LTH Home

That's-A-Burger (71st / Jeffery)

That's-A-Burger (71st / Jeffery)
  • Forum HomePost Reply BackTop
     Page 1 of 2
  • That's-A-Burger (71st / Jeffery)

    Post #1 - June 1st, 2004, 2:10 am
    Post #1 - June 1st, 2004, 2:10 am Post #1 - June 1st, 2004, 2:10 am
    "A forty-five minute wait for a fuckin' turkey burger. Tell you what, next time you want a turkey burger, you get your fat ass out and get it yourself."

    Such are the phone conversations overheard at That's-A-Burger. The first Saturday I stopped in I was told the wait would be about 35 minutes. I couldn't stay and returned a week later. This time it was 45 minutes. I was lucky because some people ahead of me had been waiting over an hour. During my wait I had a chance to talk with plenty of That's-A-Burger fanatics. One had driven 20 miles from the far south suburbs specifically for a turkey burger. Another stops weekly for a hamburger. That's-A-Burger, having been in business for 20 years this fall, is no secret to many but to my knowledge it hasn't gotten a lot of press.

    The menu looks long but in reality is quite simple: beef burgers or turkey burgers (or doubles) with about a half-dozen extra charge options such as cheese, chili or bacon. Burgers come with your choice of mustard, ketchup, pickle, grilled or raw onion, lettuce (coarsely chopped iceberg), and tomato (by request only). Prices range from $3.15 for a basic hamburger with fries to somewhat over $5 for the exotica. Recently, a 30 cent per patty surcharge has been added. Polish sausages and a soy-based veggie burger are also available though I can't recall hearing them ordered.

    Everything is made to order and at their pace. Ray Kroc likely would have been driven insane watching this operation. At any given moment there may be only 4 or 5 burgers cooking but each gets the individual attention it deserves. A fist-sized ball of ground meat is tossed on the griddle and mashed down with the spatula into an irregular patty. After it's flipped and the edges char a bit, cheese and grilled onions are laid on. When it's properly cooked--I don't think there is any such thing as a rare burger here--it's carried over to the other side of the kitchen where the rolls are toasted and final assembly takes place. Before wrapping, a handful of fresh-cut, skin-on fries are tossed in next to the burger.

    This is one great burger, among the best in Chicago. Especially considering the price, I have yet to find an equal anywhere in Chicago. It's a completely different style from Smith & Wollensky's burger (probably my favorite in Chicago), more similar to that from Kevin's Hamburger Heaven. It's large'about six inches in diameter and maybe half an inch thick--and probably weighs in at nearly a half pound before cooking. It's juicy but not excessively greasy and tastes like a burger should. If you need a char-broiled burger or blue cheese this isn't the place.

    Don't overlook the turkey burgers! I'm usually not a huge fan but these are excellent. They taste strongly of turkey and have a sage-based seasoning, different from the hamburgers. I'm very fond of the turkey burger with Swiss cheese, grilled onions, and dill pickle slices.

    Back to the exotica. The more adventurous can try the Whammy Burger, a cheeseburger with a split Polish on top (Seth, you reading this?). Or maybe the 4N1, a chili-cheese-bacon-egg burger (that's practically a Slinger on a bun!). So far I've been more than happy with the basics but one of these days when I'm feeling brave I suppose I'll have to tackle a Whammy Burger.

    One problem with TAB is there's nowhere to eat, not even a counter. Probably the best approach is to run to the car and eat immediately. Everything gets wrapped up together so the fries tend to steam and get soggy. That's a shame because they're very fine fries. A little time in the wrapper doesn't seem to hurt the burgers as much, in fact it helps to meld the flavors a bit.

    This is yet another great old-fashioned South Side burger. That's-A-Burger can easily stand among the likes of Top Notch Beefburger Shop, Grant's Wonderburger, and Kevin's Hamburger Heaven.

    That's-A-Burger
    2134 E 71st St
    Chicago
    773-493-2080 (Good luck! Not always answered.)
    Tue-Thu 11am-7pm, Fri-Sat 11am-8pm

    That's-A-Burger is easily accessible by public transportation. CTA #71 bus (from Red Line-69th) stops across the street. Or the #14 Express from downtown stops 2 blocks west (Jeffery & 71st) as does the Metra Electric (Bryn Mawr stop).

    Top Notch Beefburger Shop
    2116 W 95th St

    Grant's Wonderburger
    11045 S Kedzie Av

    Kevin's Hamburger Heaven
    554 W Pershing Rd
  • Post #2 - April 3rd, 2005, 8:11 pm
    Post #2 - April 3rd, 2005, 8:11 pm Post #2 - April 3rd, 2005, 8:11 pm
    Almost a year ago I reported on That’s-A-Burger but didn’t get much response. Here’s a second helping in the hope that some burger aficionados will try what I think is one of the best spots in Chicago. When you factor in cost—$3.45 for a hamburger with fries—I can’t think of many places that come close. The skin-on fries (dusted with seasoned salt unless requested otherwise) are quite good too.

    The menu has expanded slightly but it’s highly focused on burgers, either beef or turkey. There’s only one size—large, nearly half a pound—but doubles are available. Although simply ordering a burger with everything will get you a fine specimen, part of the fun is trying new combinations. The standard “everything” is onions (specify raw and/or grilled), lettuce, dill pickle, mustard, and ketchup. Extra charge items include peppers (sports, jalapenos, or giardiniera), cheese (American, Swiss, or Cheddar), chili, bacon, or a fried egg. Here are a few combinations that I particularly enjoy.

    Center panel of That’s-A-Burger’s window
    Image

    Hamburger with fried egg, tomato, grilled and raw onion, and sport peppers
    Image
    The basic hamburger is excellent but some extras make it even better. I’ve become fond of adding a fried egg (additional 0.45). Even though the tomato is your typical Chicago winter variety, it adds some pleasant juice and flavor (there is no extra charge for tomato but it must be specifically requested when ordering). My favorite eggburger order omits the raw onion (grilled only) and peppers and adds mustard.

    Cheeseburger with chili, grilled and raw onion, and sport peppers
    Image
    This is my favorite when I’m in the mood for something sloppy. A generous topping of chili makes it a drippy, tasty mess (add 0.45 to the $3.65 cheeseburger price plus another 0.35 for peppers). They often run out of chili by afternoon but sometimes have turkey chili available (I believe this photo shows the turkey chili). Both contain beans, detracting only a bit.

    Don’t overlook the turkey burgers!
    Image

    Turkey burger with grilled onion, lettuce, pickles, and mustard
    Image
    I don’t order turkey burgers at most places but these are really good. Adding a slice of Swiss cheese is nice and I imagine some bacon wouldn’t hurt either.

    Whammy burger (cheeseburger and split Polish sausage) with grilled and raw onion, sport peppers, and mustard
    Image
    If a half pound of beef isn’t enough, why not top it with some cheese and a gigantic grilled Polish sausage? I finally worked up the courage to try one and it’s not bad at all but to be honest I think I’d prefer the parts served separately. The last time I was at TAB, a gentleman of a certain size ordered a Whammy Burger with fried egg, mayo, sport peppers and “all the cheeses.” That’s out of my league though I was impressed enough to congratulate him on his order.

    That’s-A-Burger
    2134 E 71st St
    Chicago
    773-493-2080
    Tue-Sat 11am-7pm
    Take out only
  • Post #3 - April 3rd, 2005, 8:15 pm
    Post #3 - April 3rd, 2005, 8:15 pm Post #3 - April 3rd, 2005, 8:15 pm
    Long Live the Whammy Burger! Looks like I have to add a new place to my list.
  • Post #4 - April 3rd, 2005, 8:26 pm
    Post #4 - April 3rd, 2005, 8:26 pm Post #4 - April 3rd, 2005, 8:26 pm
    Hi,

    Give a man a camera who already has a way with words and his posts just sparkle so much more!

    ReneG wrote:If a half pound of beef isn’t enough, why not top it with some cheese and a gigantic grilled Polish sausage? I finally worked up the courage to try one and it’s not bad at all but to be honest I think I’d prefer the parts served separately.


    This statement reminds me of Mr. Scala's comments at Culinary Historians when asked about Italian Sausage and Beef combo sandwiches. He preferred them as separate sandwiches as well.

    Thanks for the post and for alerting us to the hours 11 AM - 7 PM! Not a destination for a midnight snack.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #5 - April 3rd, 2005, 8:28 pm
    Post #5 - April 3rd, 2005, 8:28 pm Post #5 - April 3rd, 2005, 8:28 pm
    Rene G wrote:Almost a year ago I reported on That’s-A-Burger but didn’t get much response. Here’s a second helping in the hope that some burger aficionados will try what I think is one of the best spots in Chicago.


    I think those photos will surely have the desired effect, even if I can't quite fathom putting a fried egg on a burger :lol: But I'm already thinking that's not a bad run from south Oak Park. Maybe combine it with some mini golf at Haunted Trails.

    Edited to note that in fact it's nowhere near south South Oak Park or Haunted Trails because that's EAST 71st St. Oh well.
  • Post #6 - April 3rd, 2005, 8:52 pm
    Post #6 - April 3rd, 2005, 8:52 pm Post #6 - April 3rd, 2005, 8:52 pm
    Ann,

    You really should write the book on great cheap dates! That is a winning combination of food and fun.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #7 - April 3rd, 2005, 9:03 pm
    Post #7 - April 3rd, 2005, 9:03 pm Post #7 - April 3rd, 2005, 9:03 pm
    Rene,
    I don't know if you live close to TAB but I was wondering how a burger going to the Ukrainian Village would hold up. I imagine the fried egg would be best eaten as soon as possible. Is there a park or somewhere to eat outside nearby? I am anxious to go as soon as I determine how to best devour my Whammy burger with egg.
    Thanks,
    Thomas
  • Post #8 - April 3rd, 2005, 9:09 pm
    Post #8 - April 3rd, 2005, 9:09 pm Post #8 - April 3rd, 2005, 9:09 pm
    Thanks for the reminder. I'm especially intrigued by the anarchic symbolism that TAB has chosen.

    Do you think Jimmy's would beef about bringing in a burger, seeing as they make them (they still do right?)?
  • Post #9 - April 3rd, 2005, 9:14 pm
    Post #9 - April 3rd, 2005, 9:14 pm Post #9 - April 3rd, 2005, 9:14 pm
    I've heard that the owner of That's-A-Burger wants to bring a location to Hyde Park, a neighborhood that has been largely free of good burgers at least since I moved here in 2002.

    YIPPEE!!!
  • Post #10 - April 3rd, 2005, 9:48 pm
    Post #10 - April 3rd, 2005, 9:48 pm Post #10 - April 3rd, 2005, 9:48 pm
    YourPalWill wrote:Long Live the Whammy Burger! Looks like I have to add a new place to my list.

    Don’t overlook the T.A.B. Special either! I forgot to mention that since last year the 4N1 has been renamed. It consists of a burger topped with cheese, chili, bacon, and egg. The other day a few of us tried to order one but they were out of chili (not an uncommon problem) so we got the eggburger shown in the photo.

    Cathy2 wrote: Thanks for the post and for alerting us to the hours 11 AM - 7 PM! Not a destination for a midnight snack.

    It can also be a problem going at peak hours. As I mentioned in my original post, waits of up to an hour can be expected. The woman who takes the orders usually overstates the wait times, however. I should probably mention that cameras will be highly unwelcome inside.

    Ann Fisher wrote:. . . I can't quite fathom putting a fried egg on a burger But I'm already thinking that's not a bad run from south Oak Park. Maybe combine it with some mini golf at Haunted Trails.

    After a nasty eggburger experience at the Billy Goat years ago I was skeptical too. But I was pleasantly surprised. Even though That’s-A-Burger isn’t very close to Oak Park it’s very near the South Shore Cultural Center (the old South Shore Country Club), well worth a look. The main gate of SSCC is at the east end of 71st Street, about 2 or 3 blocks east of TAB.

    Thomas D wrote: Is there a park or somewhere to eat outside nearby?

    Well, the SSCC would be nice (in nice weather). If you’re driving, I’d say just eat in your car. If you take Metra (Electric line, Bryn Mawr stop; you can see the reflection of the overhead wires in the photograph of TAB’s window) the stop is about 2 blocks west. I think there are some outside benches at the station where you could eat while you wait for the train. Also note the CTA #14 express bus is convenient from the Loop. There is absolutely no place to eat inside That’s-A-Burger.

    JeffB wrote:I'm especially intrigued by the anarchic symbolism that TAB has chosen.

    Do you think Jimmy's would beef about bringing in a burger, seeing as they make them (they still do right?)?

    Yup, I noticed the circled Aand it was also pointed out by another LTHer last week. Given the owner’s choice of radio stations, I’d say it’s purely a coincidence.

    Jimmy’s still serves burgers but I’m pretty sure they don’t care if you bring food in if you buy drinks and don’t make a mess. That used to be their policy but it wouldn’t hurt to call and ask (let us know if you find out).

    Evan B Druce wrote: I've heard that the owner of That's-A-Burger wants to bring a location to Hyde Park . . .

    I wasn’t going to mention it but, yes, I heard that too from “a reliable source.” Don’t know how definite it is but it sure would be good for Hyde Park.
  • Post #11 - April 4th, 2005, 7:41 am
    Post #11 - April 4th, 2005, 7:41 am Post #11 - April 4th, 2005, 7:41 am
    Looks like the anarchist of burgers to me.
  • Post #12 - April 4th, 2005, 3:01 pm
    Post #12 - April 4th, 2005, 3:01 pm Post #12 - April 4th, 2005, 3:01 pm
    G Man

    Gave your post a quick once-over this morning as I was going out the door to an appointment at 77th and King Dr. My intention after the sales call was to grab a whammy burger, head to the lakefront and peacefully sleep off my lunch.

    As luck would have it my eyeballs stopped reading as soon as I jotted down the address and I arrived to find the burgler bars locked tight :( as TAB is closed on Monday.

    Visually this place has very little going for it and would be easily (dis)missed. Thanks for the great post. TAB in now on my southside lunch list.

    JSM
  • Post #13 - April 5th, 2005, 4:22 am
    Post #13 - April 5th, 2005, 4:22 am Post #13 - April 5th, 2005, 4:22 am
    JSM wrote:Visually this place has very little going for it and would be easily (dis)missed. Thanks for the great post. TAB in now on my southside lunch list.

    JSM,

    Agreed, from the outside That's a Burger is unprepossessing, to say the least.
    Image

    Frankly, it's not much on the inside either, bullet proof glass, little contact with the people cooking and taking orders, and a simple wall mounted menu.
    Image

    Stark surroundings are forgotten with your first bite of a That's a Burger. The burger is made like a good burger should be, coarse ground meat, loosely packed and 75%, maybe even 70% lean ground beef. I got an almost buttery flavor from the burger, probably a combination of actual butter and 75% ground beef.
    Image

    Prices are highly reasonable, burgers are very good, and options seem almost endless, a Whammy Burger with Polish, egg, mayo and sport peppers seems hard to resist.

    Here's a picture I took of one of ReneG's old That's a Burger receipts. No real reason to post it aside from I like the picture, with the french fry and sport pepper holding it down from the wind. 8)
    Image

    ReneG thanks for the introduction to That's a Burger, though now I'll probably need a quadruple by-pass instead of triple. :)

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #14 - April 5th, 2005, 1:13 pm
    Post #14 - April 5th, 2005, 1:13 pm Post #14 - April 5th, 2005, 1:13 pm
    What a revelation I found That's A Burger.

    Alas, they didn't have eggs, so I couldn't order the TAB Special. In its place, I got the double burger, along with the Whammy Burger.

    Here are some images:

    Image

    The Double-Burger

    Image

    Total weight of Double-Burger (a little more than 1-1/4 lbs., which includes weight of bundled fries)

    Image

    Total weight of Double-Burger and Whammy Burger (almost 2-3/4 lbs., including weight of bundled fries)

    Cheers,
    Wade
    "Remember the Alamo? I do, with the very last swallow."
  • Post #15 - April 9th, 2005, 11:35 am
    Post #15 - April 9th, 2005, 11:35 am Post #15 - April 9th, 2005, 11:35 am
    I finally made it down to That's a Burger today. The pictures posted had made it a priority, but with their hours I had to wait until today. I stuck to a regular cheeseburger with everything. It was a very good, slightly greasy, fast food burger. I normally dont like pre-salted fries, but they didnt overdue it, could have been a little crisper. Now I am kicking myself for not trying the Whammy and getting it over with. I cant wait to go back. Thanks Rene G for the reminder.
  • Post #16 - November 4th, 2005, 6:54 pm
    Post #16 - November 4th, 2005, 6:54 pm Post #16 - November 4th, 2005, 6:54 pm
    JSM wrote:As luck would have it my eyeballs stopped reading as soon as I jotted down the address and I arrived to find the burgler bars locked tight as TAB is closed on Monday.

    Good news! Since October, That’s-A-Burger is keeping longer hours. They’re now open Mondays as well as a couple hours later on Fridays and Saturdays. The kitchen has been slightly remodeled but the burgers haven’t changed. I have yet to find a bigger, better burger in Chicago for the price ($3.45 with fries). I always enjoy the Egg Burger but don’t forget the Whammy Burger. . .

    That’s-A-Burger
    2134 E 71st St
    Chicago
    773-493-2080
    Mon-Thu 11am-7pm, Fri-Sat 11am-9pm
    Take out only

    Egg Burger from That’s-A-Burger
    Image
  • Post #17 - November 5th, 2005, 11:25 am
    Post #17 - November 5th, 2005, 11:25 am Post #17 - November 5th, 2005, 11:25 am
    Peter

    Thanks for the update. I was in the neighborhood just this past Wednesday but didn't stop as I had just had lunch at Tacos Del Pacifico.

    Next time for sure!

    JSM
  • Post #18 - April 20th, 2007, 2:17 pm
    Post #18 - April 20th, 2007, 2:17 pm Post #18 - April 20th, 2007, 2:17 pm
    I drove down to That's A Burger yesterday (Thursday night) at about 6 PM. The storefront is hard to find; I recommend taking Stony Island down to 71st and making a left so that you are on the south side of the train tracks, then turning making a U-turn at one of the yield signs right before South Shore Drive to head back west. You can then park easily right in front of the place at a meter.

    There was no line in the small space but I was warmly greeted by the owners, a pleasant middle-aged couple, from behind their bulletproof glass enclosure. I asked for a single hamburger with bacon, jalapenos, grilled onions, and ketchup and a coke, and the total was under $6. I was told to return in 15 minutes for the sandwich, so I went back to my car and listened to the Cubs pregame for a while, since there is no seating in the restaurant.

    When I picked up the sandwich it was piping hot, wrapped in white waxed paper within a paper bag. Surprisingly ungreasy, the inner package revealed a generous handful of seasoned fries, deliberately moist as opposed to crispy, which is characteristic of the South Side. The sandwich featured a generous 1/2 pound of buttery ground beef with a great steaky taste and aroma. Thick-cut bacon, chopped petals of grilled onions, and vinegary jalapeno peppers (you can also get giardinera, which I might try next time) offered a perfect contrast. The bun was very fresh, refined white flour with no seeds, untoasted, but offering just the right soft chew to offset the char of the beef and crispy edges of the bacon.

    I'd rate this the best stand-up buger I've ever had, matching the pleasure of my favorite sit-down affairs at Moody's (on a good night) and at Duke of Perth. I have been less thrilled with the consistency at Poag Mahone's and the Avenue in Oak Park, both of which can deliver a winner on some nights and a very standard sandwich on others. The bottom of my regularly visited spectrum are Twisted Spoke (get the pulled pork instead) and Goldyburger in Forest Park, which on multiple visits have only produced C+ or B- hamburgers for the price.

    I highly recommend the trek down to That's A Burger. Give that nice couple some business, see a beautiful old street (71st), and walk away with a smile. I found this photoblog describing a similar experience to mind:

    http://chicagoburgerproject.blogspot.com/2007/03/thats-burger.html
  • Post #19 - April 20th, 2007, 7:21 pm
    Post #19 - April 20th, 2007, 7:21 pm Post #19 - April 20th, 2007, 7:21 pm
    I meant to comment on this years ago, but since this post has been revived, I now can't resist. If you would like an exceptionally scenic place to enjoy your That's-a-Burger, head east on 71st Street and enter the South Shore Cultural Center. This used to be a Country Club but now it is a public park. When you drive in, veer to the left and follow the "Nature Sanctuary" signs. Park near the riding corral (the Chicago Police excericse their horses here) and you can either sit on the grassy lawn looking out at the beach, or venture south toward the nature sanctuary trail, just past the rotunda/70s lifeguard station. The sanctuary attracts all kinds of birds and insects (and bunnies) and the view of downtown is hard to beat. Last time I was there I saw a beaver swimming along the shoreline! In the summer they often have free jazz concerts on the lawn and Old Town does some free shows as well. This is one of thise hidden gems (just like TaB) that more Chicagoans need to check and enjoy.

    bjt
    "eating is an agricultural act" wendell berry
  • Post #20 - April 22nd, 2007, 12:01 pm
    Post #20 - April 22nd, 2007, 12:01 pm Post #20 - April 22nd, 2007, 12:01 pm
    Welcome, Santander, and congrats on being the rare first-timer to spawn a tagline (see here if it's no longer at the top of the page). Thanks also to Jim in Logan Square for calling my attention to it.
    Watch Sky Full of Bacon, the Chicago food HD podcast!
    New episode: Soil, Corn, Cows and Cheese
    Watch the Reader's James Beard Award-winning Key Ingredient here.
  • Post #21 - April 22nd, 2007, 1:17 pm
    Post #21 - April 22nd, 2007, 1:17 pm Post #21 - April 22nd, 2007, 1:17 pm
    Wow, how did I miss this thread until now. Unfortunately, I never really have a reason to head to that part of the city, so it might be a while until I make it there. But at some point in the next couple of months, it will happen!!
    "Fried chicken should unify us, as opposed to tearing us apart. " - Bomani Jones
  • Post #22 - April 23rd, 2007, 3:34 pm
    Post #22 - April 23rd, 2007, 3:34 pm Post #22 - April 23rd, 2007, 3:34 pm
    I drove down to That's A Burger yesterday (Thursday night) at about 6 PM. The storefront is hard to find; I recommend taking Stony Island down to 71st and making a left so that you are on the south side of the train tracks, then turning making a U-turn at one of the yield signs right before South Shore Drive to head back west. You can then park easily right in front of the place at a meter.


    Was at TAB a week ago myself - the above is almost exactly how I always
    get there (I usually take Cottage Grove, and then Stony Island, followed by
    a left on 71st). You dont actually *have* to make a U-turn - there is
    metered parking across the street too.


    When I picked up the sandwich it was piping hot, wrapped in white waxed paper within a paper bag. Surprisingly ungreasy, the inner package revealed a generous handful of seasoned fries, deliberately moist as opposed to crispy, which is characteristic of the South Side. The sandwich featured a generous 1/2 pound of buttery ground beef with a great steaky taste and aroma. Thick-cut bacon, chopped petals of grilled onions, and vinegary jalapeno peppers (you can also get giardinera, which I might try next time) offered a perfect contrast. The bun was very fresh, refined white flour with no seeds, untoasted, but offering just the right soft chew to offset the char of the beef and crispy edges of the bacon.

    I'd rate this the best stand-up buger I've ever had, matching the pleasure of my favorite sit-down affairs at Moody's (on a good night) and at Duke of Perth. I have been less thrilled with the consistency at Poag Mahone's and the Avenue in Oak Park, both of which can deliver a winner on some nights and a very standard sandwich on others. The bottom of my regularly visited spectrum are Twisted Spoke (get the pulled pork instead) and Goldyburger in Forest Park, which on multiple visits have only produced C+ or B- hamburgers for the price.


    While I do like the TAB burger a fair bit, I wouldnt rate it amongst my Top Three
    of all time :-) Even so, it *is* very good. Up on the north side... have you ever
    tried Paradise Pup? Not quite the sort of place that TAB is, but they too
    do a very fine (and similarly cheap) burger. For sit-downs, Jury's has drawn
    much praise here. A few weeks ago (after TOC's rec), I tried their #2
    "cheap burger" at Lion Head Pub (its a buck on Tuesdays, I was in the
    area about 4pm-ish and stopped in... it was a very quiet place at the
    time, and the burger was really pretty good).

    Would you say that TAB's single-burger is a 1/2 lb, BTW? Id have guessed
    smaller... maybe a third or so.

    I highly recommend the trek down to That's A Burger. Give that nice couple some business, see a beautiful old street (71st), and walk away with a smile. I found this photoblog describing a similar experience to mind:

    http://chicagoburgerproject.blogspot.co ... urger.html


    Id add my rec for TAB - a very nice burger. If you ever go at the "busy time",
    however, expect a wait - everything is cooked to order (as you saw), and
    its 10-15 minutes without anyone in line, usually (lots of phone-orders come
    in). At really busy times, its been up to a half hour - calling ahead may make
    sense. Or, if you want a snack while youre waiting, there's ia Harold's
    Chicken next door :-)

    Thanks to bjt in this thread too - will definitely try the Souith Shore Cultural
    Center next time for the TAB burger (better than eating in the car, which is
    what Ive done every time so far).

    c8w
  • Post #23 - April 24th, 2007, 5:40 pm
    Post #23 - April 24th, 2007, 5:40 pm Post #23 - April 24th, 2007, 5:40 pm
    I used to work in the area and TAB was a regular spot for me. In addition to their very good beef burger, they have the best turkey burger I've ever had. They also have a burger topped with a split polish sausage, which left one of my co-workers out of commission for a couple of days. Ordering ahead is always a good idea. Waits of 30-45 min are not uncommon during the lunch rush. But they often stop answering the phone when it gets busy, so it's a good idea to place your order relatively early in the day. They also take orders by fax. I really like this place.
  • Post #24 - April 24th, 2007, 5:59 pm
    Post #24 - April 24th, 2007, 5:59 pm Post #24 - April 24th, 2007, 5:59 pm
    Rene G wrote:I should probably mention that cameras will be highly unwelcome inside.

    Further explanation, please?
    What if the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about?
  • Post #25 - April 24th, 2007, 6:09 pm
    Post #25 - April 24th, 2007, 6:09 pm Post #25 - April 24th, 2007, 6:09 pm
    Cogito wrote:
    Rene G wrote:I should probably mention that cameras will be highly unwelcome inside.

    Further explanation, please?


    What further explanation is needed? Some places just don't like to be photographed.

    Best,
    Michael
  • Post #26 - April 24th, 2007, 6:43 pm
    Post #26 - April 24th, 2007, 6:43 pm Post #26 - April 24th, 2007, 6:43 pm
    eatchicago wrote:
    Cogito wrote:
    Rene G wrote:I should probably mention that cameras will be highly unwelcome inside.

    Further explanation, please?


    What further explanation is needed? Some places just don't like to be photographed.

    Best,
    Michael

    I wouldn't know since I haven't tried taking photos in restaurants. It just seemed odd. No offense intended. :roll:
    What if the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about?
  • Post #27 - April 24th, 2007, 7:12 pm
    Post #27 - April 24th, 2007, 7:12 pm Post #27 - April 24th, 2007, 7:12 pm
    It happens once in a while. Not often, but not unknown.
    Watch Sky Full of Bacon, the Chicago food HD podcast!
    New episode: Soil, Corn, Cows and Cheese
    Watch the Reader's James Beard Award-winning Key Ingredient here.
  • Post #28 - April 25th, 2007, 9:44 pm
    Post #28 - April 25th, 2007, 9:44 pm Post #28 - April 25th, 2007, 9:44 pm
    Cogito wrote:
    eatchicago wrote:
    Cogito wrote:
    Rene G wrote:I should probably mention that cameras will be highly unwelcome inside.

    Further explanation, please?


    What further explanation is needed? Some places just don't like to be photographed.

    Best,
    Michael

    I wouldn't know since I haven't tried taking photos in restaurants. It just seemed odd. No offense intended. :roll:


    I agree that it seems off if a public place, particularly a restaurant doesn't want to be photographed. It makes it seem like they have something to hide. My mind goes to health codes.
  • Post #29 - April 25th, 2007, 9:59 pm
    Post #29 - April 25th, 2007, 9:59 pm Post #29 - April 25th, 2007, 9:59 pm
    pugsley wrote:I agree that it seems off if a public place, particularly a restaurant doesn't want to be photographed. It makes it seem like they have something to hide. My mind goes to health codes.

    Pugsley,

    As someone who has taken thousands of pictures in restaurants I disagree. There are any number of reasons owners prefer you not take pictures in their restaurant, from simply being a somewhat idiosyncratic person, which I believe is the case with That’s-A-Burger, to not wanting style/technique copied by the competition, to just not liking the way they look in photos. Your jumping directly to health codes strikes me as vaguely irresponsible.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #30 - April 25th, 2007, 10:20 pm
    Post #30 - April 25th, 2007, 10:20 pm Post #30 - April 25th, 2007, 10:20 pm
    After I thought about it, I think I might know why they don't like cameras. The place has no seating, it's carry out only. Apparently the customers have to take care of all their ordering and pickup, etc., through the portals of their bulletproof glass windows. So, any photos taken are not going to be very appealing due to the nature of the environment. Also, using a flash would probably result in a lot of unpleasant reflections from the window, further deteriorating the quality of many photos. So, if it was my place, I don't think I'd want people taking photos under those constraints either. They would probably keep a lot of people from even trying the place. Just my opinion.
    What if the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about?

Contact

About

Team

Advertize

Close

Chat

Articles

Guide

Events

more