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  • Post #61 - March 3rd, 2008, 5:10 am
    Post #61 - March 3rd, 2008, 5:10 am Post #61 - March 3rd, 2008, 5:10 am
    It's the journey...

    In a desultory sort of way, Himself and I collect china. So on a trip to the Netherlands some years ago, we resolved to look out for Dutch pottery. Although the blue-and-white Delftware is probably the best-known, every part of the Netherlands has its unique style of pottery, and our search led us to tiny towns, minuscule museums and other fascinating places most tourists don't visit -- even a toilet factory in Maastricht, which housed, in the basement of its showroom of gleaming bathroom fixtures, a little display of antique pottery made by its founder, Petrus Regout (including chamber pots, of course).

    What does this have to do with food, or music? Nothing except that the trip taught me that a quest can lead you into all sorts of interesting byways.

    So it is with food songs. It's a quirky approach to music appreciation, I know, but the search for food-related music has led me to artists I'd never have discovered otherwise, particularly international bands (such as Black Debbath, above, the Japanese pop group Shonen Knife and the British ska band 7 Seconds of Love). Even when it turns out that a song that at first glance seems to be about food is really an instrumental or about something else altogether, I often discover worthwhile music. (Of course, it helps that my tastes in music are nearly as eclectic as my tastes in food.)

    While I guess no one else here quite shares my particular obsession with this manifestation of food in culture, I hope you are listening to and enjoying the songs.

    Here's Tab Benoit covering Too Many Dirty Dishes (video)
    Albert Collins wrote:Too many dirty dishes in the sink for just us two
    I said, too many dirty dishes in the sink for just us two
    You got me wonderin' baby
    Who's makin' dirty dishes with you?
  • Post #62 - March 6th, 2008, 12:28 am
    Post #62 - March 6th, 2008, 12:28 am Post #62 - March 6th, 2008, 12:28 am
    How about a little love for our own Dick Baker? A singer and piano player, he spent nearly his entire career in Chicago. Among other gigs, he had a syndicated musical variety show on WGN radio in the 1940s, a popular children's show (The Happy Pirates) on WBKB-TV in the 1950s, and performed at nightclubs such as the Ivanhoe and Mangam's Chateau in the 1960s and 70s. Two Ton Baker, The Music Maker weighed about 350 pounds and recorded several songs about food, clearly a topic dear to him.

    Let's start with one of his better known songs, I Like Stinky Cheese.

    Next up, his children's "classic," I'm a Little Weenie. They sure don't make 'em like that anymore.

    Still with us? Try A Chocolate Sundae on a Saturday Night.

    If you made it this far you might as well finish with The Soup Song and Eachy Peachy Pie.

    There's an excellent website devoted to Two Ton Baker where you can find many more songs, biographical information and lots more.
  • Post #63 - March 6th, 2008, 12:47 am
    Post #63 - March 6th, 2008, 12:47 am Post #63 - March 6th, 2008, 12:47 am
    Rene G wrote:Two Ton Baker, The Music Maker weighed about 350 pounds and recorded several songs about food, clearly a topic dear to him.


    I remember Two Ton best as they guy who indelibly impressed upon the minds of young people the coordinates for Riverview, the most wonderful place in 50's Chicago...Western and Belmont! I never drive past that intersection without remembering Two Ton (dressed as a clown, I seem to recall) shouting that out.

    Image
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #64 - March 6th, 2008, 2:07 am
    Post #64 - March 6th, 2008, 2:07 am Post #64 - March 6th, 2008, 2:07 am
    David Hammond wrote:I remember Two Ton best as they guy who indelibly impressed upon the minds of young people the coordinates for Riverview, the most wonderful place in 50's Chicago...Western and Belmont! I never drive past that intersection without remembering Two Ton (dressed as a clown, I seem to recall) shouting that out.

    On http://twotonbaker.com, Dick Baker (no relation) wrote:Two Ton also was in demand as a commercial pitch man. Perhaps most memorable was his long tenure as spokesman for the Riverview Amusement Park, which featured him singing a ditty he made up for the commercial and whirling into view jammed into a roller coaster car, singing “Laugh your troubles away!”

    Two Ton Baker was also responsible for another 1950s classic you might remember, Bert the Turtle (The Duck and Cover Song).
  • Post #65 - March 6th, 2008, 7:12 am
    Post #65 - March 6th, 2008, 7:12 am Post #65 - March 6th, 2008, 7:12 am
    Rene G wrote:Two Ton Baker was also responsible for another 1950s classic you might remember, Bert the Turtle (The Duck and Cover Song).


    Related to classic 50's educational films, I grew up in Elmhurst with the original Mr. Bungles (his name was Glenn Pape, and I still talk to him now and again; he lives in Oregon but he was selected to be the brunette badboy in a movie that featured a number of blonde, blue-eyed good kids).

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2s7X5-Drctk

    Fun fact: Phil, the goodest of the good kids in the film, eventually ended up a hopeless acid freak and walked into a fast moving train. "He always enjoyed looking at the good food in the cafeteria. It tasted good and was good for him, too."
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #66 - March 6th, 2008, 7:21 pm
    Post #66 - March 6th, 2008, 7:21 pm Post #66 - March 6th, 2008, 7:21 pm
    Rene G wrote:How about a little love for our own Dick Baker? A singer and piano player, he spent nearly his entire career in Chicago. Among other gigs, he had a syndicated musical variety show on WGN radio in the 1940s, a popular children's show (The Happy Pirates) on WBKB-TV in the 1950s

    Baker didn't only do children's songs. He apparently recorded the original version of the No Beer in Heaven polka, in English, anyway, before such polka legends as Frankie "Who Stole the Keeshka?" Yankovic and Chicago's "Li'l Wally" Jagiello made hits with it. (Jagiello, "The Polka King," is perhaps best known outside polka circles as one of the composers of "Let's Go Go Go White Sox," recorded with Captain Stubby and the Buccaneers, which had a resurgence in 2005. I've been searching for his recordings of "I Like Her Golabka" and "She Likes Kielbasa.")

    Image
  • Post #67 - March 6th, 2008, 7:54 pm
    Post #67 - March 6th, 2008, 7:54 pm Post #67 - March 6th, 2008, 7:54 pm
    Tom Waits. He’s not for everyone, no doubt about it, but if we’re talking food—which we appear to be, he’s a rich source of lyrics. Indeed, his lyrics are extraordinary regardless of subject, but the brief mention of him upthread barely scratches the surface. Now, they’re not all great songs but even his titles are, shall we say, ummm, picturesque. There’s “Starvin’ in the Belly of A Whale” and “Gin Soaked Boy” or “Jockey Full of Bourbon” and the wonderful “The Piano Has Been Drinking.” I’ll jump past those, though, to get to three great “food pieces”: “Ice Cream Man,” the extraordinary “Chocolate Jesus,” and the wonderfully evocative “Ghosts Of Saturday Night (After Hours At Napoleone's Pizza House).” Herewith some excerpts:

    Ice Cream Man
    “I'll be clickin' by your house about two forty-five
    Sidewalk sundae strawberry surprise,
    I got a cherry popsicle right on time
    A big stick, mamma, that'll blow your mind

    'Cause I'm the ice cream man, I'm a one-man band (yeah)
    I'm the ice cream man, honey, I'll be good to you.

    Baby, missed me in the alley, baby, don't you fret
    Come back around and don't forget,
    When you're tired and you're hungry and you want something cool,
    Got something better than a swimming pool

    'Cause I'm the ice cream man, I'm a one-man band
    I'm the ice cream man, honey, I'll be good to you...”


    from Chocolate Jesus
    “Don't go to church on Sunday
    Don't get on my knees to pray
    Don't memorize the books of the Bible
    I got my own special way
    But I know Jesus loves me
    Maybe just a little bit more

    I fall on my knees every Sunday
    At Zerelda Lee's candy store

    Well it's got to be a chocolate Jesus
    Make me feel good inside
    Got to be a chocolate Jesus
    Keep me satisfied

    Well I don't want no Anna Zabba
    Don't want no Almond Joy
    There ain't nothing better
    Suitable for this boy
    Well it's the only thing
    That can pick me up
    Better than a cup of gold
    See only a chocolate Jesus
    Can satisfy my soul.”

    And, finally, from Ghosts Of Saturday Night (After Hours At Napoleone's Pizza House)
    “...As he dreams of a waitress with Maxwell House eyes
    And marmalade thighs with scrambled yellow hair.

    Her rhinestone-studded moniker says, "Irene"
    As she wipes the wisps of dishwater blonde from her eyes
    And the Texaco beacon burns on,
    The steel-belted attendant with a 'Ring and Valve Special'...
    Cryin' "Fill'er up and check that oil"
    "You know it could be a distributor and it could be a coil."

    The early mornin' final edition's on the stands,
    And that town crier's cryin' there with nickels in his hands.
    Pigs in a blanket sixty-nine cents,
    Eggs - roll 'em over and a package of Kents,
    Adam and Eve on a log, you can sink 'em damn straight,
    Hash browns, hash browns, you know I can't be late.”


    I do believe I should rest my case.
    Gypsy Boy

    "I am not a glutton--I am an explorer of food." (Erma Bombeck)
  • Post #68 - March 7th, 2008, 9:46 pm
    Post #68 - March 7th, 2008, 9:46 pm Post #68 - March 7th, 2008, 9:46 pm
    Gypsy Boy wrote:Tom Waits. He’s not for everyone, no doubt about it, but if we’re talking food—which we appear to be, he’s a rich source of lyrics.

    Waits is hit or miss for me. Often remarkable lyrics, but his musical style is all over the map. I enjoy his rough-voiced, Dylanesque folky style, as well as his bluesier and jazzier moments, but sometimes, as with "Jockey Full of Bourbon," his sound is just too weird.

    Weird though it is, one Waits number that definitely deserves mentioning here is the extraordinary "Filipino Box Spring Hog."



    Cookin' up a Filipino box spring hog
    Dig a big pit in a dirt alley road
    Fill it with madrone and bay
    Stinks like hell
    And the neighbors complain
    Don't give a hoot what they say
    Slap that hog
    Gotta roll em over twice
    Baste him with a sweeping broom
    You gotta swat them flies
    And chain up the dogs
    Cookin' up a Filipino box spring hog

    Play it the next time you drive through Wheeling. And Stand By Your Ham.

    Edit to replace broken link.
    Last edited by LAZ on March 19th, 2010, 11:29 am, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #69 - March 19th, 2008, 5:15 am
    Post #69 - March 19th, 2008, 5:15 am Post #69 - March 19th, 2008, 5:15 am
    Musical views of genetically modified food

    Meatberry Pie (mp3) from Garden Variety by the Green Beings wrote:We don't want meatberry pie or hogapple sauce
    Or cucumbers crossed with snails
    Don't give us veggie-veal, or fishy-corn meal,
    Or grapes with blubber from whales!
    If you offer me oats with genes from goats
    Then I will just say 'see ya!'
    Although you might not die
    From a meatberry pie
    It's a berry bad idea!

    "The Green Beings are a food-rock band, performing original music for a healthy, culinarily responsible audience."


    It Still Seems Like Food to Me (flash) from Still Stayin' Alive by Carl Winter wrote:What's the matter with the food I'm eating
    Are you worried that it's modified?
    Maybe I should buy my food organic
    Till these high-tech fears subside
    Inside I tell ya that I'm not so worried, honey
    Even if Monsanto's makin' lots of money
    Roundup-ready soy beans,
    BST and fish genes
    It still seems like food to me

    "By day, Carl Winter is director of the FoodSafe program and extension food toxicologist in the Department of Food Science and Technology at the University of California at Davis. The rest of the time, he's a singer of science."
  • Post #70 - April 19th, 2008, 6:18 am
    Post #70 - April 19th, 2008, 6:18 am Post #70 - April 19th, 2008, 6:18 am
    Pied pipers of Passover

    Something for every musical taste, if unfairly hard on the fare....

    Pop
    Manischewitzville by Billy Ray Sheet wrote:Passover time again in Manischewitzville
    Searchin' for my last crumb of chometz
    Time to buy chrain
    And pour the beer down the drain
    Blues
    Passover Blues by Jeff Weiner and Bob Cramer wrote:We got matzo and haroses, got chopped liver
    And grandma's chicken soup
    Yeah, we got the the bitter herbs to remind us
    of our large sufferin', baby
    Hey, I like that liver, grandma,
    How 'bout one more scoop?
    Shoulda done like I did last Passover
    And got a burger on the ride over
    Hip hop
    Matzah! by Eric 'Smooth-E' Schwartz wrote:But I gotta question
    About the bread that is unleavened
    Causin' indigestion
    Matzah!
    Eat it for week we gots ta
    Disco
    Matzo Man by American Comedy Network wrote:Serve it for the seder -- it's a feast
    Doesn't have much flavor, and no yeast
    Matzo balls are heavy, so better eat 'em slow
    And they're sort of binding -- won't let my people go
    Folk
    20 Things to Do with Matzah by Michelle Citrin and William Levin wrote:1. Catch it like a Frisbee with your friends in the park, or you could
    2. jump in the water and pretend you're a shark
    3. You can make a matzah pick and play the guitar, and you can
    4. make a matzah license plate for your car
    Rock
    I Love the Jewish People I Just Hate Their Food by 'Stuttering John' Melendez wrote:I love the Jewish people I just hate their food
    Matzo balls look like the bread's been already chewed

    Gut Pesach!
  • Post #71 - April 19th, 2008, 4:15 pm
    Post #71 - April 19th, 2008, 4:15 pm Post #71 - April 19th, 2008, 4:15 pm
    I think that New Orleans singer and songwriter Paul Sanchez is one of the most underappreciated lyricists in regional pop music. He performs this regularly with his band Cowboy Mouth:

    Hurricane Party

    We had a little party me and my friends
    A hurricane was coming to New Orleans again
    somebody brought scotch somebody brought beer
    I shoulda' kept the hooch and thrown'em outta here

    A friendly game a penny a hand
    Smoke a cigar act like a man
    Waintin' for the gale force winds to blow
    Shuffle up the cards and let the liquor flow

    My hurricane party got outta control
    I'm lying in the gutter eatin' tootsie rolls
    With red ant bites all over my ass
    Beating on my buddies with a baseball bat

    Somebody's girlfriend showed up by surprise
    With cookies in her hands and dollar signs in her eyes
    I started dipping her cookies in scotch
    Well she won all my money and my pocket watch

    Well I passed out and I woke up
    The house was empty and so was my cup
    From out on the front porch I heard them shout
    I wish they'd come in so I could throw them out

    My hurricane party got outta control
    I'm lying in the gutter eatin' tootsie rolls
    With red ant bites all over my ass
    Beating on my buddies with a baseball bat

    Everybody's wrestling out in the dirt
    I laughed so hard till my stomach hurt
    They saw me clean they heard me laugh
    They started charging at me and I grabbed the bat

    My hurricane party got outta control
    I'm lying in the gutter eatin' tootsie rolls
    With red ant bites all over my ass
    Beating on my buddies with a baseball bat
    Beating on my buddies with a baseball bat
    Beating on my buddies with a baseball bat
    I used to know the way to Fenway Park!

    FYI...Cowboy Mouth will be playing the Sheffield Garden Walk on July 20 at 8 pm.
    Last edited by YourPalWill on April 19th, 2008, 11:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #72 - April 19th, 2008, 4:47 pm
    Post #72 - April 19th, 2008, 4:47 pm Post #72 - April 19th, 2008, 4:47 pm
    YourPalWill wrote:I think that New Orleans singer and songwriter Paul Sanchez is one of the most underappreciated lyricists in regional pop music. He performs this regularly with his band Cowboy Mouth:

    Hurricane Party

    Thanks, Will.

    Cowboy Mouth performing "Hurricane Party" in Chicago (video)
  • Post #73 - April 22nd, 2008, 8:14 pm
    Post #73 - April 22nd, 2008, 8:14 pm Post #73 - April 22nd, 2008, 8:14 pm
    Is it possible that no-one has included this number by the immortal Steve Goodman??

    Chicken Cordon Bleus

    When I first met you baby, you fed me on chicken and wine.
    It was steak and potatoes and lobster and babe I sure felt fine.
    But now all you ever give me is the seaweed and the alfalfa sprouts
    And sunflower seeds and I got my doubts -
    Babe, you left me here with the Chicken Cordon Bleus.

    My stomach is empty and all I got is food for thought.
    And I been sittin' here thinkin' 'bout the twenty lbs. of groceries we bought . . .
    We bought ten lbs. of brown rice and five more of beans
    And five pounds of Granola and you know what that means,
    I'm just a regular fella with the Chicken Cordon Bleus.

    Now won't you play me them fat licks!

    You know, I'm starved for affection and babe, I can't take no more.
    You know this stuff is so weird that the cockroaches moved next door.
    Babe, can you see that old dog, he's out in the street
    He's got a big smile on his face 'cause they let him meat.
    And babe I got the lemon and the Chicken Cordon Bleus!

    [spoken over guitar vamp . . . ]
    Babe, I'm goin down to the bakery
    And I'm going to find me a jelly roll
    And some cannoli.
    Some French pastry.
    A chocolate éclair don't sound too bad.
    How about some lasagna ?
    You know fat is where it's at.
    My shadow disappears ...


    Giovanna
    =o=o=o=o=o=o=o=o=o=o=o=

    "Enjoy every sandwich."

    -Warren Zevon
  • Post #74 - April 22nd, 2008, 8:38 pm
    Post #74 - April 22nd, 2008, 8:38 pm Post #74 - April 22nd, 2008, 8:38 pm
    Gypsy Boy wrote:Tom Waits. He’s not for everyone, no doubt about it, but if we’re talking food—which we appear to be, he’s a rich source of lyrics. Indeed, his lyrics are extraordinary regardless of subject, but the brief mention of him upthread barely scratches the surface. Now, they’re not all great songs but even his titles are, shall we say, ummm, picturesque. There’s “Starvin’ in the Belly of A Whale” and “Gin Soaked Boy” or “Jockey Full of Bourbon” and the wonderful “The Piano Has Been Drinking.” I’ll jump past those, though, to get to three great “food pieces”: “Ice Cream Man,” the extraordinary “Chocolate Jesus,” and the wonderfully evocative “Ghosts Of Saturday Night (After Hours At Napoleone's Pizza House).” Herewith some excerpts:

    Ice Cream Man
    “I'll be clickin' by your house about two forty-five
    Sidewalk sundae strawberry surprise,
    I got a cherry popsicle right on time
    A big stick, mamma, that'll blow your mind

    'Cause I'm the ice cream man, I'm a one-man band (yeah)
    I'm the ice cream man, honey, I'll be good to you.

    Baby, missed me in the alley, baby, don't you fret
    Come back around and don't forget,
    When you're tired and you're hungry and you want something cool,
    Got something better than a swimming pool

    'Cause I'm the ice cream man, I'm a one-man band
    I'm the ice cream man, honey, I'll be good to you...”


    from Chocolate Jesus
    “Don't go to church on Sunday
    Don't get on my knees to pray
    Don't memorize the books of the Bible
    I got my own special way
    But I know Jesus loves me
    Maybe just a little bit more

    I fall on my knees every Sunday
    At Zerelda Lee's candy store

    Well it's got to be a chocolate Jesus
    Make me feel good inside
    Got to be a chocolate Jesus
    Keep me satisfied

    Well I don't want no Anna Zabba
    Don't want no Almond Joy
    There ain't nothing better
    Suitable for this boy
    Well it's the only thing
    That can pick me up
    Better than a cup of gold
    See only a chocolate Jesus
    Can satisfy my soul.”

    And, finally, from Ghosts Of Saturday Night (After Hours At Napoleone's Pizza House)
    “...As he dreams of a waitress with Maxwell House eyes
    And marmalade thighs with scrambled yellow hair.

    Her rhinestone-studded moniker says, "Irene"
    As she wipes the wisps of dishwater blonde from her eyes
    And the Texaco beacon burns on,
    The steel-belted attendant with a 'Ring and Valve Special'...
    Cryin' "Fill'er up and check that oil"
    "You know it could be a distributor and it could be a coil."

    The early mornin' final edition's on the stands,
    And that town crier's cryin' there with nickels in his hands.
    Pigs in a blanket sixty-nine cents,
    Eggs - roll 'em over and a package of Kents,
    Adam and Eve on a log, you can sink 'em damn straight,
    Hash browns, hash browns, you know I can't be late.”


    I do believe I should rest my case.


    Haven't heard the Tom Waits version, but I wonder if its's influenced by the original by John Brim written back in the 50's?

    And it goes something like this:

    Ice Cream Man

    Written by:
    John Brim.
    © Arc Music Corp. BMI.
    All Rights Reserved.
    ---
    (Dedicate one to the ladies...)
    Now summertime's here babe, need somethin' to keep you cool
    Ah now summertime's here babe, need somethin' to keep you cool
    Better look out now though, Dave's got somethin' for you
    Tell ya what it is
    I'm your ice cream man, stop me when I'm passin' by
    Oh my my, I'm your ice cream man, stop me when I'm passin' by
    See now all my flavors are guaranteed to satisfy
    Hold on a second baby
    I got good lemonade, ah, dixie cups
    All flavors and push ups too
    I'm your ice cream man, baby, stop me when I'm passin' by
    See now all my flavors are guaranteed to satisfy
    Hold on, one more
    Well, I'm usually passin' by just about eleven o'clock
    Uh huh, I never stop, I'm usually passin' by, just around eleven o'clock
    And if you let me cool you one time, you'll be my regular stop
    All right boys
    I got good lemonade, ah, dixie cups
    All flavors and push ups too
    I'm your ice cream man, stop me when I'm passin' by
    See now all my flavors are guaranteed to satisfy
    Yes I'm your ice cream man, stop me when I'm passin' by
    I'm your ice cream man, stop me when I'm passin' by
    They say all my flavors are guaranteed to satisfy
    Ah, one time
    I'm your ice cream man, stop me when I'm passin' by
    I'm your ice cream man, stop me when I'm passin' by
    They say all my flavors are guaranteed to satisfy
    One time, boys
    I'm your ice cream man
    I'm your ice cream man
    B-b-b-b-b-b-b-baby
    Ah my, my, my
    All my flavors are guaranteed to satis-uh-fy
    Ow



    Mr Brim was a fine gentleman, a blues legend, and I did have the pleasure of hosting him at my home a time or two back in the 80's.
    I can't believe I ate the whole thing!
  • Post #75 - April 22nd, 2008, 9:55 pm
    Post #75 - April 22nd, 2008, 9:55 pm Post #75 - April 22nd, 2008, 9:55 pm
    vacation place? Wisconsin
    favorite sausage? Johnson's
    favorite chicken? swanson's

    It is a Chicago based site and since there are some food shout outs I thought some would like this video. Very Chicago and very entertaining.

    http://youtube.com/watch?v=oqrtoFWglMY

    anyone ever taken the other to Bennigan's to see how the steaks are?
  • Post #76 - April 22nd, 2008, 10:07 pm
    Post #76 - April 22nd, 2008, 10:07 pm Post #76 - April 22nd, 2008, 10:07 pm
    Gypsy Boy wrote:Tom Waits.... Ice Cream Man

    Liz in Norwood Park wrote:Haven't heard the Tom Waits version, but I wonder if its's influenced by the original by John Brim written back in the 50's?

    Supposedly not. Not that Wikipedia is a definitive source, but they and others claim Waits' version is wholly original.

    Anyway, the sound is quite different:

    Tom Waits' Ice Cream Man

    John Brim's Ice Cream Man

    The Brim version is the one covered by Van Halen.

    Giovanna wrote:Is it possible that no-one has included this number by the immortal Steve Goodman??

    Ah, I knew somebody would mention "Chicken Cordon Blues" eventually. What a talent Goodman was! Although my personal favorite remains Lincoln Park Pirates.
  • Post #77 - April 27th, 2008, 7:09 pm
    Post #77 - April 27th, 2008, 7:09 pm Post #77 - April 27th, 2008, 7:09 pm
    Image

    Old-time tamale tunes

    The various tamale threads have had me hummin' some old-time tamale tunes.

    Musical evidence shows that the tradition of roving tamale salesmen dates back at least to the early 20th century and and hints that they were common in Chicago. The songs make it pretty clear that those sellers were African Americans, unlike most of today's tamaleros, who are largely Mexican immigrants. It's hard to say what kind of tamales they sold, but I'd guess it would be the traditional Chicago corn roll or Mississipi Delta style.

    In 1909, Chicago composer Herbert Ingraham published "The Hot Tamale Man."
    Hot tamale wrapped in corn so neat,
    Hot tamale made of chicken meat,
    Hot tamale makes you feel so jolly and gay,
    That's why I say:
    Buy a hot ta-mot out of a steamin' pot
    While they are nice and hot
    You'll get the best I got

    Singer Pearl A. Hunt's picture graces the cover of the sheet music, but I can't find evidence that she recorded the song. However, the much better known Arthur Collins, a popular vaudeville minstrel and radio artist of the period, recorded "The Hot Tamale Man" for both Victor and Columbia in 1909. (Although the song's lyrics are innocuous, Collins' performance unfortunately features an interlude of the appalling ethnic jibes rife in the popular entertainment of that era. The ubiquitous "coon" acts are best remembered today, but just about everyone came in for crude burlesques, including Jews, Germans, Italians, Asians, the Irish and even "The Argentines, the Portuguese and the Greeks.")

    Chicago composers Fred Rose and Charlie Harrison added to the musical praise of itinerant tamale men with the lively "Here Comes the Hot Tamale Man" in 1926, a Charleston-dance tune that became a standard of the period's Chicago/New Orleans jazz. (Rose would later move on to Nashville and country-music fame, but he and Harrison also collaborated on "I'll Meet You in Chicago (at the Fair)," in 1928, presumably to promote the 1933 Century of Progress World's Fair.)

    "Here Comes the Hot Tamale Man" was first recorded in 1926 by Charles L. "Doc Cook" Cooke. Cooke, a Ph.D. keyboardist, composer and conductor who had studied at the Chicago College of Music under composer Louis Victor Saar and Chicago Symphony Orchestra program annotator Felix Borowski, presided over Cook and his Dreamland Orchestra, house musicians of Paddy Harmon's Dreamland Ballroom at Paulina and Van Buren in Chicago.

    The Dreamland version has the best sound, but Cooke also recorded the song in 1926 with his smaller band, Cookie's Gingersnaps. Both recordings feature the legendary Freddie Keppard on cornet.

    Except for a few shouted interjections ("I've got red hot! Red hot, that's what!") both versions are instrumental. It's unclear when lyrics were introduced to the song, but on their 2001 release, the New Leviathan Oriental Fox-Trot Orchestra, a New Orleans jazz revivalist group, performs "Here Comes the Hot Tamale Man" with these words:
    Just see that bucket steamin'
    And hear those folks all screamin'
    "Here comes the Hot Tamale Man!"
    He comes down Main Street yellin'
    "Here comes the Hot Tamale Man!"
    Watch him Charleston down the line
    Shoutin' "I got red hot!"
    Everybody fall in line for "Red hot! That's what!"
    Come on folks, get out your money,
    He needs shoesies for his honey,
    Here comes the Hot Tamale Man!

    You can contrast the uptempo song's sophisticated, urban sound with the earthy, early blues of "Molly Man" by Red Hot Ole Mose (a secular stage name for the Rev. Moses Mason, best known as a gospel singer). Though recorded in Chicago in 1928, "Molly Man," with its references to cotton fields, is clearly set in the rural South:
    Molly man's coming, I hear his voice
    He's got hot tamales, and it's just my choice
    Come on boys, and don't wait too long
    All my 'males soon will be gone
    I can judge by the way you act
    Somebody around here had on a cotton-picking track
    Feeling tired, shoulder's getting sore
    If you see 'male, you're going to take some more
    Two for a nickel, four for a dime
    Thirty cents a dozen, and you'll sure eat fine
    Good times have come in, don't you see the signs
    Cotton bolls are open, you can make a-many dimes
    I can judge by the way you walk
    You going to carry half a dozen off
    If my holler, boys, trouble your mind
    You had to come running with a dime
    Good times have come in, don't you see the signs
    White folks standing around here spending a-many dimes
    'Males so hot it burns my hand
    Says I can't hardly get them out of my can

    Famed bluesman Robert Johnson, originator of "Sweet Home Chicago," also sang about a tamale seller, although his 1936 composition, "They're Red Hot," describes a hot tamale woman.
    Hot tamales and they're red hot, yes she got 'em for sale
    She got two for a nickel, got four for a dime
    Would sell you more, but they ain't none of mine
    Hot tamales and they're red hot, yes she got 'em for sale, I mean
    Yes, she got 'em for sale, yes, yeah
    Hot tamales and they're red hot

    Give these red-hot tunes a listen.

    Arthur Collins-The Hot Tamale Man, 1909 (Warning: Offensive language.)

    Doc Cook and his Dreamland Orchestra-Here Comes the Hot Tamale Man, 1926

    Cookie's Gingersnaps-Here Comes the Hot Tamale Man, 1926

    New Leviathan Oriental Fox-Trot Orchestra-Here Comes the Hot Tamale Man, 2001

    Red Hot Ole Mose-Molly Man, 1928


    Robert Johnson-They're Red Hot, 1936
    Last edited by LAZ on February 19th, 2009, 9:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #78 - May 9th, 2008, 8:52 am
    Post #78 - May 9th, 2008, 8:52 am Post #78 - May 9th, 2008, 8:52 am
    Music for a toast restaurant:

    Heywood Banks-Toast.
    Streetband-Toast.
  • Post #79 - May 13th, 2008, 2:11 am
    Post #79 - May 13th, 2008, 2:11 am Post #79 - May 13th, 2008, 2:11 am
    The Capitol Steps are the country's foremost musical political-comedy troupe.

    The Capitol Steps wrote:CHINA is secretly pleased by protests during the Olympic torch relay and controversy over Tibet, since they divert attention from the big business of exporting dangerous products. Already China leads in providing tainted pet food, hazardous toothpaste, and poisonous toys. Last week, we learned that contaminated heparin, a blood thinner, is suspected in dozens of deaths in 11 countries.

    The Capitol Steps: Buy, Buy, American Pie (mp3)
  • Post #80 - May 16th, 2008, 4:09 am
    Post #80 - May 16th, 2008, 4:09 am Post #80 - May 16th, 2008, 4:09 am
    Not food music, per se, but a video blog about musicians and their food interests:

    Cooking with Rockstars
  • Post #81 - June 1st, 2008, 11:40 pm
    Post #81 - June 1st, 2008, 11:40 pm Post #81 - June 1st, 2008, 11:40 pm
    Two music videos about kimchi:

    Kimchi Kkakdugi, from North Korea

    A Song for Kimchi, children's song

    If anyone can translate or identify the artists, please do.
  • Post #82 - June 18th, 2008, 9:43 am
    Post #82 - June 18th, 2008, 9:43 am Post #82 - June 18th, 2008, 9:43 am
    Well, it's not exactly food music, or not entirely, but it's awfully funny:

    Dishes Like to be Dirty by Olde English (video)
  • Post #83 - June 19th, 2008, 4:02 pm
    Post #83 - June 19th, 2008, 4:02 pm Post #83 - June 19th, 2008, 4:02 pm
    I'm surprised that the band Cibo Matto hasn't emerged on this thread. Their first CD is full of food-related song titles: Apple, Beef Jerky, Sugar Water, White Pepper Ice Cream, Birthday Cake, Know Your Chicken, The Candy Man, Le Pain Perdu, and Artichoke. And the music is as tasty is the titles!
  • Post #84 - June 26th, 2008, 3:14 am
    Post #84 - June 26th, 2008, 3:14 am Post #84 - June 26th, 2008, 3:14 am
    Here is the menu-related portion of the playlist from the LTHForum 1,000-Recipe Potluck.

    Leftover Salmon - Hot Corn, Cold Corn 1997
    Joyce Poynter - Chilli Dippin' Baby 1957
    Monster Crossing - Extra Garlic 2004
    Trachtenburg Family Slideshow Players - Eggs 2001
    I Love Egg - Egg Song
    Fats Waller - Hold Tight (I Want Some Seafood Mama) 1939
    Guys on Ice (The Ice Fishing Musical) - Fish is the Miracle Food 1999
    GiR2007 (James Provan) - Fishcakes! 2007
    Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles - Pizza Power 1990
    Nancy Eaton - One Meatball 2006
    Roughly Enforcing Nostalgia - Mexican Food 2000
    Sherman "Blues" Johnson & his Clouds of Joy - Hot Fish 1952
    Fats Waller - Hold Tight (I Want Some Seafood Mama) 1939
    Savannah Churchill and her All Star Seven - Fat Meat is Good Meat 1942
    Gillo - The Proper Pork Song ca. 2005
    Andre Williams and the Natural Bridge Bunch - Pig Snoots-Part 1 1968
    National Pork Board - Pork. The Other White Meat 1987
    National Pig Association (of Great Britain) - Stand By Your Ham 2008
    Norman Greenbaum - Canned Ham 1970
    FlowGo - Meatloaf Dance ca. 2008
    Dizzy Gillespie - Hey Pete! Let's Eat More Meat 1946
    Mickey Katz - Sixteen Tons 1950s
    Jerry Lee Lewis - Meat Man 1973
    Cibo Matto - Know Your Chicken 1996
    Eve Boswell - Pickin' a Chicken 1956
    Cab Calloway - A Chicken Ain't Nothin' But a Bird 1940
    Yamaha Music Foundation - The Salad Song 1992
    Dole 5 A Day Friends - Salad Sisters 2004
    Harry Champion - A Little Bit of Cucumber 1917
    The Evelyn Situation - Fruits and Vegetables 1994
    Sesame Street - Jim Henson - Captain Vegetable 1982
    Frank Zappa and The Mothers of Invention - Call Any Vegetable 1967
    Frank Zappa and The Mothers of Invention - Soft-Sell Conclusion 1967
    Tony Rebel - Fresh Vegetable 1990
    The Beach Boys - Vegetables 1967
    The Darlings with Andy Griffith - Boil Them Cabbage Down 1964
    Frito Lay - The Frito Twist 1960s
    Naomi Hall - Macaroni and Cheese 2000
    Annie Ross - Farmer's Market 1952
    Nancy Jo Berg as Aurora - Jimmy the Boy Wonder: Wonderful Beans! 1966
    Mother Goose - Baked Beans 1977
    Johnny Nicholas - My Rice Ain't Got No Gravy 1994
    Wynonie Harris - I Like My Baby's Puddin' 1950
    Uncle Neptune - Blueberries 2003
    Presidents of the United States of America - Peaches 1995
    Rathergood.com - Cake 2008
    Jimmie Revard and his Oklahoma Playboys - Cake Eating Man 1936
    Tom Smith - Hot Sauce and Ice Cream 2007
    Frank Triolo with the Shipmates Orchestra - Ice Cream Baby 1958
    Shonen Knife - Flying Jelly Attack (live) 1997
    G. Love and Special Sauce - Cold Beverage 1994
    Donny Baker & the Dimensionals - Drinkin' Pop-Sodee Odee (Pop Pop) 1953
    Coca-Cola - Zing! 1962
    Pepsi - Pepsi-Cola Hits the Spot 1939
    Ralph Covert (Ralph's World) - Happy Lemons 2002
  • Post #85 - August 30th, 2008, 9:30 am
    Post #85 - August 30th, 2008, 9:30 am Post #85 - August 30th, 2008, 9:30 am
    I heard this on Sirius' "Backspin" the other day, and this particular verse reads like the occasional LTH rant:

    Rapper's Delight by the Sugarhill Gang:

    [ . . . ]

    like a can of beer that's sweeter than honey
    like a millionaire that has no money
    like a rainy day that is not wet
    like a gamblin fiend that does not bet
    like dracula with out his fangs
    like the boogie to the boogie without the boogie bang
    like collard greens that dont taste good
    like a tree that's not made out of wood
    like goin up and not comin down
    is just like the beat without the sound no sound
    to the beat beat, ya do the freak
    everybody just rock and dance to the beat
    have you ever went over a friends house to eat
    and the food just aint no good
    i mean the macaroni's soggy the peas are mushed
    and the chicken tastes like wood
    so you try to play it off like you think you can
    by sayin that youre full
    and then your friend says momma he's just being polite
    he aint finished uh uh that's bull
    so your heart starts pumpin and you think of a lie
    and you say that you already ate
    and your friend says man there's plenty of food
    so you pile some more on your plate
    while the stinky foods steamin your mind starts to dreamin
    of the moment that it's time to leave
    and then you look at your plate and your chickens slowly rottin
    into something that looks like cheese
    oh so you say that's it i got to leave this place
    i dont care what these people think
    im just sittin here makin myself nauseous
    with this ugly food that stinks
    so you bust out the door while its still closed
    still sick from the food you ate
    and then you run to the store for quick relief
    from a bottle of kaopectate
    and then you call your friend two weeks later
    to see how he has been
    and he says i understand about the food
    baby bubbah but we're still friends
    with a hip hop the hippie to the hippie
    the hip hip a hop a you dont stop the rockin
    to the bang bang boogie
    say up jump the boogie to the rhythm of the boogie the beat
    i say hank can ya rock
    can ya rock to the rhythm that just dont stop
    can ya hip me to the shoobie doo
    i said come on

    [ . . .]
  • Post #86 - November 14th, 2008, 8:56 pm
    Post #86 - November 14th, 2008, 8:56 pm Post #86 - November 14th, 2008, 8:56 pm
    Check out wonderful if eccentric jazz vocalist Slim Gaillard singing “Dunkin Bagel”—“Dunkin bagel . . . splash in the coffee!” From a very amusing website called And You Shall Know Us by the Trail of Our Vinyl, "The Jewish Past as Told by the Records We Have Loved and Lost."

    Attention LAZ: Note the mention of Eartha Kitt's recording of "Rumania, Rumania"! So intriguing, I had to buy the mp3 from Amazon for a whole $0.89.
  • Post #87 - November 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm
    Post #87 - November 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm Post #87 - November 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm
    EvA wrote:Check out wonderful if eccentric jazz vocalist Slim Gaillard singing “Dunkin Bagel”—“Dunkin bagel . . . splash in the coffee!”

    Ay, s'iz a mekhaye -- thanks! I knew Gaillard's "Matzoh Balls," of course, but I hadn't heard this one before.

    Eartha Kitt doing "Rumania Rumania" doesn't surprise me as much as Chubby Checker's "Hava Nagilia Twist"!
  • Post #88 - February 19th, 2009, 4:44 pm
    Post #88 - February 19th, 2009, 4:44 pm Post #88 - February 19th, 2009, 4:44 pm
    Pork music

    Image

    Kraftwurst - We are Pork Products (video)



    Image

    7 Seconds of Love - Fun with Pork (mp3)


    Also check out "Hover Bacon" and "Hitting Pigs with Hammers," among other foodie tunes at http://rathergood.com.
  • Post #89 - February 19th, 2009, 8:17 pm
    Post #89 - February 19th, 2009, 8:17 pm Post #89 - February 19th, 2009, 8:17 pm
    LAZ wrote:Pork music

    Image


    What immortal lines:
    The pigs come from the piggery
    They mince them now we're sausagy.

    Thanks for sharing!
  • Post #90 - April 21st, 2009, 4:46 pm
    Post #90 - April 21st, 2009, 4:46 pm Post #90 - April 21st, 2009, 4:46 pm
    If you want to hear a real good song about the state of fast food, listen to " Junk" by Bronski Beat, a British band from 80's.

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