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Bulgarian Deli

Bulgarian Deli
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  • Bulgarian Deli

    Post #1 - June 20th, 2005, 9:15 pm
    Post #1 - June 20th, 2005, 9:15 pm Post #1 - June 20th, 2005, 9:15 pm
    LTH,

    Driving down Lincoln Ave this morning I got a coffee craving just as I passed Mekato's, a Colombian bakery with a wide assortment of breads, sweets and a few prepared items. There are stools set up along a counter and a comfortable table in the window. I'm partial to their arepa, empanadas and coffee.

    Just a few doors South is Bulgarian Deli, which I had been meaning to visit since I saw the sign go up a month or two ago. Bulgarian Deli is a relatively small store front with a selection of pickles, jams, ajvar etc. There's also fresh Cevapcici, cured sausage, meats and Bulgarian feta. I tried Pastarma, which is (I think) dry cured veal and also Kaizer Pastarama, which is the same with pepper. The Pastarama reminded me of Armenian basturma in appearance, taste and texture, which I very much enjoy.

    The very cordial counter person, Diana, informed me on weekends the hot case, which was empty, is filled with prepared items including stuffed lamb. The same people who own Bulgarian Deli also own The Cafe, which I take it is Bulgarian as well.

    This is an interesting little section of Lincoln Ave. In a half-block there is a Taqueria, whose name I forget, a Columbian restaurant, Columbian bakery and Bulgarian deli.

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    Bulgarian Deli
    5415 N Lincoln
    Chicago, IL 60625
    773-728-5651

    Mekato's Colombian Bakery
    5423 N Lincoln
    Chicago, IL 60625
    773-784-5181

    Pueblito Viejo
    5429 N Lincoln
    Chicago, IL

    The Cafe
    5115 N Lincoln
    Chicago, IL 60625
    773-275-5025
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #2 - June 20th, 2005, 9:53 pm
    Post #2 - June 20th, 2005, 9:53 pm Post #2 - June 20th, 2005, 9:53 pm
    I tried Pastarma, which is (I think) dry cured veal and also Kaizer Pastarama, which is the same with pepper. The Pastarama reminded me of Armenian basturma in appearance, taste and texture, which I very much enjoy.


    Basturma and Pastarma are the same, with variances only in the linguistic transliteration and the usual differences in regional recipes.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
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  • Post #3 - June 21st, 2005, 2:14 pm
    Post #3 - June 21st, 2005, 2:14 pm Post #3 - June 21st, 2005, 2:14 pm
    Lincoln Square (official northern boundary is 5600 north except for Rosehill Cemetary) seems to have an increasing number of Bulgarians. Harvest Time has been adding more Bulgarian foods (now carries 2 kinds of Bulgarian feta and it is hard to keep track of the increasing number of brands of ajvar from Bulgaria). One thing I have noticed is that Bulgarian businesses seem to come and go pretty quickly. I don't think Communism trained them very well in marketing.
  • Post #4 - June 21st, 2005, 6:48 pm
    Post #4 - June 21st, 2005, 6:48 pm Post #4 - June 21st, 2005, 6:48 pm
    The butcher shop on Lincoln north of Wilson (right south of the Mall, where Lincoln northbound traffic is directed to Western) today had both cevapcici (with a subtitle of Romanian mitetei (sp?) and next to it an identical looking sauasage with a name I cannot recall. When I inquired as to the difference, I was told the latter was a Bulgarian product, same meat mix but seasoned with cumin.

    This is a nice meat market, seems to be a young couple has taken it over. They make and smoke a variety of sausages, Canadian bacon, they have nice looking kassler ripchen and smoked spareribs.

    The cevapcici and the Bulgarian variant were packaged in trays, but I was told it was possible to purchase a half tray. As I did not need that much meat, I passed in favor of two house smoked Thuringer (not yet consumed).

    As a testimonial to the owners, when someone asked about the availability of a particular sausage, they were directed to Joe the Sausage King, as he at least used to make that sausage (didn't catch the name). Nice to see a merchant not try to push his own product on a customer that knows what he wants.

    On Saturdays, they make and sell both wiener and chicken schnitzel, for the older German clientele, I was told.
  • Post #5 - June 21st, 2005, 7:02 pm
    Post #5 - June 21st, 2005, 7:02 pm Post #5 - June 21st, 2005, 7:02 pm
    I believe this is the place you are describing.

    Lincoln Quality Meat Market, Inc.
    4661 North Lincoln Avenue
    Chicago, IL 60625
    773.561.4570
  • Post #6 - June 21st, 2005, 9:21 pm
    Post #6 - June 21st, 2005, 9:21 pm Post #6 - June 21st, 2005, 9:21 pm
    I bought a tray of the sausages with cumin recently from Lincoln Quality Market. They are quite lean, not garlicy (unlike their Romanian cevapcici) and are heavily seasoned with cumin. They are great grilled over charcoal provided you like cumin. I meant to write down the name but didn't. It starts with something similar to kebab. There seem to be some influences from the old Ottoman empire here.

    Drifting from topic, but Lincoln Market carries an inexpensive ($6/ lb. IIRC) Argentine parmesan cheese. It is a nice grating cheese but doesn't have the full nuttiness and roundness of flavor of a Parigiano Reggiano. It is a bargain compared to some of the Wisconsin granas of lower quality. It is still moist enough for eating by itself. Here is another sign of the effects of the many Italians who emigrated to Argentina.

    I have heard but can't verify that the new owner is Croatian. They are listed by the Lincoln Square Chamber of Commerce, which only lists members, but haven't cropped up as business of the month yet. Usually that happens pretty quickly, but Fine Wine Brokers didn't make it until April. So who knows?
  • Post #7 - June 22nd, 2005, 10:53 am
    Post #7 - June 22nd, 2005, 10:53 am Post #7 - June 22nd, 2005, 10:53 am
    ekreider wrote:Lincoln Market carries an inexpensive ($6/ lb. IIRC) Argentine parmesan cheese. It is a nice grating cheese but doesn't have the full nuttiness and roundness of flavor of a Parigiano Reggiano.


    To drift even more, stay away from the Argentine parmesan sold at Costco. It tastes exactly like plastic.
  • Post #8 - October 7th, 2006, 6:26 am
    Post #8 - October 7th, 2006, 6:26 am Post #8 - October 7th, 2006, 6:26 am
    Last night, while dining on charcoal-grilled mititei at Perla Restaurant, the Lincoln Market came up in conversation. Cathy1 remembered going there as a girl, and remarked on the many varieties of meat offered there. With a wistful tone, she waxed nostalgic:

    For us kids it was a wonderful place, with all the ducks and venison and rabbits. It was just like going to the zoo, except all the animals were dead!"
    Man : I can't understand how a poet like you can eat that stuff.
    T. S. Eliot: Ah, but you're not a poet.
  • Post #9 - October 7th, 2006, 9:45 am
    Post #9 - October 7th, 2006, 9:45 am Post #9 - October 7th, 2006, 9:45 am
    You may already be aware that many of these Bulgarian deli items can also be had off the menu at the oddly named Florida Restaurant (actually a Bulgarian cafe) 2201 W. Montrose (next to Apart Pizza Co.).

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