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Polk & Western Hot-Dogs [pics]

Polk & Western Hot-Dogs [pics]
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    Post #1 - May 27th, 2005, 2:37 pm
    Post #1 - May 27th, 2005, 2:37 pm Post #1 - May 27th, 2005, 2:37 pm
    Polk & Western Hot-Dogs
    and the hidden treasures of Tri-Taylor

    Straight away I must say that Polk & Western has already been explored and discussed by Gary and Rene G, and I should further add that I, being an inveterate slow-food kind of a guy, do not claim to have the experience and knowledge of fast-food places of P&W's sort that those two veteran explorers and some others on this board have. Here are the important links:

    GWiv's post with his notes from a visit last year.
    Rene G's post in Lefflandia (link) and his more recent post on LTH (link).

    So then, one might well ask: "Why is this guy writing about Polk & Western Hot-Dogs?" Well, the reason is that I only live one long block away (as the crow flies, that is; it's a little further for law-abiding pedestrians) and, as I mentioned elsewhere, I have been breathing in and analysing the quality of P&W's grease smells on an almost quotidian basis -- typically on the way to or from Masi's Italian Superior Bakery -- for more than a half year. Today, from my usual smelling-vantage point (corner of Polk and Western), a fair spring breeze brought l'air de friture to my twitching nose and, lo, the grease smelled fresh -- around the corner and in I went.

    Image

    On weekdays, P&W is always fairly busy at lunch time and today was no exception. Observing the ordering customs of regulars, I came to the conclusion that the 'special', mentioned by Gary in his notes (see link above) was the way to go. Since I'm currently on the South Side Dog Diet, I got both a hot-dog with everything and a polish with everything. The polish cost slightly more than the hot dog (which was ca. $2.60) but even so, the two specials together were only about $5.70. Here's how the two look, still on their wrapping paper, in which (as noted by Gary and ReneG) the fries were placed:

    Image

    I don't need to add much to what has already been said by my predecessors and so will be brief. I thought both dog and polish were quite good, though I will make no effort to compare them to or rank them against others available in Chicago. The fries did indeed seem to be fresh cut in house (irregular form, raw fries soaking in bin in back). As I said, I do notice different levels of freshness to P&W's air de friture and today it smelled fresh and the fries tasted quite good. My one, alas, not insignificant criticism, was that to my mind, the frying method used was not up to snuff. More precisely, I surmise these are once fried fries and that the temperature of the oil was such that by the time the fries were nicely browned, they had also absorbed a lot of oil. In any event, they were tasty but quite greasy.

    All in all, my first experience at P&W was a good one; thanks to Gary and ReneG.

    ***

    By the way, immediately to the north of Polk & Western Hot-Dogs is the never opened Geno Bahena restaurant, Apaxtleco, which was once upon a time a very small church. Before Bahena bought the building, a member of the Damenzo's family had an Italian restaurant there which I have heard was pretty good. A friend of mine who ate there also said it was really quite beautiful inside. Here's the front, but a few steps up from P&W:

    Image

    Grüßen aus Drei-Schneider!
    Antonius




    Polk & Western Hot-Dogs
    749 South Western Avenue
    Chicago (Tri-Taylor)
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #2 - May 27th, 2005, 2:51 pm
    Post #2 - May 27th, 2005, 2:51 pm Post #2 - May 27th, 2005, 2:51 pm
    Thanks Antonius for mentioning Apaxtleco. I have been meaning to ask you what this place was, but I could never remember the spelling. I drive by it every day, and make an effort to remember the spelling, but by the time I get to Evanston, I could never remember it.

    Do you know if P&W makes char dogs? I have been craving one since I left Buffalo... I miss Ted's Red Hots.... =)
  • Post #3 - May 27th, 2005, 3:08 pm
    Post #3 - May 27th, 2005, 3:08 pm Post #3 - May 27th, 2005, 3:08 pm
    CrazyC wrote:Do you know if P&W makes char dogs? I have been craving one since I left Buffalo... I miss Ted's Red Hots.... =)


    CrazyC:

    Sorry, I can't say for sure about char dogs, but next time I walk by, I'll take a peek at their menu...

    They do have french fry sandwiches and, I think, tamale sandwiches as well!

    :shock: :D

    A
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #4 - May 27th, 2005, 3:17 pm
    Post #4 - May 27th, 2005, 3:17 pm Post #4 - May 27th, 2005, 3:17 pm
    Thanks for the pics and write-up, Antonius. I drove by P+W on my way to Freddy's in Cicero this morning and was sorely tempted to go in for a bite. At 10:30am.

    But then I remembered my original destination, and the image of homemade sopressata soon took over.

    The greasy hand-cut fry is a somewhat familiar one for me. The hot dog stand in Forest Park, Parky's, is notorious for their incredibly greasy french fries. My method has always been to ask for them "well done" or "extra crispy". It isn't as good as a double fry -- what I do at home -- but the extra cooking time seems to do a decent job of expelling a lot of the extra grease.

    -ed
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #5 - May 27th, 2005, 3:27 pm
    Post #5 - May 27th, 2005, 3:27 pm Post #5 - May 27th, 2005, 3:27 pm
    gleam wrote:Thanks for the pics and write-up, Antonius. I drove by P+W on my way to Freddy's in Cicero this morning and was sorely tempted to go in for a bite. At 10:30am.

    But then I remembered my original destination, and the image of homemade sopressata soon took over.


    Hmmm... In answer to the perro caliente a la Mexicana...*

    Image

    ... how 'bout a cane caldo all'Italiana, wrapped in sopessata and dessed with... Nah!!!

    You're right: Freddy's homemade sopressata is delicious.

    A

    * This perrito is one Amata and I had at Oscar's (link)

    Typo fixed.
    Last edited by Antonius on May 28th, 2005, 9:14 am, edited 1 time in total.
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #6 - May 27th, 2005, 3:36 pm
    Post #6 - May 27th, 2005, 3:36 pm Post #6 - May 27th, 2005, 3:36 pm
    Antonius wrote:... how 'bout a cane caldo all'Italiana, wrapped in sopessata and dessed with... Nah!!!


    At that point we're just getting into this guy's territory.
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #7 - May 27th, 2005, 5:02 pm
    Post #7 - May 27th, 2005, 5:02 pm Post #7 - May 27th, 2005, 5:02 pm
    Crazy C wrote:Do you know if P&W makes char dogs? I have been craving one since I left Buffalo... I miss Ted's Red Hots.... =)

    Polk & Western is a pretty traditional Chicago hot dog stand and as such I don’t think they offer char dogs (or ketchup, but I didn’t try asking). Even though I’ve come to appreciate a traditional Chicago hot dog I happen to like char dogs even more and think Ted’s in Buffalo makes one of the very best examples. Ah, for a foot-long and a loganberry! In Chicago the best char dogs I’ve had are from Wiener’s Circle but they’re just not the same.

    Antonius wrote: They do have french fry sandwiches and, I think, tamale sandwiches as well!

    Indeed they do! These oddities seem to be more common at the older stands, particularly on the south side. I find it interesting that a tamale-on-a-bun-with-chili is sometimes called a Mother in Law. If anyone has any ideas why this might be I’d like to hear them. Fat Johnnie’s (7242 S Western) is one stand that sells a Mother in Law but even FJ himself couldn’t say for sure. I’ll try to get back to this topic but I have a few things to check on first.
  • Post #8 - May 27th, 2005, 5:25 pm
    Post #8 - May 27th, 2005, 5:25 pm Post #8 - May 27th, 2005, 5:25 pm
    Rene G wrote:I find it interesting that a tamale-on-a-bun-with-chili is sometimes called a Mother in Law. If anyone has any ideas why this might be I’d like to hear them.


    This is a fascinating question. If you do a Google search for "mother-in-law tongues" you get a number of hits that, on the one hand, deal with a plant of this name, but also, there are a number of recipes and dishes with this name. The group of dishes is fairly eclectic it seems to me, at least from looking through them quite quickly. But it somehow doesn't seem wholly inappropriate to include the dish you describe within this group. It's certainly a subject that warrants a little additional investigation.

    Some examples, both sweet and savory (and also the name of a shape of pasta):

    http://www.pepperfool.com/recipes/pork/mother.html

    http://www.laraccolta.com/recipes.php/tmpl/35

    http://www.laraccolta.com/subcategory.php?prodID=191

    http://metamorphosism.com/archives/000243.html

    http://www.mariofongo.com/english/lingue_di_suocera.htm

    http://recipes.chef2chef.net/recipe-arc ... 7581.shtml
    (very similar or identical to the first)

    http://www.brunetti.com.au/Biscuits.html

    http://www.tpo.net/cooking/Recipes/pork/mother.htm

    http://recipecircus.com/cgi-bin/recipes ... ngues.html

    Upon further review, it looks like the group of recipes (I haven't looked, they may all be the same recipe) that includes hungarian wax peppers, thai dragon peppers, hot sausage, marinara, onion, and mozzarella is quite reminiscent of chili. I'm still not sure where the name for this recipe comes from. The other grouping seems to be an Italian sweet. And then the pasta shape. Curious.

    Aha!

    from http://www.aliottas.com/latimes.htm is a piece of information which is perhaps the missing link:

    beginning with a snappy tapenade of marinated garlic, herbs and spicy serrano chiles with not a trace of oil, served with flat bread sticks affectionately known as "mother-in-law tongues" (for their shape and mild bite).


    Or at least a missing link...

    Very interesting.
  • Post #9 - May 27th, 2005, 5:38 pm
    Post #9 - May 27th, 2005, 5:38 pm Post #9 - May 27th, 2005, 5:38 pm
    Rene G wrote:Polk & Western is a pretty traditional Chicago hot dog stand and as such I don’t think they offer char dogs (or ketchup, but I didn’t try asking)...


    Rene G:

    They do have ketchup and the woman just ahead of me asked them to apply said substance to both her fries AND her dog. They mustn't be too DOGmatic about it because the lad taking care of her order obliged her without batting an eyelash, much less a whip.


    Rene G wrote:
    Antonius wrote: They do have french fry sandwiches and, I think, tamale sandwiches as well!

    Indeed they do! These oddities seem to be more common at the older stands, particularly on the south side. I find it interesting that a tamale-on-a-bun-with-chili is sometimes called a Mother in Law. If anyone has any ideas why this might be I’d like to hear them. Fat Johnnie’s (7242 S Western) is one stand that sells a Mother in Law but even FJ himself couldn’t say for sure. I’ll try to get back to this topic but I have a few things to check on first.


    I for one would be interested in further information you might have on these (to my mind) exotic items.

    :D

    Thanks again for the old write-up and for bringing it to our attention with the link.

    A
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #10 - May 27th, 2005, 6:09 pm
    Post #10 - May 27th, 2005, 6:09 pm Post #10 - May 27th, 2005, 6:09 pm
    CrazyC wrote:Thanks Antonius for mentioning Apaxtleco. I have been meaning to ask you what this place was, but I could never remember the spelling. I drive by it every day, and make an effort to remember the spelling, but by the time I get to Evanston, I could never remember it.

    Do you know if P&W makes char dogs? I have been craving one since I left Buffalo... I miss Ted's Red Hots.... =)


    If it's char dogs you carve and it's Evanston you're in, then head West to Poochie's for one of the best char dogs in the area.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #11 - May 27th, 2005, 7:36 pm
    Post #11 - May 27th, 2005, 7:36 pm Post #11 - May 27th, 2005, 7:36 pm
    stevez wrote:Do you know if P&W makes char dogs? I have been craving one since I left Buffalo... I miss Ted's Red Hots.... =)


    If it's char dogs you carve and it's Evanston you're in, then head West to Poochie's for one of the best char dogs in the area.[/quote]

    Precisely what I was about to suggest. Poochie's makes pretty much
    everything "char" - they do have a normal dog, but its the one exception.
    Their burgers, polish, dogs, salami etc - theyre all "char". And they do a
    pretty decent char-dog IMHO.

    If youre in Evanston, its pretty close - just drive down Dempster. Its only about
    a half-mile past McCormick (where Evanston turns into Skokie).

    c8w
  • Post #12 - May 27th, 2005, 7:52 pm
    Post #12 - May 27th, 2005, 7:52 pm Post #12 - May 27th, 2005, 7:52 pm
    Antonius - it may be my eyesight or the lighting for the picture . . . I don't see any tomato. I'm not certain on the hot dog if, in the middle, that might be a lone cucumber slice or just the light hitting some onion in a specific way. I mention this only because my experience with Chicago dogs has 'everything' including both tomato slice AND at least one of either cucumber slices OR a pickle spear. I understand you take no claim as to being a fast food specialist, I'm just curious to know what was on the dog.

    For shame on that youngster for applying ketchup to the dog. I admire those establisments that either simply don't have ketchup and say so (loudly) or make a half-hearted gesture with their heads that it's over there and you can put it on yourself. I'm firmly convinced that people that put ketchup on hotdogs are not from this planet. When the big alien-human wars come (and they will!) I plan to use this tell-tale to my advantage. :twisted:
    Objects in mirror appear to be losing.
  • Post #13 - May 27th, 2005, 9:55 pm
    Post #13 - May 27th, 2005, 9:55 pm Post #13 - May 27th, 2005, 9:55 pm
    Kman wrote:Antonius - it may be my eyesight or the lighting for the picture . . . I don't see any tomato. I'm not certain on the hot dog if, in the middle, that might be a lone cucumber slice or just the light hitting some onion in a specific way. I mention this only because my experience with Chicago dogs has 'everything' including both tomato slice AND at least one of either cucumber slices OR a pickle spear. I understand you take no claim as to being a fast food specialist, I'm just curious to know what was on the dog.

    For shame on that youngster for applying ketchup to the dog. I admire those establisments that either simply don't have ketchup and say so (loudly) or make a half-hearted gesture with their heads that it's over there and you can put it on yourself. I'm firmly convinced that people that put ketchup on hotdogs are not from this planet. When the big alien-human wars come (and they will!) I plan to use this tell-tale to my advantage. :twisted:


    IMHO, the tomato slice and cucumber (although not the dill pickle) are Johnnies Come Lately to the Chicago Hot Dog Scene. When I was a kid, hot dogs came with mustard, relish, onions and (sometimes) a hot pepper or two. I never even saw a tomato applied to a dog until I was at least 10 years old. This tradition (including the greasy, single fry/packed with the dog style of fries) is carried on to this day by Jene & Judes and, it appears, by Polk & Western. I'm looking forward to a visit.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #14 - May 27th, 2005, 10:07 pm
    Post #14 - May 27th, 2005, 10:07 pm Post #14 - May 27th, 2005, 10:07 pm
    Antonius,

    Any thoughts about the shrimp place just across the street to the north of Masi's?

    I will bite my tongue to refrain from the hot dog wars of opinion:-)
  • Post #15 - May 27th, 2005, 10:39 pm
    Post #15 - May 27th, 2005, 10:39 pm Post #15 - May 27th, 2005, 10:39 pm
    Kman wrote:Antonius - it may be my eyesight or the lighting for the picture . . . I don't see any tomato.

    Kman,

    Polk & Western, Gene & Jude's, Jimmy's are all, what I refer to as, minimalist style. No tomato, no salad, just the basics. This is my preferred style, my typical hot dog order being mustard/onion/sport pepper.

    Antonious, really nice pictures and I'm glad your nose allowed you to hit Polk & Western on a 'good grease' day. (You have some sniffer :) )

    Note to AnnieB. I've only been to the shrimp place just North of Masi's once, on the Western-a-Thon, and may have caught them on an off day, but I say mediocre at best.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Sauce on the side, always, implied, axiomatic..........never a doubt, BBQ sauce without.

    Low & Slow
  • Post #16 - May 28th, 2005, 9:23 am
    Post #16 - May 28th, 2005, 9:23 am Post #16 - May 28th, 2005, 9:23 am
    stevez wrote:IMHO, the tomato slice and cucumber (although not the dill pickle) are Johnnies Come Lately to the Chicago Hot Dog Scene. When I was a kid, hot dogs came with mustard, relish, onions and (sometimes) a hot pepper or two. I never even saw a tomato applied to a dog until I was at least 10 years old. This tradition (including the greasy, single fry/packed with the dog style of fries) is carried on to this day by Jene & Judes and, it appears, by Polk & Western. I'm looking forward to a visit.


    Steve:

    That's interesting about the condiments and, indeed, it seems the owner of P&W is conscious and proud of a simple and very traditional, no-nonsense approach to the Chicago style hot dog (see further Gary's and Rene G's notes). Despite all the grease, I found the fry-and-dog combo all wrapped together somehow charming (if that's the right word). Plus some of the grease rubs off on the bun... :)

    ***

    Kman:

    What appears possibly to be a cucumber or some other such halesome titbit is in fact none other than the second of the twofold team of sport peppers adorning each sausage. The condiments that come at P&W in response to the request "with everything" are, as noted by GWiv and Rene G, "[s]ame [as at Gene & Jude's] simple condiments: bright yellow mustard, green (not fluorescent) relish, chopped onions, and sport peppers." And in this humble Jerseyman's opinion, this is the optimal combination. I would have liked the peppers to have been a little spicier, though perhaps only because they looked so much like some sinus clearing pickled chiles güeros I have in the fridge. That being said, though, one of the four was pretty piquant and added a nice extra element to the pleasure of eating the second half of the polish.

    Kman wrote:For shame on that youngster for applying ketchup to the dog. I admire those establisments that either simply don't have ketchup and say so (loudly) or make a half-hearted gesture with their heads that it's over there and you can put it on yourself. I'm firmly convinced that people that put ketchup on hotdogs are not from this planet. When the big alien-human wars come (and they will!) I plan to use this tell-tale to my advantage. :twisted:


    The person -- alien life-form, perhaps, in your view -- in question was a thirty-somethingish woman who seemed, at least superficially, to be human or at the very least strongly humanoid (no antennae, no gills, no extra mandibles, no suction cups on the appendages,; pretty much the basic set of arms and legs and such).

    I can see your point, perhaps, but I think P&W is being extra-cool; so secure are they in their own sense of identity and comfortable with their rôle in the maintenance of local culinary culture, that they see no reason to humiliate a paying customer, no matter how benighted she be.

    ***

    Annieb:

    I went to Western Avenue Shrimp House once last fall and was so unhappy I have felt no inclination to go back (but again, I generally prefer to cook at home and so my desire to go out or get take out is not all that strong anyway most of the time). To be specific, out of a sizeable bag of shrimp, I would say fully 40-50% of them had the strong taste of iodine, which I associate with a lack of freshness and/or non-removal of the euphemistically named 'vein'. To my mind, NO shrimp should taste like that but I've had many here in Chicago. A similar experience with shrimp (ca. 30% tasting of iodine) from Lawrence Fisheries on Canal (just north of Cermak, on the river) has inclined me to eschew all places that call themselves "shrimp houses" around here, though I know I've seen reports of good shrimp houses on the board; those notwithstanding, I'm sceptical about them.

    All in all, I'd have to say that for the moment Gary's assessment, that Western Avenue Shrimp House is only "mediocre at best," should stand, though with fairness in mind, such a negative judgement needs to be confirmed with one or two more experiences. Any volunteers?

    Antonius
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #17 - May 28th, 2005, 10:25 am
    Post #17 - May 28th, 2005, 10:25 am Post #17 - May 28th, 2005, 10:25 am
    Kman wrote:For shame on that youngster for applying ketchup to the dog. I admire those establisments that either simply don't have ketchup and say so (loudly) or make a half-hearted gesture with their heads that it's over there and you can put it on yourself. I'm firmly convinced that people that put ketchup on hotdogs are not from this planet. When the big alien-human wars come (and they will!) I plan to use this tell-tale to my advantage. :twisted:


    Kman, you seem like a decent kind of guy, so I'll refrain from my usual response to this kind of virulent anti-catsup claptrap. Suffice it to say that your aversion to catsup, so closely linked to feelings of childhood shame, aggression and paranoia, is, alas, typical...and thus forgiveable. :twisted: :roll: :twisted:

    Hammond
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #18 - May 28th, 2005, 1:35 pm
    Post #18 - May 28th, 2005, 1:35 pm Post #18 - May 28th, 2005, 1:35 pm
    Mr. Hammond - I firmly acknowledge that ketchup has its place, it's just that on top of a hotdog is not it. On the fries served with the dog, fine (though I prefer mayo or hot sauce). And it's awfully hurtful for you to remind me of that childhood trauma I experienced watching my parents put ketchup on their scrambled eggs and scrapple. :shock:

    :)
    Objects in mirror appear to be losing.
  • Post #19 - May 28th, 2005, 3:29 pm
    Post #19 - May 28th, 2005, 3:29 pm Post #19 - May 28th, 2005, 3:29 pm
    Kman wrote:Mr. Hammond - I firmly acknowledge that ketchup has its place, it's just that on top of a hotdog is not it. On the fries served with the dog, fine (though I prefer mayo or hot sauce). And it's awfully hurtful for you to remind me of that childhood trauma I experienced watching my parents put ketchup on their scrambled eggs and scrapple. :shock:

    :)


    But, a question for those who really abhore the notion of ketchup on a dog: If you go to a place that wraps the dog together with the fries, as done at P&W, and the only ketchup available is from a large ketchup-squirt-extruder-delivery-mechanism located beyond the counter (i.e., no little packets available), and yet you really like ketchup on your fries... (here's the question):
    Do you accept the risk of letting the dog-assembly person apply ketchup to the fries before wrapping which may lead to inadvertant contact of ketchup to dog-bun-condiment combo or do you just forego the ketchup altogether?

    Just wondering... I had my dog and fries sans ketchup. (I prefer mayo on fries, à la Belge, but with the greasiness of the P&W fries and the double dose of sausage, that would have been really over the top!).

    Also, Kman, I remember that back in the day, when a fried egg sandwich was a pretty common 'fast-food' item (not quite back around World War I but a while ago), I also remember most folks putting ketchup on those. So, cut your 'rents a little slack on that one... As for scrapple... well, I'm not sure what proper scrapple etiquette is...

    :)

    Antonius
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #20 - May 28th, 2005, 5:06 pm
    Post #20 - May 28th, 2005, 5:06 pm Post #20 - May 28th, 2005, 5:06 pm
    Antonius wrote:But, a question for those who really abhore the notion of ketchup on a dog: If you go to a place that wraps the dog together with the fries, as done at P&W, and the only ketchup available is from a large ketchup-squirt-extruder-delivery-mechanism located beyond the counter (i.e., no little packets available), and yet you really like ketchup on your fries... (here's the question):
    Do you accept the risk of letting the dog-assembly person apply ketchup to the fries before wrapping which may lead to inadvertant contact of ketchup to dog-bun-condiment combo or do you just forego the ketchup altogether?


    Absolutely not! The proper etiquette is to ask for the squirt bottle and apply the ketchup to your fries yourself after they have been separated from contact with the dog. I've never been to a hot dog stand where a ketchup squirt bottle wasn't descretely kept behing the counter for just such instances. Barring that, I would ask the counter person to squirt some ketchup on a hot dog wrapping paper and take that to the table separately in order to dip your fries as needed.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #21 - November 8th, 2014, 2:18 pm
    Post #21 - November 8th, 2014, 2:18 pm Post #21 - November 8th, 2014, 2:18 pm
    (re-posted from Openings and Closings thread)

    New owners for Polk and Western Hot Dogs

    Last winter, sometime around Christmas or New Year's, Polk and Western abruptly closed. I was too upset to post about it here.

    After missing their sublime fries for months we were delighted to see a new awning go up and a "Grand Opening" banner out front this weekend. We hastened to try it out.

    It's not the same people running the place -- it's now owned by Damenzo's. The menu still has the basics but has expanded to include burgers, a chicken sandwich, fish sandwich, and a pork chop sandwich. The french fry sandwich of the old menu is gone. "Everything" is no longer the minimalist style of old, but rather "Chicago style". And, sad to say, the fries are exactly like those found at Damenzo's two blocks away, limp and greasy. <sigh>

    The woman I spoke to said they will re-open the ice cream side of the business next spring, and are trying out homemade ice cream recipes. So that sounds promising...

    Polk and Western Hot Dogs
    749 S Western Ave

    Damenzo's Pizza
    2324 W Taylor St
    Polk and Western.jpg

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