LTH Home

Artisan cheese open houses--monthly in 2012

Artisan cheese open houses--monthly in 2012
  • Forum HomePost Reply BackTop
  • Artisan cheese open houses--monthly in 2012

    Post #1 - November 9th, 2007, 1:04 am
    Post #1 - November 9th, 2007, 1:04 am Post #1 - November 9th, 2007, 1:04 am

    The Great American Cheese Collection supplies fine, artisan-made, small-batch cheeses to lots of Chicago's top restaurants. Some gourmet stores offer a small grouping of these cheeses, often farmstead-produced from sustainable or organic milk supplies. Nobody else offers the kind of variety for sale at these bi-weekly open houses.

    For more info: Redefining 'American cheese'

    The Great American Cheese Collection wrote:Cheese at our Warehouse!! Come and get it for Thanksgiving!!

    We are at it again. Every other Saturday. Our warehouse is open to you.

    When: November 10th and 24th

    December 8th and 22nd

    What time: 8 am to Noon

    Where: At our warehouse
    4727 S. Talman , Chicago (between Western and California Avenues)

    Parking: Lots of free street parking
    Contact us that day for directions and info: 773-519-5055, 773-835-5055



    The Great American Cheese Collection is back with:

    Fresh Mozzarella and Burrata

    Amish Swiss and Baby Swiss Cheeses

    Pineland Farms Monterey Jacks and Cheddars

    Lazy Lady goat cheeses

    Rivers Edge goats cheeses

    MouCo ColoRouge, Camembert and BLU

    Parmesan, Romano, Provolone, Pepato from Armando Ferrari

    Blue Cheeses

    Stinky Cheeses

    Soft and Creamy Cheeses

    Aged and Intense Cheeses

    Fresh Goat Cheese

    Cow, Goat and Sheep Milk Cheeses

    Spicy Cheeses – Jalapeno, Chipotle, Smoked Salsa

    Energy Bars

    Sunset Bay – a creamy goat milk cheese with a bloomy rind and a center layer of smoked Spanish paprika

    Humbug Mountain – an ultra creamy goat milk pyramid with black peppercorns. Amazing with red wines

    St Olga - an aged, semi-firm goat milk cheese with a washed, yeast rind. Slightly assertive, fresh clean, “meaty”; creamy mouth-feel; long finish

    Vermont Blue – a double cream Holstein cow milk cheese; earthy, musty, pungent ; big flavors and a huge finish

    Rapture – a Jersey cow milk soft cheese; washed rind and then wrapped in grape leaves.

    Hopeful Tomme – a blend of goat and Jersey cow milks ; semi firm ; creamy and flavorful ; from Sweet Grass Dairy in Thomasville, GA

    Pennsylvania Noble Mature – an Amish cheddar made in the style of a French Cantal; organic, green, farmstead, etc.

    Fresh Bocconcini Mozzarella – cherry tomato sized


    Also available:

    Stivers Fresh Roasted Coffees

    Elena’s Fresh Tamales and Lalo’s Salsas, Chicken Mixiotes

    Artopolis Breads – traditional baguette; baguette with various seed toppings; whole grain loaves; salt pretzels
    Last edited by LAZ on January 13th, 2012, 8:43 am, edited 9 times in total.
  • Post #2 - November 9th, 2007, 2:48 pm
    Post #2 - November 9th, 2007, 2:48 pm Post #2 - November 9th, 2007, 2:48 pm
    This sounds great. Can anyone tell me of any good places for breakfast in the area? I'll be coming from Naperville and need to bribe my husband (the driver).
  • Post #3 - November 10th, 2007, 6:55 am
    Post #3 - November 10th, 2007, 6:55 am Post #3 - November 10th, 2007, 6:55 am
    This thread might give you some ideas. Abundance Bakery at 105 E. 47th, for example; 27 blocks away isn't very close to the cheese warehouse by city standards, but by the standards of coming from Naperville it is.
  • Post #4 - November 11th, 2007, 3:16 pm
    Post #4 - November 11th, 2007, 3:16 pm Post #4 - November 11th, 2007, 3:16 pm
    We wound up eating at Cafe 28 since it didn't look like there were many options in the area and we added a few other items to our list of things to buy in the city. Thanks for posting this event. The cheese was great and I'm sure that I'll be back on Dec. 22 to stock up for Christmas entertaining!
  • Post #5 - January 19th, 2008, 5:23 am
    Post #5 - January 19th, 2008, 5:23 am Post #5 - January 19th, 2008, 5:23 am
    According to e-mail from Great American Cheese, the cheese open houses are continuing in 2008.

    Dates: Jan. 19, Feb. 2, Feb. 16, March 1, March 15, March 22
    with new hours, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.


    4727 S. Talman, Chicago (between Western and California avenues)

    Day of sale directions and info:
    773-519-5055
    773-835-5055

    Payment: Cash, Check, Credit card

    Here are a few photos I snapped in December:

    Image Image

    Image Image

    Image Image

    Taste and then cruise the racks in our warehouse for much more. All for sale at "wholesale" pricing.

    More DEALS !!

    ZOTA Organic Soda Pops will be on sale: Orange and Lemon
    $10.00 for a 12-pack ( regular store price is $18.00 )

    ***

    NEW STUFF

    KC Goodies
    Handmade / Homemade Doggie Treats
    Judy Goodman has got treats for your "doggie baby"

    The Great American Cheese Collection is back with:

    Timberdoodle – a washed rind cow milk from Woodcock Farms in Vermont, creamy, flavorful, slightly "stinky"
    Magic Mountain – an aged sheep milk cheese from Woodcock Farms
    La Fleurie – a double cream cow milk "camembert" from Willow Hill in Vermont
    Pennsylvania Noble "TRIO" Tasting – made from spring milk of 2007; made from winter milk of 2006 ; and, made from spring milk of 2005. Amish cheddar made in the style of a French Cantal ; organic, green, farmstead, etc
    White Cheddar Curds – fried curds for the holidays? Make your own Poutine ?
    Fresh Mozzarella Ovaline and Bocconcini
    Burrata – fresh mozzarella stuffed with curd and cream
    Affumicate – delicately smoked mozzarella – terrific for pizza, panini, and more
    Raw Milk Amish Swiss and Baby Swiss Cheeses – natural and wood smoked
    Pineland Farms Monterey Jacks and Cheddars – Smoked Salsa Jack
    Lazy Lady goat cheeses
    Figaro – camembert topped with figs and dates
    Cranberries and Cream – camembert topped with cranberries, cream and white wine
    Buck Hill Sunshine – washed rind stinky cheese
    Rivers Edge goats cheeses
    Hearts Desire – camembert with smoked paprika
    Up In Smoke – fresh goat wrapped in smoked maple leaf
    Siletz River Drum – soft, gooey, full flavored crottin
    Sunset Bay – smooth and creamy goat milk cheese ; fine line of smoked Spanish paprika in the center ; rubbed with ash on the outside just beneath the bloomy rind
    Saint Olga – aged "stinky" goat cheese
    ColoRouge - a red rind yeast washed camembert ; beautifully stinky/sweet
    Aged Raw Milk Parmesan, Romano, Provolone, Pepato from Armando Ferrari
    Juniper Grove – Oregon – Goat Pyramids – very French in style; big flavors

    "Winter Blues" Cheeses
    Berkshire Blue
    Mindoro Blue
    Mindoro Gorgonzola
    Vermont Blue
    Black Ledge Blue
    Maytag Blue
    Dolcelatte Gorgonzola – natural rind; ULTRA creamy

    NEW
    Black and Blue – a semi-soft goat milk cheese from FireFly Farms ; soft and Creamy; earthy; "meaty”"; big flavors with a big finish for a big red wine
    Hooligan – a washed rind stinky monastery style cheese from Connecticut
    Holy Cow – triple cream cow milk from Louisiana
    Feliciana Nevat – an ultra creamy goat and cow blend cheese from Bitter Sweet
    Aged and Intense Cheeses – raw cow milk gouda, goat parmesan, 6 and 9 Year Cheddars, goat gruyere
    Fresh Goat Cheese
    Spicy Cheeses – Jalapeno, Chipotle, Smoked Salsa
    Tarentaise – a French style gruyere from Vermont; best ever
    Humbug Mountain – an ultra creamy goat milk pyramid with black peppercorns. Amazing with red wines
    Vermont Blue – a double cream Holstein cow milk cheese; earthy, musty, Pungent ; big flavors and a huge finish
    Hopeful Tomme – a blend of goat and Jersey cow milks ; semi firm ; creamy and flavorful ; from Sweet Grass Dairy in Thomasville, GA
    Tumalo Tomme – a delicious, meaty aged goat cheese from Oregon
    La Fleurie – triple cream camembert from Willow Hill in Vermont; ripe; gooey; silky; bursting with delicious flavor

    Also: Sicilian Olive Oils from Maria Koch, a small batch estate producer; Matcha Japanese Green Tea; Stivers Fresh Roasted Coffees; Elena's Fresh Tamales and Lalo's Salsas -- Chicken mixiotes, Mexican hot chocolate, tamales (beef, pork, chicken, cheese); Artopolis Breads.

    Thanks to all those who have helped make these tastings known and successful ... LTH Forum....
  • Post #6 - February 2nd, 2008, 1:55 pm
    Post #6 - February 2nd, 2008, 1:55 pm Post #6 - February 2nd, 2008, 1:55 pm
    Immense thanks to LAZ form posting about this, as I am so glad to have discovered it. A wide array of unique, delicious cheeses combined with a passionate business owner who knows his stuff, and a certain back-alley "insider" feel to the warehouse room we were in really made this special. The artisan olive oils were also terrific - especially the basil oil which was a much needed taste of summer on this snowy weekend. I also was happy to try Stiver's Coffee (locally owned and roasted on the south side of Chicago) for the first time, and thought the Nicaraguan Organic blend was rich and nicely balanced. The place is really a gem, and I look forward to returning before the winter season ends.
  • Post #7 - February 4th, 2008, 10:25 am
    Post #7 - February 4th, 2008, 10:25 am Post #7 - February 4th, 2008, 10:25 am
    Is anyone coming to the 16thFebruary cheese day?
    Let me know it would be great to have another foodie and lth forum person there.
    Cookie Monster
  • Post #8 - February 4th, 2008, 11:19 am
    Post #8 - February 4th, 2008, 11:19 am Post #8 - February 4th, 2008, 11:19 am
    I will very likely be there again on the 16th and as many of the remaining dates as I can possibly make.
  • Post #9 - October 19th, 2008, 11:15 pm
    Post #9 - October 19th, 2008, 11:15 pm Post #9 - October 19th, 2008, 11:15 pm
    The Great American Cheese Warehouse is now open every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
  • Post #10 - August 5th, 2009, 3:17 pm
    Post #10 - August 5th, 2009, 3:17 pm Post #10 - August 5th, 2009, 3:17 pm
    The Great American Cheese Collection, in addition to Saturday warehous hours, will be at the Pilsen Community Farmers' Market Sundays from 9am to 2pm.

    Corner of 18th and Halsted in the bank parking lot.
    For details go to: http://www.pilsencommunitymarket.org
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #11 - September 26th, 2009, 11:30 pm
    Post #11 - September 26th, 2009, 11:30 pm Post #11 - September 26th, 2009, 11:30 pm
    This afternoon, the first three cheeses I tried at The American Cheese Collection were three of the best cheeses I've had in the past year. Just excellent: Black Ledge Blue, an 11-year old cheddar, and a candy-like goat gouda (called, coyly, "Goata").
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #12 - October 3rd, 2009, 4:47 pm
    Post #12 - October 3rd, 2009, 4:47 pm Post #12 - October 3rd, 2009, 4:47 pm
    As part of South Side Saturday (http://www.lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.php?f=19&t=26146) Happy Stomach, BryanZ, Dansch and I visited the Great American Cheese Collection. With the demise of the Cheese Stands Alone, the GACC has the most interesting selection of cheese in Chicagoland. Located, as noted, in a warehouse, the place has a forlorn industrial charm. The front room is filled with interesting cheese from artisanal producers from all over the US, and included today a range of cheese from a Burata to a Wild Rice Gouda to an 11-year old cheddar, and some amazing blues - and a candy-like fig "sausage", marinated in red wine with nuts and spices. We were given taste after taste after taste - triple creme, "stinky" cheese, elegant goat cheese. Until GACC gets discovered, it is an experience all its own.

    GACC seems a natural for a future GNR Resource award.
    Toast, as every breakfaster knows, isn't really about the quality of the bread or how it's sliced or even the toaster. For man cannot live by toast alone. It's all about the butter. -- Adam Gopnik
  • Post #13 - October 3rd, 2009, 5:26 pm
    Post #13 - October 3rd, 2009, 5:26 pm Post #13 - October 3rd, 2009, 5:26 pm
    GAF wrote:As part of South Side Saturday (http://www.lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.php?f=19&t=26146) Happy Stomach, BryanZ, Dansch and I visited the Great American Cheese Collection. With the demise of the Cheese Stands Alone, the GACC has the most interesting selection of cheese in Chicagoland. Located, as noted, in a warehouse, the place has a forlorn industrial charm. The front room is filled with interesting cheese from artisanal producers from all over the US, and included today a range of cheese from a Burata to a Wild Rice Gouda to an 11-year old cheddar, and some amazing blues - and a candy-like fig "sausage", marinated in red wine with nuts and spices. We were given taste after taste after taste - triple creme, "stinky" cheese, elegant goat cheese. Until GACC gets discovered, it is an experience all its own.

    GACC seems a natural for a future GNR Resource award.


    Oh, yeah, I agree. GNR Resource most definitely (though my nomination may be the kiss of death, :twisted: :wink: , so I'll leave that to another).

    Sula wrote of a fig sausage recently, but I'm not sure it's the same -- sounds like an excellent accompaniment for cheese.

    Had a taste of the Wild Rice Gouda, and was unmoved, but the 11-year old cheddar and one of the blues, had them for lunch, and they knocked me out, again.
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #14 - October 3rd, 2009, 5:38 pm
    Post #14 - October 3rd, 2009, 5:38 pm Post #14 - October 3rd, 2009, 5:38 pm
    Sula's description of the "fig salami" in the Reader was of the same product. Here is his description http://www.chicagoreader.com/TheBlog/archives/2009/09/28/one-bite-fig-salumi

    Just the difference in description between a professional journalist and one of those damn bloggers. :lol:
    Toast, as every breakfaster knows, isn't really about the quality of the bread or how it's sliced or even the toaster. For man cannot live by toast alone. It's all about the butter. -- Adam Gopnik
  • Post #15 - October 5th, 2009, 9:05 am
    Post #15 - October 5th, 2009, 9:05 am Post #15 - October 5th, 2009, 9:05 am
    From our visit on Saturday, just a couple of shots:

    Domestic Burrata (can't recall the producer's name...)
    Image

    GAF Contemplating the Wares
    Image

    -Dan
  • Post #16 - October 6th, 2009, 8:21 pm
    Post #16 - October 6th, 2009, 8:21 pm Post #16 - October 6th, 2009, 8:21 pm
    This is an interesting spot. That's for sure. It's totally unexpected, totally neighborhood. Arriving at the place sets the tone for something new.

    The cheeses here are solid, but here's where I'm going to post a couple dissenting opinions. Although the setup has a certain industrial-chic appeal, I didn't find it necessarily better than what one can get at Whole Foods or Wegmans (I'm not sure they have the latter out here). I enjoyed how I could sample to my heart's content, so that was fun, but I wasn't floored with the quality of the cheeses. I do believe that there are excellent American cheese producers out there. I'm not sure they're represented in this collection. These are good, but don't hold a candle to what you'd find in any decent cheese shop in Europe.

    Furthermore, while I'm willing to (grudgingly) concede that disliking pungent cheeses isn't a major character flaw for the layperson, I would argue that as a cheese salesperson it is. The woman we interacted with was nothing but nice and generous, but her knowledge of cheese wasn't particularly inspiring. Describing a camembert as perfect for a baked brie may well be true, but that's not the level that I was looking to engage at. I'm trying not to be pretentious here, but if you position yourself as a serious distributor of small-production American cheeses you better know about the production methods, the producers, the aging, etc.

    I enjoyed visiting this place, don't get me wrong. I just think that those people looking to find an encyclopedic fromager presiding over a collection of ridiculous cheeses won't be super impressed.
  • Post #17 - October 6th, 2009, 8:47 pm
    Post #17 - October 6th, 2009, 8:47 pm Post #17 - October 6th, 2009, 8:47 pm
    BryanZ wrote:Although the setup has a certain industrial-chic appeal, I didn't find it necessarily better than what one can get at Whole Foods or Wegmans (I'm not sure they have the latter out here).


    There is nothing remotely chic about this place.

    It's tough to argue "better," but suffice it to say that here, cheese is not routinely pre-cut, which does make a difference.

    BryanZ wrote:Furthermore, while I'm willing to (grudgingly) concede that disliking pungent cheeses isn't a major character flaw for the layperson, I would argue that as a cheese salesperson it is. The woman we interacted with was nothing but nice and generous, but her knowledge of cheese wasn't particularly inspiring.


    I'm guessing you interacted with Linda. A nice person, to be sure, but me to you, bro, who cares what she knows? You have a lot of knowledge about cheese. You have a palate. Use 'em. I don't need someone talking up cheese to me. I put it in my mouth. I taste it. I know if I like it or not.
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #18 - October 6th, 2009, 9:13 pm
    Post #18 - October 6th, 2009, 9:13 pm Post #18 - October 6th, 2009, 9:13 pm
    It's chic in an ironic sense?

    You raise fair points. I guess I've reluctantly sipped upon the Kool-Aid that says that every artisanally produced food product should have some story behind it. I like the idea of getting an education with my consumption, but it does come down to the taste. On the other side of that coin, however, I could also certainly research any cheese I was interested in myself. Bottom line: interesting place in the most unlikely of locations with some pretty solid cheese and a couple nice items if you're willing to taste around--very much enjoyed the 11-year cheddar. Overall, it's hard to ask for more, but the place isn't like Cheese Mecca for me.
  • Post #19 - October 6th, 2009, 9:28 pm
    Post #19 - October 6th, 2009, 9:28 pm Post #19 - October 6th, 2009, 9:28 pm
    BryanZ wrote:every artisanally produced food product should have some story behind it.


    I actually buy into that notion in a big way.

    I think, though, when the prices are so reasonable, that something has got to give, and that something might be cheesemonger expertise. Still, if Linda is actually the person we're talking about, I found her quite informative in a gut level kind of way...and she did lead me to some very tasty cheeses, including the 11-year old cheddar you mention, which I also liked a lot.
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #20 - October 6th, 2009, 9:36 pm
    Post #20 - October 6th, 2009, 9:36 pm Post #20 - October 6th, 2009, 9:36 pm
    This is a small business, doing these open houses as a sideline to a wholesale trade that supplies cheese shops and many fine restaurants. Linda is the bookkeeper, not a cheese expert -- she's just there helping out. If you want a cheese education, talk to Giles. He'll tell you everything you want to know, and more.

    If you want slicker surroundings and urbane salesmen, you can buy the same cheese from the pricey stores that buy them from Giles.
  • Post #21 - October 6th, 2009, 9:46 pm
    Post #21 - October 6th, 2009, 9:46 pm Post #21 - October 6th, 2009, 9:46 pm
    Although I can't compare prices, these were certainly not bargain-basement prices. They didn't seem much cheaper than The Cheese Stands Alone, if I recall correctly. And GACC does not have the selection of CSA, at least so far as hard cheeses.

    Perhaps I am wrong, but I am not sure that the prices are cheaper than the prices sold to restaurants. Someone can correct me if I am wrong.

    Still their Fig Salami and 11-year old cheddar made it all good.
    Toast, as every breakfaster knows, isn't really about the quality of the bread or how it's sliced or even the toaster. For man cannot live by toast alone. It's all about the butter. -- Adam Gopnik
  • Post #22 - October 7th, 2009, 5:23 am
    Post #22 - October 7th, 2009, 5:23 am Post #22 - October 7th, 2009, 5:23 am
    GAF wrote:Although I can't compare prices, these were certainly not bargain-basement prices. They didn't seem much cheaper than The Cheese Stands Alone, if I recall correctly. And GACC does not have the selection of CSA, at least so far as hard cheeses.

    Perhaps I am wrong, but I am not sure that the prices are cheaper than the prices sold to restaurants. Someone can correct me if I am wrong.

    Still their Fig Salami and 11-year old cheddar made it all good.


    It is hard to compare prices of different cheeses, but all I can say is that I was surprised at how much excellent cheese we were able to purchase for a very reasonable price. We're planning to return to Giles for cheese during the holidays because of the value he offers.
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #23 - October 7th, 2009, 10:01 am
    Post #23 - October 7th, 2009, 10:01 am Post #23 - October 7th, 2009, 10:01 am
    I can't remember the name of the woman who helped us - perhaps it was Linda - but I do recall that she was exceedingly friendly, warm, happy to help however she could, and seemed genuinely excited to have us there. While she didn't explain each cheese in-depth, she did seem very familiar with all of the cheeses on offer when we asked questions or asked for something along particular lines.

    Last night I stopped by the Whole Foods on Halsted to pick up various items, including a piece of cheese. The young woman behind the counter (who's name I've also forgotten) was also extremely friendly, warm, happy to help - and much more knowledgeable about cheese. So what? That certainly didn't diminish my experience at GACC.

    GACC was a unique experience and one that I would heartily recommend to others.

    -Dan
  • Post #24 - October 7th, 2009, 10:04 am
    Post #24 - October 7th, 2009, 10:04 am Post #24 - October 7th, 2009, 10:04 am
    BryanZ's point about Linda's "major character flaw" as a cheesemonger of not liking pungent cheeses actually reminded me of an interesting topic GAF brought up later that day (something from his research, I believe) . His point was that often times food service professionals are expected to be able to produce and judge food which they really don't like (either as a matter of personal taste or lack of cultural/family link to that food).

    It's an interesting situation where a person has to be able to taste a foodstuff and say "I don't like this at all, but it's exactly as it should be for my customer's palate" or "I don't like this at all and won't even when it's right, but I can tell that it needs a bit more X"

    -Dan
  • Post #25 - October 7th, 2009, 12:12 pm
    Post #25 - October 7th, 2009, 12:12 pm Post #25 - October 7th, 2009, 12:12 pm
    dansch wrote:BryanZ's point about Linda's "major character flaw" as a cheesemonger of not liking pungent cheeses actually reminded me of an interesting topic GAF brought up later that day (something from his research, I believe) . His point was that often times food service professionals are expected to be able to produce and judge food which they really don't like (either as a matter of personal taste or lack of cultural/family link to that food).

    It's an interesting situation where a person has to be able to taste a foodstuff and say "I don't like this at all, but it's exactly as it should be for my customer's palate" or "I don't like this at all and won't even when it's right, but I can tell that it needs a bit more X"

    -Dan


    I wanted to mention this, too, but feel like it's an entirely separate discussion. Should read GAF's book, then I'll be able to comment more fully.
  • Post #26 - March 26th, 2010, 11:30 pm
    Post #26 - March 26th, 2010, 11:30 pm Post #26 - March 26th, 2010, 11:30 pm
    At 11 a.m. today, they'll be grilling cheddarwurst made from 2-year-old cheddar by chefs at the downtown Marriott.
  • Post #27 - September 9th, 2011, 7:54 pm
    Post #27 - September 9th, 2011, 7:54 pm Post #27 - September 9th, 2011, 7:54 pm
    No open house tomorrow.
  • Post #28 - September 9th, 2011, 9:11 pm
    Post #28 - September 9th, 2011, 9:11 pm Post #28 - September 9th, 2011, 9:11 pm
    LAZ wrote:No open house tomorrow.


    More importantly: No open house again until October.

    From an email today:
    What: Saturday Cheese Tasting at Our Ware House
    When: Canceled this week
    Time : Canceled this week
    Where: 4727 S. Talman, Chicago
    Cost: FREE
    Questions: 773-519-5055

    This week we will be canceling the warehouse tasting
    We will be back the first Saturday of October

    with new hours from 11 AM to 2 PM

  • Post #29 - January 6th, 2012, 3:25 am
    Post #29 - January 6th, 2012, 3:25 am Post #29 - January 6th, 2012, 3:25 am
    Giles Schnierle has scaled his warehouse sales back to monthly, the first Saturday of each month; the next one's this Saturday, Jan. 7, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Besides cheese, there's barbecue, Ream's Elburn Market meats, Bridgeport pasties and more.

    More details.

Contact

About

Team

Advertize

Close

Chat

Articles

Guide

Events

more