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My One Shot at Chinese in Chicago: but where?

My One Shot at Chinese in Chicago: but where?
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  • My One Shot at Chinese in Chicago: but where?

    Post #1 - April 4th, 2005, 3:01 pm
    Post #1 - April 4th, 2005, 3:01 pm Post #1 - April 4th, 2005, 3:01 pm
    IIT is bringing me in for a lecture on Friday. They're going to take me out to dinner, I suggested Chinese. My guy said "Phoenix, maybe?"

    Now I know that somewhere in the 25+ pages of this forum there's precisely this discussion reported... but how to find it? Is there a topic index?

    Maybe better would be to simply ask: where would YOU go if you had a single shot like this?

    I grew up in the Bay Area, I've lived in China, I prefer dives over frou-frou, but I'll go frou-frou if the food is THE most genuine. So where would YOU go?

    Tnx for any guidance you might throw my way...

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #2 - April 4th, 2005, 3:06 pm
    Post #2 - April 4th, 2005, 3:06 pm Post #2 - April 4th, 2005, 3:06 pm
    For me, it'd be Lao Sze Chuan, but I know others will pipe in with Mandarin Kitchen, Little Three Happiness, and Ed's Potsticker House, among others.
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #3 - April 4th, 2005, 3:08 pm
    Post #3 - April 4th, 2005, 3:08 pm Post #3 - April 4th, 2005, 3:08 pm
    I'd probably go to Spring World, which has a Yunnanese tilt, but produces pretty solidly across the board. Of course, the board namesake (little) Three Happiness is exactly what you asked for, a dive with delicious food (and some of the best crispy-skin Chicken in the world).

    Moon Palace is a little larger and probably a bit more upscale than the others, but far from Frou-Frou...

    Any of these three would work if it were me - you can search on each individually and get tons of specific dish recommends.
  • Post #4 - April 4th, 2005, 3:16 pm
    Post #4 - April 4th, 2005, 3:16 pm Post #4 - April 4th, 2005, 3:16 pm
    We had a recent dinner at Mandarin Kitchen last week. Click here to read the writeup.
  • Post #5 - April 4th, 2005, 3:40 pm
    Post #5 - April 4th, 2005, 3:40 pm Post #5 - April 4th, 2005, 3:40 pm
    If you like it a bit hot (spicy), I would second Lao Sze Chuan
  • Post #6 - April 4th, 2005, 4:14 pm
    Post #6 - April 4th, 2005, 4:14 pm Post #6 - April 4th, 2005, 4:14 pm
    I would probably second the Spring World rec. as the place is both really good and different than your average Chinese place (especially as compared to, say, Phoenix).

    Nearly all of the menu is there and accessible, but there are a few dishes untranslated and such. One of the greatest Chinese meals I ever had was at Spring World, with the brilliant one doing the ordering. The meal is described below. One caution, for the cold noodles, get the dish in the "wet" vinegar sauce NOT the drier dish with the peanut sauce. The latter is OK, but the former is phenomonal.

    Appetizer plate four ways - conch in a sneaky hot sauce, also very chewy; chicken in black vinegar dressing, maybe the finest dish in the house; mushrooms wrapped around bean curd sheets, more rolls of bean curd than some other local versions; tendon, sliced razor thin, forgotten dressing, but delicious.

    Cold Yunnan noodles, like spaghetti, in a multi-flavor sauce, similar to the chicken, but also very heavy on the cilantro. Could have stopped right here.

    Beef and special mushrooms in a dark rich sauce - This was a Trio-esque type dish where the richness of the beef merged into the richness of these special mushrooms. Blindfolded, you would not know which was which. (A 4 color brochure was provided for us later to learn more about the imported mushrooms.)

    Yunnan ham with leeks - Wow! While I would have loved to have had the ham, procured we are told via a hell of a lot of red-tape, plain with buns, I was plenty happy with this preparation. Yunnan ham really tastes almost exactly like good country ham. The same dense texture, the same intense ham flavor, and the same lingering saltiness that tons of soaking cannot kill. Could have stopped here.

    Pan fried dumplings - A fine, if un-dishtinguished, dish. Larger than typical dumplings

    Chengdu dumplings (a/k/a boiled dumplings) - A superior version, somehow the called for chili oil was not as oily as it could have been. What was the added grated substance, ginger?

    Kung pao chicken - A nod to a first time Chinatowner in our group, yet another superior version. Just the exact amount sauce clinging to the meat and bright fresh peanuts made this a fine dish to eat.

    Pigs feet "Hong Tashen" - Hong Tashen, as explained to me, is a city in Yunnan and the name of Spring World in Chinese. We were not sure if the dish was meant to be in the style of the city Hong Tashen or in the style of the restaurant named Hong Tashen. Regardless, I am now convinced that I like pigs feet as much as I like spicy desserts, meaning a hell of a lot more than I thought I did. This was a spicy dish, loaded with dried chili peppers, yet unlike some dishes at like, Lao Sze Chuan [a great Szechuan restaurant in Chicago], the peppers meant something. OK, fatty, chewy and bony too, but all in a good way. Give in to pigs feet!

    Tofu and Chinese okra - No one was quite sure what is really Chinese okra. We think it is the long green vegetable also called ohba perhaps and used in Indian cooking. This was a mild satisfying dish that played extremely well against the more rich and spicy other courses.

    Soup with pork meatballs - Very loose textured meatballs, reminded me, really of a matzah ball, another milder dish to offer balance.

    Shrimps with a red paste - The only dish I did not appreciate - There was much discussion of the nature of this paste, with most speculation centered around 100 year old eggs. I like a good salt rush like the next guy, but this dish was just odd salty.

    Spicy baby chicken with ginger - I have had this dish at Spring World before, and it has always been good, but this was gooder, as my daughter might say.

    Tilapia fish with horrible looking sauce - Insert gross analogy at will, that tasted perfect.

    Scallion cakes - Is this getting redundant, the best version I have had in Chicago. Wisps of grease, flaky, crisp and puffy in spots, I could have eaten a dozen.

    Fresh fruit and Yunnan style moon cakes - This is not on the menu, but what the house offered us for dessert. Yunnan moon cakes are totally different from the Cantonese versions, no nuts or bean paste. Instead, an extremely flaky dough, from lard I am sure, filled with tiny bits of Yunnan ham.

    Spring World is in the Chinatown Mall alongside Archer Avenue, in Chicago's Chinatown.
    Think Yiddish, Dress British - Advice of Evil Ronnie to me.
  • Post #7 - April 4th, 2005, 5:08 pm
    Post #7 - April 4th, 2005, 5:08 pm Post #7 - April 4th, 2005, 5:08 pm
    another vote here for Lao Sze Chuan: their ma po dou fu's the real deal(and vegetarian oddly enough)---see: Fuscia Dunlop's Land of Plenty. I'm also keen on their potherb in house sauce.
  • Post #8 - April 4th, 2005, 5:47 pm
    Post #8 - April 4th, 2005, 5:47 pm Post #8 - April 4th, 2005, 5:47 pm
    Not that you need another vote, but I third Lao Sze Chuan.
    Sunnie
  • Post #9 - April 4th, 2005, 9:08 pm
    Post #9 - April 4th, 2005, 9:08 pm Post #9 - April 4th, 2005, 9:08 pm
    I'll vote for Spring World. Adding to Rob's menu, I really like the:

    Dan Dan Noodles
    Boiled Beef in Szechuan Sauce
    Eggplant in Garlic Sauce

    they usually have several fish specials, but you have to coax it out of them, because they really don't have any translation available for the specials written on the back wall.
    there's food, and then there's food
  • Post #10 - April 5th, 2005, 12:00 am
    Post #10 - April 5th, 2005, 12:00 am Post #10 - April 5th, 2005, 12:00 am
    I'd say Lao Sichuan or Ed's, depending on your geographical food preference. Ed's is primarly northern Chinese, and Lao is, well, primarily Sichuanese. You can search the board for lots more information about specific dishes at each restaurant.
    If you're going with a large group (more than 10, say), I'd recommend Lao over Ed's because of the sheer amount of room Lao has. I took a group of 16 there last week on a Friday night, and we were seated immediately in the upstairs dining room.
    The great thing about all of the restaurants that have been suggested in this thread so far is that you really can't go wrong - each has at least a couple of dishes that they do extremely well, and if you're willing to follow the advice of the board, it'll be difficult to have a bad Chinese meal.
  • Post #11 - April 5th, 2005, 1:49 am
    Post #11 - April 5th, 2005, 1:49 am Post #11 - April 5th, 2005, 1:49 am
    i'd say LSC too, and Mandarin Kitchen closely behind.

    skip Ed's, even tho it's very very close to IIT. definitely skip the large phoenix due to frou frou-ness. i never actually ordered anything Yunnan @ Spring World, so their Yunnanese attractiveness, tho surely great, is completely lost on me. tho one of these days i'm going to ask them for 'guo qiao mi xian' and 'qi guo ji'' and maybe 'yunnan fried cheese' instead of their ho-hum lunch menu.
  • Post #12 - April 5th, 2005, 6:48 am
    Post #12 - April 5th, 2005, 6:48 am Post #12 - April 5th, 2005, 6:48 am
    AnneVdV wrote: If you're going with a large group (more than 10, say), I'd recommend Lao over Ed's because of the sheer amount of room Lao has. I took a group of 16 there last week on a Friday night, and we were seated immediately in the upstairs dining room.

    Were you the group in the northeast corner with the birthday balloons? I looked through our photos from my own birthday dinner there but this one of Ed's fiancee Beth in her Mr. Skin shirt is the only one that has any of that group in it. On the other hand, at our table we had my brother demonstrating the chicken dance
    Great food too. The combination pan-fried noodles and salt and pepper three delight are just as good downtown as at Westmont. I will also never go again without ordering the Szechwan string beans, which are magnificant.
  • Post #13 - April 5th, 2005, 10:45 am
    Post #13 - April 5th, 2005, 10:45 am Post #13 - April 5th, 2005, 10:45 am
    This is my first post on the board, though I've been a lurking foodie for a while. I just want to note that the Ma Po Dofu at Lao's is MUCH BETTER if it's served the second day, and only slightly warmer than room temperature. The flavors simply don't have time to meld when it's freshly made, and when I make it at home, I always refrigerate it and let it warm up before serving on the second day. When I go to Lao's I always get an order to take out and have it the next day.

    I look forward to participating in this group; the amount of food knowledge here is AMAZING.
  • Post #14 - April 5th, 2005, 12:25 pm
    Post #14 - April 5th, 2005, 12:25 pm Post #14 - April 5th, 2005, 12:25 pm
    dipteran wrote: I just want to note that the Ma Po Dofu at Lao's is MUCH BETTER if it's served the second day, and only slightly warmer than room temperature.


    Funny you should mention. I disagree that it's "much" better. However, the other day I actually had enough of LSC's ma po dou fu leftover for take-home. It's excellent in the restaurant AND it definitely holds up a day later.
    So good.
  • Post #15 - April 5th, 2005, 12:38 pm
    Post #15 - April 5th, 2005, 12:38 pm Post #15 - April 5th, 2005, 12:38 pm
    The absence of any response from the Oriental maven himself, GWIV is puzzling. I'm sure we're all waiting breathlessly to see which restaurant would be his singular choice. For the life of me, I couldn't begin to guess.
  • Post #16 - April 5th, 2005, 5:19 pm
    Post #16 - April 5th, 2005, 5:19 pm Post #16 - April 5th, 2005, 5:19 pm
    RevrendAndy wrote:The absence of any response from the Oriental maven himself, GWIV is puzzling. I'm sure we're all waiting breathlessly to see which restaurant would be his singular choice. For the life of me, I couldn't begin to guess.


    I think he may be having a stroke from disloyalty! :)

    I'm so in love with LTH the idea of going somewhere else is more than I can bear.
    Bruce
    Plenipotentiary
    bruce@bdbbq.com

    Raw meat should NOT have an ingredients list!!
  • Post #17 - April 6th, 2005, 8:11 am
    Post #17 - April 6th, 2005, 8:11 am Post #17 - April 6th, 2005, 8:11 am
    Geo wrote:I grew up in the Bay Area, I've lived in China, I prefer dives over frou-frou, but I'll go frou-frou if the food is THE most genuine. So where would YOU go?

    Geo,

    Dives over frou-frou, you are talking my favorite restaurant in Chicago, and namesake of this board, 'Little' Three Happiness (209 W Cermak), not to be confused with the much larger restaurant on the Northwest corner of Wentworth and Cermak, which serves poorly executed tourist Chinese, similar name, different owners. Short on decor, long on flavor, LTH is a perfect example of Calvin Trillin's "Inverse ambiance theory of Chinese restaurants"

    I have a number of favorites at LTH, roast duck/BBQ pork with pan-fried rice noodles, blue crab dry fried with ginger, scallion and fresh jalapeno, clams in black bean sauce, crisp shell-on salt and pepper shrimp and crispy skin chicken, served with cliantro, lemon wedges and a Sichuan pepper salt mix for dredging is delicious. To name a few.

    Salt and Pepper Shrimp at LTH
    Image

    All the seafood is quite good, as are the casseroles, one of my favorites is squid with sour greens, even the American/Cantonese standards are good. Though the only time I ever order what I would call a suburban Chinese dish is when I am there with someone who just can't handle the thought of sea cucumber in his mixed seafood with pan fried rice noodles or even a shiitake mushroom, for that matter.

    One caveat, most of the time my favorite dish of pan fried rice noodles, ask for them crisp, are wonderfully crisp and delicious. Be aware there can be a bit of inconsistency to the cooking at LTH due to the long hours they are open and chef shift changes and there have been instances of not-so crisp noodles and/or over saucing. Even though I am a regular I always ask for my noodles extra crisp, light on the sauce. Frankly it never hurts to ask and/or reinforce preference, and not just at LTH.

    Plain extra crisp noodle at LTH (Head from crispy skin chicken wanted in on the picture. :) )
    Image

    I keep a bottle of 'Gary's Chili Oil' at LTH, I make my own chili oil and they kindly allow me to keep a supply there, feel free to ask for the oil, though they are currently out, I have a quart in my frig to resupply.

    Most of the other choices are good as well, and fit within your parameters, Ed's House of Potsticker, Lao Sze Chuan , Spring World, Mandarin Kitchen, though I'd add Shui Wah to the mix as well. Hope you have a wonderful meal and please let us know what you decided and how it went.

    Here are a few LTHForum links to restaurants discussed in this thread.
    'Little' Three Happiness pictures
    'Little' Three Happiness
    'Little' Three Happiness
    'Little' Three Happiness
    Mandarin Kitchen
    Mandarin Kitchen
    Mandarin Kitchen
    Ed's House of Potsticker
    Lao Sze Chuan

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    "Little' Three Happiness
    209 W Cermak Rd
    Chicago, IL 60616
    312-842-1964
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #18 - April 6th, 2005, 6:46 pm
    Post #18 - April 6th, 2005, 6:46 pm Post #18 - April 6th, 2005, 6:46 pm
    Ahhhh! You guys are driving me CRAZY! I'm thinking maybe I'll cut the lecture in half, rule out any questions, and make them take me immediately if not sooner to.....

    And now you see my quandieary: where to go?!

    OK, I've cut down the wonderful list down to just two:

    LTH

    or

    The Venerable Four Rivers (Lao Sze Chuan!)

    I'm thinking maybe I'd like the food and experience at LSC maybe a little better, but my hosts have googled both places and after reading this

    http://centerstage.net/restaurants/lao-sze-chuan.html

    they got cold feet. I told them not to worry, I speak just enough putonghua to keep us out of trouble (as if!)

    On the other hand, Gwiv's special pleading is pretty persuasive, and, I *must* keep in mind that this Forum, which is constantly sustaining my life and spirit, is, after all, namesaked. So maybe LTH is demanded by loyalty and tradition.

    I'll keep you posted.

    (And Gwiv? *loved* the chicken head! I set up a banquet for my pals in the Madison Philosophy Dept. at Hong Kong Cafe. Chef said he'd steam a whole chicken for the drunken chicken starter. I said "ok. But I want the WHOLE chicken." I think it was the first time he'd ever sent the head and feet to a table of Big Noses. Some of my colleagues were delightfully repelled sort of. )

    Man, I keep thinking of ma po tofu; alternating with salt and pepper triple delight. BTW, 'spoze they have this latter at the Chinatown LSC? (careful how you answer this--it *could* tip the balance.

    I'll keep you posted. Maybe I'd best take my camera along (as if I'd take time out from eating...)

    Tnx y'awl, this has been a multiple-delight, it really has.

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #19 - April 6th, 2005, 7:14 pm
    Post #19 - April 6th, 2005, 7:14 pm Post #19 - April 6th, 2005, 7:14 pm
    Geo wrote:Man, I keep thinking of ma po tofu; alternating with salt and pepper triple delight. BTW, 'spoze they have this latter at the Chinatown LSC? (careful how you answer this--it *could* tip the balance.


    yes, lsc in chinatown has s+p three delight.
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #20 - April 6th, 2005, 7:34 pm
    Post #20 - April 6th, 2005, 7:34 pm Post #20 - April 6th, 2005, 7:34 pm
    Geo wrote: I'm thinking maybe I'd like the food and experience at LSC maybe a little better, but my hosts have googled both places and after reading this

    http://centerstage.net/restaurants/lao-sze-chuan.html

    they got cold feet.

    That Centerstage review of Lao Sze Chuan is out of date, if it was ever really true. When they first opened (1999?) there were major sections of the menu in Chinese only. By 2001 (or before) the very extensive menu was bilingual and remains so to this day. There are a few listings in Chinese on the wall, and for those you’re on your own (or ask for a translation; many waiters can help or if owner Tony is around be sure to talk with him). Lao Sze Chuan has been reviewed by just about every Chicago paper and magazine, and is listed in Zagat. Consequently, a very substantial number of customers will be non-Chinese. Despite all this fame and popularity, LSC has remained at or near the top since the beginning. The menu (in English only) can be found on Lao Sze Chuan's website.
  • Post #21 - April 6th, 2005, 7:45 pm
    Post #21 - April 6th, 2005, 7:45 pm Post #21 - April 6th, 2005, 7:45 pm
    Rene G wrote: Lao Sze Chuan has been reviewed by just about every Chicago paper and magazine, and is listed in Zagat. Consequently, a very substantial number of customers will be non-Chinese.


    Indeed. In the second floor room on friday it was probably about 2:1 non-chinese to chinese, and it was about 1:1 on the first floor on sunday.

    The americans at the table behind us gave hot pot a shot, with Tony's help. He guided them through the process, even though it was a fairly busy night, and I suspect they left satisfied. I've never had bad service at any restaurant in chinatown, and that includes LSC.

    That's not to say there aren't service missteps -- on sunday they brought us Dry Chile Chicken instead of Three Chile Chicken, but I think that's a pretty easy mistake to make. Dry and Three sound somewhat alike, and English wasn't our waiter's first language.

    For what it's worth (very little, IMO), zagat's readers have rated LSC "Best Authentic Chinese in Chicago" for the past 3 years.
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #22 - April 6th, 2005, 7:59 pm
    Post #22 - April 6th, 2005, 7:59 pm Post #22 - April 6th, 2005, 7:59 pm
    Geo wrote:I'm thinking maybe I'd like the food and experience at LSC maybe a little better, but my hosts have googled both places and after reading this

    http://centerstage.net/restaurants/lao-sze-chuan.html

    they got cold feet. I told them not to worry, I speak just enough putonghua to keep us out of trouble (as if!)

    On the other hand, Gwiv's special pleading is pretty persuasive, and, I *must* keep in mind that this Forum, which is constantly sustaining my life and spirit, is, after all, namesaked. So maybe LTH is demanded by loyalty and tradition.


    LSC and LTH are well within walking distance of each other. Have some food at one and then walk over to the other one to finish the meal. :twisted:
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #23 - April 7th, 2005, 12:55 pm
    Post #23 - April 7th, 2005, 12:55 pm Post #23 - April 7th, 2005, 12:55 pm
    gleam wrote:

    yes, lsc in chinatown has s+p three delight.


    But I couldn't seem to find it anywhere on the web *dinner* menu at LSC. The only s+p in the seafood seems to be "small fish". s+p prawns is on the lunch specials menu, tho'.

    Is it there but I'm missing it?

    There is SOOO much wonderful looking stuff there--I think I'll order one each of the vegetables... to begin with.

    Geo[/quote]
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #24 - April 7th, 2005, 1:12 pm
    Post #24 - April 7th, 2005, 1:12 pm Post #24 - April 7th, 2005, 1:12 pm
    Geo wrote: I couldn't seem to find it anywhere on the web *dinner* menu at LSC.
    Is it there but I'm missing it?



    Yes, it took me a while, but the menu is more than will fit on one page so you can click and scroll down once you're in, for example, the "seafood" page. Seafood starts at item 401, and ends at 486 (and that tells you a lot about the place right there). "Salt and Pepper Three Delight" is number 464.

    Lao Sze Chuan menu
  • Post #25 - April 7th, 2005, 1:36 pm
    Post #25 - April 7th, 2005, 1:36 pm Post #25 - April 7th, 2005, 1:36 pm
    Tnx Ann,

    The seafood pg won't scroll--I can get to 401-418 only. All other sections (e.g., vegetables 601-642) scroll perfectly.

    Probably a mismatch between my Mac's Safari browser and the site.

    Your help is much 'preciated.

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #26 - April 8th, 2005, 5:31 pm
    Post #26 - April 8th, 2005, 5:31 pm Post #26 - April 8th, 2005, 5:31 pm
    OMG, now I finally know what LTH Forum stands for! I do not believe this is part of the FAQ and should be!

    :)

    Christine
  • Post #27 - April 9th, 2005, 4:40 pm
    Post #27 - April 9th, 2005, 4:40 pm Post #27 - April 9th, 2005, 4:40 pm
    We went early to LSC (5:30) and they sat us upstairs, all 8 of us, where we were alone in the sunshine of a lovely early Spring late afternoon. Cubs opener, hey?!

    We got spicy cabbage strips for an amuse bouche. Our bouches were very amused! Just enough heat, tangy sauce. OK, here's my order:

    114 Jelly Fish Shanghai Style

    117 Spinach w/Ginger Sauce

    208 String Beans Spicy Black Bean Sauce

    464 Salt & Pepper Three Delight

    518 Pork Hunk w/Sour Pickle

    552 Mongolian Lamb

    609 Ma Po Tofu

    618 Garlic Peapod Leafs

    619 House Special Potherb

    709 House Special Fried Noodles (two orders, crispy)

    Overall the food was light (elegant, in fact), super fresh, and quite frequently inventive. The sauces were superb: natually thickened, very rich. Sauce from the pork hunk was fine and made the rice sing.

    In my estimation the lamb was the most perfect: tender, juicy, *very* lamby-flavored, and the spring onion heads were cooked to that exact millisecond when they were precisely between still-crunchy and overcooked--an almost impossible stage to not just reach, but capture.

    Ginger spinach: lovely sauce, perfectly-wilted, very fresh spinich.

    Jellyfish: as good as it gets. Many of my colleagues had never had it (altho' 2 were regulars at LSC). Everyone marvelled at the crunch, which, of course, is the point!

    I'm *very* good with noodles, as good as any civillian you'll ever find, but I have sought for yrs to perfect the al dente that these noodles came out of the kitchen with. Amount of sauce was perfect, not the least bit soupy.

    The peapod leaves and the string beans were both novel--how in the world did he figure out how to mound the former and chop the latter? The string bean pieces were *exactly* the size of the black beans, and so also the mushroom bits. Perfectly cooked, lightly sauced, ummm.

    Can't imagine how/why the ma po dofu was as good as it was, w/o meat. How did he do that? Wonderful on the rice.

    OK, some negatives. The s+p 3 delight was small in quantity, I never did find any shrimp, and, although the pieces were perfectly fresh and perfectly cooked, there wasn't anything either interesting or special--so far as I could taste--about the flavors.

    The potherb was so salty as to be inedible. I should have sent it back.

    I want to thank everyone who took part in advising me where to go! This was certainly one of the finest meals, let alone Chinese meals, I've had in a good long time. Next time I go to Chicago, I'm going to find a motel near the Square and stay about a week.

    The LTH Forum is certainly one of Chicagoland's most wonderful cultural institutions.

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)

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