LTH Home

Charcoal Oven in Skokie

Charcoal Oven in Skokie
  • Forum HomePost Reply BackTop
    Page 2 of 3
  • Post #31 - June 2nd, 2006, 4:07 pm
    Post #31 - June 2nd, 2006, 4:07 pm Post #31 - June 2nd, 2006, 4:07 pm
    cooksaloteatsalot wrote:but if you aren't convinced his website: www.ejsplaceskokie.com is definitely worth looking at, it gives you an idea of the adequately high prices but has amazing pictures of the food. when you put your mouse over the small picture next to a menu item it pops up larger. its the sort of attention to detail that ej is known for and makes his food exceptional.
    Yeah, I have always felt that mouse rollover events on a restaurant's website are a good indicator of exceptional food. For example, check out the great rollover action on this website.
  • Post #32 - June 2nd, 2006, 4:15 pm
    Post #32 - June 2nd, 2006, 4:15 pm Post #32 - June 2nd, 2006, 4:15 pm
    Yeah, god, it always seems to be the worst restaurants that use rollover events.
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #33 - June 2nd, 2006, 4:17 pm
    Post #33 - June 2nd, 2006, 4:17 pm Post #33 - June 2nd, 2006, 4:17 pm
    if you are not impressed with the way the shrimp look than i have nothing to say- maybe i'm just into the simple touches but i think it completes the look the restaurant is trying to achieve.
    and that food in those pics really looks like that (its REAL!) as opposed to being painted and made from putty like micky d's food cosmetologists do.
  • Post #34 - June 2nd, 2006, 4:26 pm
    Post #34 - June 2nd, 2006, 4:26 pm Post #34 - June 2nd, 2006, 4:26 pm
    cooksaloteatsalot wrote:if you are not impressed with the way the shrimp look than i have nothing to say- maybe i'm just into the simple touches but i think it completes the look the restaurant is trying to achieve.
    I was not commenting on the pictures themselves (the shrimp ARE huge), just on the notion that the complexity of a website is an accurate predictor of food quality.
  • Post #35 - June 2nd, 2006, 4:43 pm
    Post #35 - June 2nd, 2006, 4:43 pm Post #35 - June 2nd, 2006, 4:43 pm
    Refutation of any correlation (except maybe an inverse one) between restaurant quality and website coolness:

    Website.

    Reality.

    Though I suppose you could say that the wildly excessive, but admittedly cool, overuse of Flash is a perfect representation of the restaurant experience.
    Watch Sky Full of Bacon, the Chicago food HD podcast!
    New episode: Soil, Corn, Cows and Cheese
    Watch the Reader's James Beard Award-winning Key Ingredient here.
  • Post #36 - June 2nd, 2006, 5:00 pm
    Post #36 - June 2nd, 2006, 5:00 pm Post #36 - June 2nd, 2006, 5:00 pm
    i know, i was just making a nod to the reliability and consistency, something most places lack. it means nothing, but i was glad to see it.
  • Post #37 - June 3rd, 2006, 1:02 am
    Post #37 - June 3rd, 2006, 1:02 am Post #37 - June 3rd, 2006, 1:02 am
    It would take a lot more than a cool web site to make me go back to E.J.'s.

    But I'd happily revisit Charcoal Oven.
  • Post #38 - June 3rd, 2006, 6:54 am
    Post #38 - June 3rd, 2006, 6:54 am Post #38 - June 3rd, 2006, 6:54 am
    LAZ wrote:It would take a lot more than a cool web site to make me go back to E.J.'s.


    Yeah, like a company platinum card, judging from the prices on that menu. Ouch!
    JiLS
  • Post #39 - July 1st, 2007, 7:42 pm
    Post #39 - July 1st, 2007, 7:42 pm Post #39 - July 1st, 2007, 7:42 pm
    After driving by for many years, the 'spouse and I decided to take advantage of a night of freedom – and, as we were limited by budget, opted for Charcoal Oven. Now, I do not intend to offend anyone - but really, the place does look like a set for the Godfather movies – so much so, that we began to think of it like a theme restaurant, which, as the evening progressed, oddly shifted to “Young Frankenstein." We were greeted by a very friendly young hostess (when I say young, I mean about our age – easily 40% younger than the majority in the restaurant) who instantly vanished, to be replaced with our waitress – Cloris Leachman as Frau Blucher. From across the room, she wordlessly pointed us in the direction of an empty booth without making eye contact. The dining room has sepulchrean flair, with elaborate but dim Victorian-style sconces. Black leather u-shaped booths line one wall, ending in columns that delineate a small party area towards the front door; each booth has its own shadowy sconce. The bar area on the opposite side is separated from the main room by mirrored paneling and dark wainscoting - in my mind, all that was missing was a band and a parquet dance floor.

    Delighted, we seated ourselves, and were silently handed handwritten menus containing specials from days of yore: shrimp scampi, pastitio, filet mignon, chicken or calves liver, and veal parmigiana. Occasionally, the younger hostess would stop by and break the atmosphere a bit, but by and large we were attended to by Frau Blucher. Drink orders were taken in a businesslike manner. The ‘spouse asked about the fish, and was informed with a deferential smile that nothing remained but trout for the evening. We settled on chicken livers for myself, and the evening's pork chop special for the ‘spouse. Our orders having thawed the waitress a bit, two cups of soup appeared in front of us. “Some nice lentil soup,” Frou Blucher clarified. She vanished for a moment, and reappeared suddenly with a plate containing two round breads, “Rolls.” quoth she, adding ominously “already cooked in butter!” She vanished again. At this point, we were almost giggling outright: the ‘spouse neighed under his breath, as her impersonation was uncanny, if completely unintentional.

    The house-made soup was hearty with carrots and lentils while the rich broth remained distinct. The rolls, as promised, were lightly fried in butter. We were then offered a “nice” salad, dark green lettuce topped with blood red tomatoes. Our dinners arrived shortly thereafter - let me say here that a frightening number of chickens were sacrificed to the cause. The large dinner plate was completely covered in a layer of perfectly-cooked livers on a bed of sautéed onion scented with thyme. Delicious. The ‘spouse received two gargantuan “America’s Cut” style pork chops, perfectly cooked though they were well over an inch thick – our evening’s sole complaint: they were a bit bland. Side dishes arrived family-style: perfectly steamed and otherwise unsullied asparagus (delicious) and hand made thick potato chips (equally good.)

    After wrestling manfully with our entrees, we requested boxes for the leftovers, at which point the Frau inquired after dessert. Options offered were apple pie, mixed berry pie, “nice chocolate cake” and rice pudding. We had a lovely, enormous slice of mostly strawberry pie – and when I say enormous, I should clarify that it was served in a large soup bowl and topped with what could only be described as a slab of vanilla ice cream. We also had a cereal bowl full of rice pudding. At this point, struggling for room to breathe, I had to cry uncle, and we left the rice pudding half-finished. It was very good, if topped a little heavily with cinnamon.

    True to earlier reports, a bag of tomatoes arrived with the check, which was about $75 for dinner with drinks and dessert (and two meals of leftovers.) We were sent on our way with instruction to let the tomatoes breathe, amused and sated.
    Last edited by Mhays on July 3rd, 2007, 9:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #40 - July 1st, 2007, 8:07 pm
    Post #40 - July 1st, 2007, 8:07 pm Post #40 - July 1st, 2007, 8:07 pm
    Wow. It's hard to believe it's still going strong. My mom and dad ate there when they were dating -- probably shortly after the place opened! (Not exactly like dining at some of Europe's 200-year-old spots, but old for this area.) I haven't eaten there in years, but your report makes me want to go back soon. Thanks for posting about it.
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #41 - July 2nd, 2007, 9:50 am
    Post #41 - July 2nd, 2007, 9:50 am Post #41 - July 2nd, 2007, 9:50 am
    If you liked Charcoal Oven you'd probably like Symphony's cafe in Evanston on Central. While not as extreme old time "Supper Club" of what sounds like the Charcoal Grill is, you get big portions of quality simple food at cheaper than average prices. The cliental can be older and I'm 50, but there is usually a mix of young people.

    I was positive I wouldn't like the place when I ate there for the first time but was very pleasantly surprised.

    http://chicagoitalianrestaurants.com/
  • Post #42 - July 2nd, 2007, 4:20 pm
    Post #42 - July 2nd, 2007, 4:20 pm Post #42 - July 2nd, 2007, 4:20 pm
    We also enjoyed Symphonys more than we expected - good bistro fare, if I recall. IMHO it feels positively modern in comparison to Charcoal Oven (certainly brighter :) ) Actually, I was going to mention that I'd consider Charcoal Oven to be a good substitute for RIP Gateway/My Place For. Many similar entrees, if in a unique vibe.
  • Post #43 - July 2nd, 2007, 6:03 pm
    Post #43 - July 2nd, 2007, 6:03 pm Post #43 - July 2nd, 2007, 6:03 pm
    EvanstonFoodGuy wrote:If you liked Charcoal Oven you'd probably like Symphony's cafe in Evanston on Central. While not as extreme old time "Supper Club" of what sounds like the Charcoal Grill is, you get big portions of quality simple food at cheaper than average prices. The cliental can be older and I'm 50, but there is usually a mix of young people.

    Wow. I've never been to Charcoal Oven, but I have been to Symphony's (for an omelet one morning), and from everything I've read about Charcoal Oven, the two places seem to be as alike as night and day. Or chalk and cheese, as the English say. Offhand, (and going from MHays' excellent description), I'd say the only thing the two places share in common is that they're both restaurants.
  • Post #44 - July 2nd, 2007, 6:24 pm
    Post #44 - July 2nd, 2007, 6:24 pm Post #44 - July 2nd, 2007, 6:24 pm
    Well, it is true that they're both relatively inexpensive, convenient to Evanston, and serve good food. Good dining options for the Northshore wallet-impaired.

    (thank you, riddlemay)
  • Post #45 - July 3rd, 2007, 6:56 am
    Post #45 - July 3rd, 2007, 6:56 am Post #45 - July 3rd, 2007, 6:56 am
    riddlemay wrote:
    EvanstonFoodGuy wrote:If you liked Charcoal Oven you'd probably like Symphony's cafe in Evanston on Central. While not as extreme old time "Supper Club" of what sounds like the Charcoal Grill is, you get big portions of quality simple food at cheaper than average prices. The cliental can be older and I'm 50, but there is usually a mix of young people.

    Wow. I've never been to Charcoal Oven, but I have been to Symphony's (for an omelet one morning), and from everything I've read about Charcoal Oven, the two places seem to be as alike as night and day. Or chalk and cheese, as the English say. Offhand, (and going from MHays' excellent description), I'd say the only thing the two places share in common is that they're both restaurants.


    Maybe not so much the ambience, I guess I was referring more to the good sized portions, dinner salad that comes with almost every meal, fresh food prepared simply, all at a fairly cheap price.

    And for whatever reason I feel it has a touch of that "Supper Club" feel, compared to other dinning places in Evanston.
  • Post #46 - October 14th, 2007, 8:17 pm
    Post #46 - October 14th, 2007, 8:17 pm Post #46 - October 14th, 2007, 8:17 pm
    I've been lurking and this is my first reply.

    My husband and I LOVE Charcoal Oven and we love it for some of the reasons that other posters don't like it. We really enjoy the 'weirdness' of the place but, actually, it's not scary at all. On our first visit, we asked the older gentleman (who hasn't been there very often on our recent visits) about some of the history of the place. He told us it's been there since Speakeasy days and was a stopping place for people traveling to Elgin. Back then Golf Rd. was a dirt road (and why people wanted to travel to Elgin escapes me....the clock factory perhaps?) My husband and I love historical places and this one fits the bill, plus the food is great, especially the seafood. This was the first place where we tried skate and it was fantastic.

    Anyway, 'Frau Blucher' is a very nice lady and sometimes her sister lurks in the bar area, she rarely comes into the dining room. Also, no one ever sits at the bar, it's just a resting place for Frau Blucher's sister, the booze and the tomatoes that everyone receives when paying their tab. Good tomatoes too! Nice, juicy Italian tomatoes.

    The food is always excellent (their blue cheese dressing is just about the best I've ever had). It's quiet and peaceful and Jim and I always go there for anniversaries, birthdays or whenever my disabled mother needs a break from her assisted living blandedness food.

    I just wanted to say something nice about Charcoal Oven because it's one of the places we like to go to when we want good food, and a quiet and somewhat amusing atmosphere.
  • Post #47 - October 15th, 2007, 11:13 am
    Post #47 - October 15th, 2007, 11:13 am Post #47 - October 15th, 2007, 11:13 am
    Welcome - and congratulations for de-lurking! Always good to hear another opinion.

    I wouldn't at all say we didn't like Charcoal Oven; our experience took us completely by surprise - I can't remember a better time had by the two of us in a restaurant (and the food was good, too! :) ) One thing I'd forgotten to mention that made the ambience - our evening was punctuated by a series of brown-outs, where the lights, briefly, would become even more dim and then suddenly come back. I don't know if that's a permanent feature...

    We really need to go back to celebrate Halloween.
  • Post #48 - October 15th, 2007, 3:05 pm
    Post #48 - October 15th, 2007, 3:05 pm Post #48 - October 15th, 2007, 3:05 pm
    Judy---Glad to see someone else from the 'hood (if MG is the "hood") come out of the shadows and get past their first post. I've driven past the Charcoal Oven literally hundreds of times, but have never worked up the nerve. Your use of the term "weirdness of the place" made me chuckle. I have never seen anyone going in or leaving, whcih I suppose adds to my reluctance to give it a whirl. But since I am a sucker for bleu cheese dressing, your recommendation may be the final push for myself and Mrs. Luvstoeat. Thanks!!!!
  • Post #49 - October 15th, 2007, 6:41 pm
    Post #49 - October 15th, 2007, 6:41 pm Post #49 - October 15th, 2007, 6:41 pm
    Oh! I'm so happy people replied to my reply/post!

    Mhays: Jim and I have also noticed the 'brownouts' and that sort of adds to the ambience of the place.....we're no strangers to brownouts, owning a 60-YO house in MG and also a place in N. Wisconsin, in the middle of the forest, where the slightest storm knocks out the electricity in nothing flat. The Charcoal Oven brownouts make us feel at home. There's probably some very strange electrical wiring going on in there. Jim and I are experienced in wiring (not electrical; telecommunications, but the concept is pretty much the same) and we enjoy looking around and trying to figure out what was done and when.

    LuvstoEat: I've gone past Charcoal Oven so many times in my life that I just can't count. I grew up in Skokie, around Howard and Crawford, and would take the bus to my job in Old Orchard, at O'Connor and Goldberg shoe store. The bus went down Golf and I always noticed that strange, squat, black building with the old fashioned sign. And, that was 35 years ago!! Jim and I didn't try it until about 3 years ago and we just fell in love with the oldness of the place.

    Jim and I also love UBAA in Skokie and Meier's Tavern on Lake St. in Wilmette.
  • Post #50 - October 15th, 2007, 7:13 pm
    Post #50 - October 15th, 2007, 7:13 pm Post #50 - October 15th, 2007, 7:13 pm
    Meier's----yet another place I've been past perhaps a zillion times and have never been in the front door. However, I can attest to UBAA!! Just the right place when you don't feel like getting gussied up and only a cheeseburger will fill the bill.
  • Post #51 - October 17th, 2007, 2:30 pm
    Post #51 - October 17th, 2007, 2:30 pm Post #51 - October 17th, 2007, 2:30 pm
    My partner and I were celebrating our anniversary with a couple of friends on Friday, and we decided to try out the Charcoal Oven. We had a fantastic meal, and we were there late enough to talk to the staff and owners.

    Phil has owned the place for 58 years - he bought it after returning from the war, when Evanston was still dry. Apparently they had a rockin bar business until about 1985 when Evanston repealed prohibition. But the food is still terrific, a good value, and everything on the menu is completely homemade.

    Mhays, Sonia is the name of the woman you call Frau Blucher. She's worked there steadily for 32 years, and she also makes the soups and some of the best salad dressings they offer (Danish Bleu, Creamy Garlic). She has a very funny, dry (Swedish) sense of humor too, if you engage her.

    Andrea (?) the daughter of the owner works the bar, and now manages the restaurant more often because Phil is getting up there in age.

    At our table, we had the rack of lamb (seasoned and cooked perfectly - amazing!), pork chop special (a very close second to the rack), the butt steak (one of their signature dishes) and the sirloin (I don't know why I didn't order the lamb).

    I love the supper club ambiance, the prices, the staff and the fact that they take great pride in their food and preparations. The place had several regulars that encouraged us to try certain dishes and return - how could you not love it? :!:
  • Post #52 - October 18th, 2007, 4:17 am
    Post #52 - October 18th, 2007, 4:17 am Post #52 - October 18th, 2007, 4:17 am
    I grew up almost literally across the street from CO- on Kenneth, just south o f Golf. My Dad still lives there. We ljoke about that place all the time- how can it still be open when you never see more than 3 cars there at a time? And those are usually 15 year old Cadillacs. We've been a few times over the years, as it is an easy walk from the house. As other posters have said its an old-timey place with decent food. If you accept what you are getting into it's not too bad.

    I laughed when I read some of the early posts (and no offense intended) as we also have maintained there must be a Sopranos connection!
  • Post #53 - October 18th, 2007, 7:57 pm
    Post #53 - October 18th, 2007, 7:57 pm Post #53 - October 18th, 2007, 7:57 pm
    Ultimately, and mostly due to Mhays' tale, I'm now officially scared of Charcoal Oven and those that occupy its realm of meaty darkness.

    Seriously, though, it sounds like a good place to have an LTH dinner outing sometime. I'd feel safer in a large group.

    (No - I'm not organizing one, but I might attend.)
    Did you know there is an LTHforum Flickr group? I just found it...
  • Post #54 - October 19th, 2007, 9:13 am
    Post #54 - October 19th, 2007, 9:13 am Post #54 - October 19th, 2007, 9:13 am
    I'd love to go back, especially with a group! I should also say that, although a very formal place in some ways, it seems like it would be a great place to take kids - at least, I wouldn't hesitate to take Sparky. It's one of those places where just the atmosphere should bring out the manners in your child, and I get the impression that they would be gentle with a little kid-related mayhem.

    Unfortunately, what with all the GNR dinners, our eating-out budget has been stretched pretty far this month, or I'd take you up on that suggestion, Mike...
  • Post #55 - October 19th, 2007, 10:44 am
    Post #55 - October 19th, 2007, 10:44 am Post #55 - October 19th, 2007, 10:44 am
    I haven't been in many years, but I might be convinced to organize a dinner sometime in mid-Nov, if there's interest.
  • Post #56 - November 11th, 2007, 6:45 am
    Post #56 - November 11th, 2007, 6:45 am Post #56 - November 11th, 2007, 6:45 am
    We had a really nice dinner at Charcoal Oven last night. In a nutshell, it's a low-key version of Sabatino's with a Greek spin, and that's a good thing.

    We arrived about quarter to five and were seated for our reservation immediately. My husband had warned them we'd have two kids with us, not problem. We were given the whole front alcove to spread out. Service was friendly, and relaxed. The owner and his daughter waited on us, (not the Frau. But we were advised she makes the delicious salad dressings.)
    Cocktails were generous and well mixed. I had a not too sweet, not too strong Old Fashioned.

    We did not get the nice lentil soup, but did each get a plate of pasticicio.

    How was the food. Simple, but perfectly prepared. I had the lamb chops - 4 3/4" cut lamb chops broiled to a perfect medium rare. My grandmother had the Athenian Chicken. I'm not sure what chicken has two thighs, two legs and one breast, but that's what you receive as an entree. My husband and grandfather had whitefish and walleye, both fish specials for the day. These were perfectly broiled with lemon and paprika. Very fresh, the walleye melted in your mouth.

    For desert I had the Triple Chocolate Bundt Cake. Nothing fancy, but definitely home made and very good. Others had the pudding, which was very good. And the pecan and apple pie, neither of which were great. Coffee was surprisingly good.

    Dinner for 4 adults with 2 rounds of drinks and dessert - $200 with tip. That included two bags of tomatoes. I'd gladly go back again. People have commented on the ambiance being weird, I found it to be classic. Where in the world do they put a single long taper on each table? Such a nice touch.

    Is is kid-friendly? I would say families are welcome. My kids were not fussed over, but they were accomadated. (With extra plates and extra space. I brought a milk box for my daughter, no big deal.) There's no changing table. They do have a high chair, we didn't use it. (we didn't need it) It's probably from 1980. They don't have a changing table. (Not a problem, you just have to plan accordingly) Dinner does not move quickly though, you have to go in knowing that. Everything is cooked to order, but the pace keeps moving. I think some kids would start to fade before dessert.
  • Post #57 - June 26th, 2008, 12:04 am
    Post #57 - June 26th, 2008, 12:04 am Post #57 - June 26th, 2008, 12:04 am
    Went back here last night. I won't comment on the food, except to say it was very, very good - the descriptions in previous posts, like these and this are still valid, at least based on the skate, lentil soup, salad, and fried potatoes are concerned. We got a small loaf of house-made sourdough bread instead of the usual tomatoes as a take-home gift.

    What's new is that the second generation is starting to assert itself a little. His daughter said that Phil Georgousses is only coming in on weekends now (at 85, after running the place for 60 years, can you blame him?) and, believe it or don't, they're actually planning on having a website. (I'll post the address once it's up.) And the famous 50th anniversary banner has been painted over. It finally reads "Happy 60th Anniversary, Phil." (The 50 was painted over to read 60 - the rest of the banner is the same.)

    But it remains a small, family-run, homey, retro-feeling place, relatively undiscovered, mostly supported by local regulars, and with a lot of history, going back to its speakeasy days (before Phil bought it). For me it's probably the best non-ethnic dining option in the Old Orchard area.

    I'd be interested in reading other reviews from LTHers. Especially if they order their meats and fish on the slightly rare side.
  • Post #58 - July 3rd, 2008, 10:19 pm
    Post #58 - July 3rd, 2008, 10:19 pm Post #58 - July 3rd, 2008, 10:19 pm
    I remember going to the Charcoal Oven on the advice of one of my friends back in '97. I haven't been there since as I moved from Lincolnwood to Oak Park shortly thereafter and don't have as much opportunity to get over that way. As I recall, we went on a weekday and there were few people in the place. It was very dark inside in contrast to the brightness outside. The food was fine-not inexpensive but not overly pricey, either. Our hostess/server ['Frau Blucher' in other posts] reminded me a little of Bette Davis' Jane Hudson character in 'What Ever Happened To Baby Jane?' I think I ordered fish but one of my friends had barbecued ribs. I distinctly remember her delivering the ribs with the exclamation 'Fresh Ribs!' (Not too fresh-I hope they slaughtered the pig first). As I recall, the place had the ambience of something out of a much earlier era.
    I'm getting together with the friend who suggested this place 11 years ago tomorrow for the 4th. Maybe I'll suggest that we revisit it again soon.
  • Post #59 - July 8th, 2008, 1:48 pm
    Post #59 - July 8th, 2008, 1:48 pm Post #59 - July 8th, 2008, 1:48 pm
    We dined at Charcoal Oven a couple of Saturdays ago. We arrived for an early dinner 6:30, and by 7:30 the restaurant was almost full. The food is fresh with a definite Greek influence.

    I ordered a bottle of wine off the small wine menu; it was okay but nothing special for the price. We both had a salad with Bleu cheese dresssing which had huge chunks of cheese and was maybe one of best version of this dressing I’ve ever had. Next was the pasticcio which was a nice touch. The wife had lamb chops, seasoned well but a little over-cooked she really like the dish though. The walleye I had was cooked simply and perfectly. We received the normal family-style side dishes of steamed asparagus (fresh and cooked perfect), hand made thick potato chips (very addicting) a little skimpy on the potatoes portion.

    The descriptions of brownouts, smallish booths, very tired decor, and "“Rolls already cooked in butter!” where spot on... LOL. Another thing that was weird was the handwritten menus did not match what they actually had to offer, a server came over and verbally gave us the specials.

    The one negative would be "Frau Blucher" she was a little to rude for me, though she seemed to be nice to the regulars.
  • Post #60 - August 19th, 2008, 1:00 am
    Post #60 - August 19th, 2008, 1:00 am Post #60 - August 19th, 2008, 1:00 am
    LTHForum,

    Charcoal Oven charmed, comfortable conversation friendly bar, newly redecorated dining room, pleasant sincere bartender, sweetly efficient hostess/waitress, who turned out to husband and wife, she, Maria, being the daughter of semi retired owner Phillip Georgouses, an overall feeling of care and attention to detail, albeit very low key.

    Image

    We, I had the pleasure of Renaissance Man Ronnie_Suburbans company, started with garlic brushed rolls and lentil soup, tender lentils highlighted with carrot and onion, followed by simple fresh salads with house made dressing including a powerful creamy garlic, and home grown cherry tomatoes.

    Menu included rack of lamb, double pork chops and a number of fresh fish specials, I opted for skate and Ron trout. Both served with steamed asparagus and terrific crisp greaseless cottage fries.

    Asparagus/Cottage Fries

    Image

    Skate was fresh as a dew on a leaf, lightly dusted with Greek seasoning laced panko, ditto for Trout.

    Skate

    Image

    Trout

    Image

    Apple pie with Homer's peach ice cream and Rice Pudding for dessert. Apple pie was tasty, but unevenly heated and 'Greek Style' (Maria said Greek style is creamer) topped with cinnamon not to my taste, but I am not a fan of rice pudding in general. I should note that a group of six guys came in specifically for Apple pie and Peach ice cream, they really love Charcoal Oven's Apple Pie.

    Apple Pie

    Image

    With the exception of the rolls and Homers peach ice cream we were served with our Apple Pie everything was made in-house, cherry tomatoes for salad and parting gift grown by Maria.

    Complimentary take home tomatoes

    Image

    Restaurant and bar were clean, comfortable, service excellent, food top notch, price reasonable and Maria and Rich could not have been nicer to a couple of newcomers. I'm looking forward to taking my wife to Charcoal Oven for dinner.

    Maria, Rich

    Image

    Two other Charcoal oven threads, one with pictures the other with info on the 60th Anniversary.

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    Charcoal Oven
    4400 Golf Road
    Skokie, IL
    847-675-8062
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow

Contact

About

Team

Advertize

Close

Chat

Articles

Guide

Events

more