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Chicago Foodways: Beef Packing Pioneers - Feb 2nd @ 10 AM

Chicago Foodways: Beef Packing Pioneers - Feb 2nd @ 10 AM
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  • Chicago Foodways: Beef Packing Pioneers - Feb 2nd @ 10 AM

    Post #1 - January 16th, 2008, 3:07 pm
    Post #1 - January 16th, 2008, 3:07 pm Post #1 - January 16th, 2008, 3:07 pm
    Chicago Foodways Roundtable

    George H. Hammond and Marcus M. Towle:
    Forgotten Pioneers of the Beef Packing Industry


    Presented by
    Richard Lytle

    Saturday, February 2nd, 2008
    10 AM
    Kendall College
    900 North Branch Street, Chicago
    (West of Halsted Street, North of Chicago Avenue)
    Free Parking

    Cost: $2 per person, free to Kendall students and faculty with ID.

    A few years ago, several Roundtable members attended the Hammond, Indiana Historical Society’s cemetery tour. At the grave of Marcus Towle, we learned he opened a slaughterhouse with his partner George Hammond in 1869. Hammond was credited with inventing the refrigerated rail car for conveying fresh meat and the refrigerated storage room. The entire presentation was a déjà vu moment because the story paralleled that of Gustavus Swift. While Swift made his initial foray into refrigerated rail cars in 1877, Hammond had conceived this idea in 1869. Swift expanded his business to Chicago in 1875 having commenced his cattle wholesale dealer business in 1872.

    Chicago was the center of the cattle trade in the United States. It was a railroad hub serving all regions of the country and was close to the Great Plains. Its South Side rail yards were the site of the famous Chicago Stockyards, where cattle were penned before shipment elsewhere. Hammond, Indiana just over the state line shared these same geographic and transportation qualities. Maybe this story would be better known today if a fire hadn’t destroyed the Hammond Packing House leaving 1,800 workers unemployed in 1901.

    If it were not for a flip of a coin, Hammond, Indiana may well have been named Hohman. Historian Richard Lytle of the Hammond Public Library and Hammond Historical Society will reveal history of these forgotten pioneers: George H. Hammond and Marcus M. Towle. These two pioneers preceded both Armour and Swift in refrigerated storage and rail transportation.

    This program is hosted by the Chicago Foodways Roundtable. To reserve, please PM Cathy2 then leave your name and how many people in your party or e-mail: chicago.foodways.roundtable@gmail.com
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #2 - January 29th, 2008, 12:32 am
    Post #2 - January 29th, 2008, 12:32 am Post #2 - January 29th, 2008, 12:32 am
    Hi,

    Originally this talk was going to be presented in a classroom. However they have moved us to the Woodmode auditorium. Bonus: I froze the leftover Cowboy Stew aka Son-of-a-Bitch stew from the picnic. For those who are SOB curious, then this may be the last chance to give it a shot.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #3 - January 29th, 2008, 12:49 am
    Post #3 - January 29th, 2008, 12:49 am Post #3 - January 29th, 2008, 12:49 am
    PLEASE save me a portion of the SOB stew!
  • Post #4 - January 31st, 2008, 10:24 pm
    Post #4 - January 31st, 2008, 10:24 pm Post #4 - January 31st, 2008, 10:24 pm
    This promises to be an interesting talk on an important aspect of food history that is often incorrectly recounted.

    Cathy2 wrote:At the grave of Marcus Towle, we learned he opened a slaughterhouse with his partner George Hammond in 1869.

    Image

    Cathy2 wrote:Hammond was credited with inventing the refrigerated rail car for conveying fresh meat and the refrigerated storage room.

    Image

    At the cemetery tour our guide explained (with a straight face) that in addition to those achievements Hammond was the first to demonstrate the edibility of tripe. I hope to get to the bottom of this story at Saturday's talk.
  • Post #5 - February 22nd, 2008, 2:44 pm
    Post #5 - February 22nd, 2008, 2:44 pm Post #5 - February 22nd, 2008, 2:44 pm
    Hi,

    Courtesy of WBEZ's Chicago Amplified program, there is a podcast available on George H. Hammond and Marcus M. Towle: Forgotten Pioneers of the Beef Packing Industry.

    I'm pleased the announcement of this program brought a Hammond ancestor to the attention of the Hammond Historical Society.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast

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