.

    While we are on the subject of Asian food, I would recommend the Fung Brothers - two Vietnamese-American brothers located in the San Gabriel Valley of Los Angeles. They have a wide coverage of Southeast Asian food in SoCal. Do realize that their content is about 40% food and they generally recruit friends to join them when they are trying Asian cuisine other than Vietnamese.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/FungBrosComedy/videos

    Also, I have exchanged a number of ideas with the folks at Strictly Dumpling. Mike covers mostly the Chinese cuisines in and around Flushing, NY and has some very interesting commentary. I will note that he has been traveling through the south trying spicy chicken and BBQ. His content is about 90% food. He used to be a contributor to the Off the Great Wall channel but that channel has dropped off recently.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/strictlydumpling

    Cooking with Dog is very interesting although I understand only about 60% of what is going on in most episodes. It is a channel that you MUST see to believe.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/cookingwithdog

    My "go to" channel for cooking videos is Food Wishes. I am not saying this guy has the best cooking videos nor the most interesting. However, he does show some interesting techniques.

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRIZtP ... Xc9btSTQNw


    Disclosure: I do not have a television and rely upon YouTube for about 75% of my entertainment.
  • Post #4 - August 8th, 2016, 9:43 am
    Post #4 - August 8th, 2016, 9:43 am Post #4 - August 8th, 2016, 9:43 am
    Although this one hasn't been updated in a while, Maria Wong aka wantanmien https://www.youtube.com/user/wantanmien provides easy to follow and very clear instructions on Cantonese snacks and dishes. She also has some European/Westernized-style dishes since she lives (I think) in Germany. Her videos also include closed captions in English with recipe measurements.
  • Post #5 - August 9th, 2016, 7:19 am
    Post #5 - August 9th, 2016, 7:19 am Post #5 - August 9th, 2016, 7:19 am
    Maangchi
    Maangchi is a bubbly Korean home cook that teaches you how to cook traditional korean dishes. Her bubbly personality and love for food come through in her popular videos on youtube.
    https://www.youtube.com/user/Maangchi/featured
    http://www.maangchi.com/

    Seonkyoung Longest - Asian At Home
    Seonkyoung Longest is a Korean born chef that was previously on food network competition show called Restaurant Express in which she won as a self taught chef. On her channel she shows how to cook many asian traditional and fusion dishes.
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIvA9Z ... 2e0DZtvxzw

    KBDProductionsTV
    This channel is by Ken Domik in which he trys various fast food restaurants and there offerings and gives his honest reviews.
    https://www.youtube.com/user/KBDProductionsTV/videos
  • Post #6 - August 19th, 2016, 2:45 am
    Post #6 - August 19th, 2016, 2:45 am Post #6 - August 19th, 2016, 2:45 am
    Here is a pretty authentic video of the old-fashioned techniques of slaughtering a hog. Unfortunately, it stops with a split hog.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IXbQpvXsxKs

    They have a few other hog related videos.
  • Post #7 - October 11th, 2016, 2:38 pm
    Post #7 - October 11th, 2016, 2:38 pm Post #7 - October 11th, 2016, 2:38 pm
    jlawrence01 wrote:My "go to" channel for cooking videos is Food Wishes. I am not saying this guy has the best cooking videos nor the most interesting. However, he does show some interesting techniques.

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRIZtP ... Xc9btSTQNw


    I love Food Wishes; I think the best thing about it is that he always shows his mistakes, explains what happened or why he did it that way, and how to correct it.
    "I've always thought pastrami was the most sensuous of the salted cured meats."
  • Post #8 - May 4th, 2017, 6:27 pm
    Post #8 - May 4th, 2017, 6:27 pm Post #8 - May 4th, 2017, 6:27 pm
    In 2007, one of the oddest and most delicious channels on YouTube launched with a short, lo-fi video on how to make Japanese hot-pot-style soup. “Today, I will show you how to cook sukiyaki,” a male voice narrates, in accented English, over a shot of lightly simmering beef broth. Then the camera pans, abruptly, to a closeup of a poodle. “Hello, I am the host of this show, ‘Cooking with Dog,’ ” the male voice—we realize now it is the dog’s—continues, as the camera surveys his poofy hairdo and frilly purple collar. “O.K., let’s get started.” When the camera zooms out, the dog is perched beside a stove, and a middle-aged woman in a pink shirt begins following his cooking instructions.

    http://www.newyorker.com/culture/rabbit ... -the-grave
    "Sandwiches are wonderful. You don't need a spoon or a plate!"
    Paul Lynde
  • Post #9 - May 4th, 2017, 10:36 pm
    Post #9 - May 4th, 2017, 10:36 pm Post #9 - May 4th, 2017, 10:36 pm
    Hi,

    A few years ago, The Dog's Chef was in an accident. Filming was suspended for perhaps two months. Their facebook page offered updates on her health. I am sure its been a hard adjustment without Francis, the dog.

    Julia Child was very fond of cats. One of her cats in France would sit on a stool overseeing her efforts. In her television show filmed at her home, there was always a likeness of a cat along the kitchen window.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #10 - May 5th, 2017, 1:24 am
    Post #10 - May 5th, 2017, 1:24 am Post #10 - May 5th, 2017, 1:24 am
    There were people who thought that the dog was fake as it remained so still.

    My recent You Tube find has been the Wolfe Pit. (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnJm8w ... n2piAt2WYg).

    His videos fall into three broad categories:

    1) Reviews of "cheap eats" found at the dollar stores. (What are we eating?)
    2) Reviews of unusual regional foods (What are we eating?)
    3) Recipes.

    While Larry Wolfe is no Julia Child, his videos are easy to follow and most of the food turns out pretty well.
  • Post #11 - May 5th, 2017, 5:09 pm
    Post #11 - May 5th, 2017, 5:09 pm Post #11 - May 5th, 2017, 5:09 pm
    Several favorites already named above (Maangchi, Strictly Dumpling). But there are so many to choose from.

    As a fan of history, I love Jas. Townsend and Son 18th Century Cooking - covers everything from indoor to outdoor cooking, soldier to slave to posh, and identifies the sources. Also often cooks on location at historic sites. Great fun -- and a lot of the food looks really delicious. https://youtu.be/GsyjNef2ydQ

    I rather like the chaps at River Cottage: https://youtu.be/ZMkdYKfO9gg

    Nyonya Cooking is fun if you are seeking Malaysian cooking.
    https://youtu.be/DOfia0O4qbk

    Of course, there are all the old Jacques Pépin cooking shows -- hundreds of them -- so never at a loss for something to watch.

    Too many to name them all, but these are a few of my regulars.
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #12 - May 6th, 2017, 12:46 am
    Post #12 - May 6th, 2017, 12:46 am Post #12 - May 6th, 2017, 12:46 am
    Don't want to forget -- not a cooking show, but definitely food-centric, is the British series Supersizers. There are several seasons worth on YouTube, all called either The Supersizers Eat... or The Supersizers Go... -- and food critic Giles and his comic performer friend Sue set off through 500 years of British history and then 2000 years of Western history, dressing and living and, most importantly, eating as is appropriate for each era. While Giles and Sue ham it up a bit, the show features historians, writers, politicians, reporters, and various other experts, as well as top chefs, all charged with teaching everything possible about the food of each era. It's a real hoot -- education as fun. The "Supersizers" aspect is that they get check-ups at the beginning of each week and then at the end of a week of living on whatever the era had on offer, to see what the impact was on their health. There are foods that are cringe-worthy but also lots of things that make you wish they published a cookbook. Here's the first section of the episode on Regency England. https://youtu.be/TCfx98Ei5lM
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #13 - May 11th, 2017, 10:49 am
    Post #13 - May 11th, 2017, 10:49 am Post #13 - May 11th, 2017, 10:49 am
    Cynthia, where did you find all those old Jacques Pépin videos you mention? Any time I go looking for his stuff, I end up at KQED's gate, where they ask me for money... not that I don't think they're entitled to do so (although I *do* have PBS Passport, and I should have hoped that would give me a passport to Jacques!).

    I think he is a delight, our Jacques P. !!

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #14 - May 11th, 2017, 11:34 am
    Post #14 - May 11th, 2017, 11:34 am Post #14 - May 11th, 2017, 11:34 am
    Geo, I either google "youtube jacques pepin" or go straight to YouTube and search there. Many full episodes are on YouTube. If you're looking for a specific dish, the KQED website can be useful for finding the episode number and using it in your YouTube search.

    If I had to pick only one chef's shows to watch on a desert island, it would be Jacques Pepín!
    "I would gladly pay you Tuesday for a hamburger today."
  • Post #15 - May 11th, 2017, 11:48 am
    Post #15 - May 11th, 2017, 11:48 am Post #15 - May 11th, 2017, 11:48 am
    Tnx Katie, good intel!

    Katie says: If I had to pick only one chef's shows to watch on a desert island, it would be Jacques Pepín!


    Absolutely! couldn't agree more! My buddy Tim, the Restaurant King of Seattle (IMHO!) loves him, says he's the best knife in the biz.

    When I was up for an award at the International Association of Culinary Professionals a few years ago, Pépin was the featured speaker. I got to sit about ten feet from him, which was really exciting, and an honour. And, amazingly enough, his accent seems even thicker in Real Life than it does on tv! : )

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #16 - May 11th, 2017, 12:27 pm
    Post #16 - May 11th, 2017, 12:27 pm Post #16 - May 11th, 2017, 12:27 pm
    I'm slightly diverting this thread, so I'll be quick. Last night I found Japanese Style Originator on Netflix, a panel/variety show from Japan. It appears to have a wide range of topics, but I watched episode 13, which was about the top 50 things to put over rice. Super-interesting stuff.
  • Post #17 - May 11th, 2017, 12:30 pm
    Post #17 - May 11th, 2017, 12:30 pm Post #17 - May 11th, 2017, 12:30 pm
    Geo, have you read this essay? The Chef Who Saved My Life. I love it.
    "I would gladly pay you Tuesday for a hamburger today."
  • Post #18 - May 11th, 2017, 1:24 pm
    Post #18 - May 11th, 2017, 1:24 pm Post #18 - May 11th, 2017, 1:24 pm
    Yes, I've read it before, Katie; simply lovely story, it was well worth it to read again. Tnx for the opportunity!

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #19 - May 11th, 2017, 4:22 pm
    Post #19 - May 11th, 2017, 4:22 pm Post #19 - May 11th, 2017, 4:22 pm
    Geo wrote:Cynthia, where did you find all those old Jacques Pépin videos you mention? Any time I go looking for his stuff, I end up at KQED's gate, where they ask me for money... not that I don't think they're entitled to do so (although I *do* have PBS Passport, and I should have hoped that would give me a passport to Jacques!).

    I think he is a delight, our Jacques P. !!

    Geo


    Don't Google Jacques. Just go to YouTube and request Jacques Pépin there. Hundreds of videos will come up. Most will say they were posted by KQED, but they don't take you to the KQED site -- they just show you the video (plus a few ads from the people who make it possible for them to post without donations on YouTube).
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #20 - May 11th, 2017, 4:24 pm
    Post #20 - May 11th, 2017, 4:24 pm Post #20 - May 11th, 2017, 4:24 pm
    Ah -- I see Katie beat me to the punch. Yes -- just go straight to YouTube. And search any other chef you've ever heard of. Graham Kerr, Gordon Ramsey, Julia Child, Nigella Lawson -- they're all out there. (Not comparable to Jacques, of course, but still useful.)
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #21 - May 26th, 2017, 11:44 pm
    Post #21 - May 26th, 2017, 11:44 pm Post #21 - May 26th, 2017, 11:44 pm
    I think that I have posted ten or twelve YouTube channels on this thread already. There is not one that I would remove.

    However, the YouTube channel that has influenced my home cooking in recent weeks has been Hot Thai Kitchen https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC27C_HWo-UmKkdWGsRJZ8EA.

    From her website:
    Pailin “Pai” Chongchitnant is the author of the Hot Thai Kitchen cookbook, co-host of a Canadian TV series One World Kitchen on Gusto TV, and creator and host of the YouTube channel Pailin's Kitchen.

    Pai was born and raised in southern Thailand where she spent much of her "playtime" in the kitchen. She traveled to Canada to study Nutritional Sciences at the University of British Columbia, and was later trained as a chef at Le Cordon Bleu culinary school in San Francisco.

    In addition to showing how to prepare a wide variety of dishes, she discusses a lot of the reasons why she is using each ingredient and how you can and cannot substitute others in the preparation of the recipe. She spends a lot of time explaining Thai ingredients and why each one of them is used and what each contributes to the final product.

    I have learned a lot about Thai cooking as well as other kitchen skills from her although I have watched less than 20% of the content that she has on YouTube.

    She has collaborated with Mark Weins on a couple of videos. Mark Weins is a pretty fair cook when he is at home and has demonstrated good cooking skills. However, he is more of a home cook. Pailin will produce the same dish as Mark but will make subtle differences in technique which will yield a more polished dish.

    Some of the things I have learned include:

    The use of cilantro stems and roots
    How to prepare a soft boiled egg in the microwave
    The differences between Thai basil and Wholly basil
    The different soy sauces, fish sauces, and the like
    The use of the mortar and pestle

    And, the videos are a great watch.
  • Post #22 - July 21st, 2017, 3:10 pm
    Post #22 - July 21st, 2017, 3:10 pm Post #22 - July 21st, 2017, 3:10 pm
    I've become a fan of Sous Vide Everything.

    It's obvious that they love what they're doing, and that a lot of it is straight trial & error experimentation (with the results available for everyone to see).
    "I've always thought pastrami was the most sensuous of the salted cured meats."

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