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Places to buy British foodstuffs in Chicago

Places to buy British foodstuffs in Chicago
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  • Places to buy British foodstuffs in Chicago

    Post #1 - April 27th, 2005, 10:14 am
    Post #1 - April 27th, 2005, 10:14 am Post #1 - April 27th, 2005, 10:14 am
    I grew up in dear old Blighty and still get the urge every now and then for items like Marmite, PG Tips etc, Golden Syrup etc. I would have thought that a city the size of chicago might have at least one British grocery store, but I don't know of one. I'm guessing there might be some on the South Side somewhere but I'm not sure where to look.

    Any ideas?
  • Post #2 - April 27th, 2005, 10:20 am
    Post #2 - April 27th, 2005, 10:20 am Post #2 - April 27th, 2005, 10:20 am
    Generally, the stores only exist when there's an immigrant community, and that's not the case with Britain... Ireland, on the other hand, is a different matter, and I'd bet you could find most of what you want in the Irish stores mentioned here.

    Golden Syrup is available at places like Whole Foods and Cost Plus. Actually, there's a lot of British stuff at Cost Plus, I'd try there too.
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  • Post #3 - April 27th, 2005, 10:22 am
    Post #3 - April 27th, 2005, 10:22 am Post #3 - April 27th, 2005, 10:22 am
    I'd also add Treasure Island (especially the one on Clyborn and Webster) to the list of places to look.
    Steve Z.

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  • Post #4 - April 27th, 2005, 10:29 am
    Post #4 - April 27th, 2005, 10:29 am Post #4 - April 27th, 2005, 10:29 am
    stevez wrote:I'd also add Treasure Island (especially the one on Clyborn and Webster) to the list of places to look.


    Let me second Stevez' suggestion here. The Streetville TI as well as the one on Clark also have, I believe, small British sections in the isle of imported stuff. They may well not carry the more obscure or exotic items at TI, but for what they do have, they offer the convenience of several locations around town.

    Antonius
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    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #5 - April 27th, 2005, 10:40 am
    Post #5 - April 27th, 2005, 10:40 am Post #5 - April 27th, 2005, 10:40 am
    Mike G wrote:Generally, the stores only exist when there's an immigrant community, and that's not the case with Britain... Ireland, on the other hand, is a different matter, and I'd bet you could find most of what you want in the Irish stores mentioned here.


    I thought this was likely to be the case. Happily, a lot of the stuff I am looking for should also be available at the Irish stores listed in this thread.

    Thanks to everyone for their sugestions, I will get shopping this weekend!
  • Post #6 - April 27th, 2005, 12:41 pm
    Post #6 - April 27th, 2005, 12:41 pm Post #6 - April 27th, 2005, 12:41 pm
    The Jewel on Ashland between Diversey and Belmont has a surprisingly good (small, however) British and Irish food section that has PG Tips, barley water, Carr's biscuits, HP sauce, Heinz baked beans, salad cream, Cadbury's Chocolates, etc. It's just opposite the meat counter.

    Other Jewels might have this, too, although I know for a fact that the one on Paulina/Milwaukee/Ashland does not...
  • Post #7 - January 24th, 2006, 1:02 pm
    Post #7 - January 24th, 2006, 1:02 pm Post #7 - January 24th, 2006, 1:02 pm
    Hi, I'm new here.

    My name is Maria and I stumbled across this forum in a google search. :) I love to eat, cook, bake and just moved back here from WV about a year ago.

    I live in Streamwood, but grew up in the North Shore of Chicagoland. More specifically Skokie/Lincolnwood, IL.

    Anyway, the reason for this post is that I am hosting an Afternoon Tea at my house this coming Sunday. I am trying to find a good British grocer or at least figure out where I can pick up good Clotted Cream and Double Devon Cream. I'm also going to make raisin scones. If anyone knows where I can get great raisin scones, that'd make the prep so much easier. But, I'm not adverse to baking scones from scratch. :)

    I also want to find a place to find inexpensive, but good quality teapots. They don't have to be fancy, just simple and solid colors would be cool.

    Hope people can help!

    Thanks and I hope to post often here,

    Akane
  • Post #8 - January 24th, 2006, 1:40 pm
    Post #8 - January 24th, 2006, 1:40 pm Post #8 - January 24th, 2006, 1:40 pm
    Akane, you might want to call British Accents, at 847-913-0855. They are in Long Grove, and I know they carry Devonshire Cream.
  • Post #9 - January 24th, 2006, 1:47 pm
    Post #9 - January 24th, 2006, 1:47 pm Post #9 - January 24th, 2006, 1:47 pm
    Hi,

    Recently, when I was at Woodman's in Wisconsin, they had maybe 4-5 feet wide and at least three shelves of british products.

    Galway Bakers is an Irish Bakery, which quite likely makes your scones. They don't have a formal retail store, you will need to order by phone and arrange picking up.

    My Great Aunt in New Zealand would make her own clotted cream. There are a number of recipes on the web, which is largely similar to making yogurt. You need milk and you need a culture. Whatever you make will likely be cheaper and taste fresher than what is offered commercially.

    Woodman's
    Kenosha, Wisconsin
    Take I-94 north, exit at Highway 50 turn east at very next stoplight turn left and it is on the northeast hill.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
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  • Post #10 - January 24th, 2006, 2:18 pm
    Post #10 - January 24th, 2006, 2:18 pm Post #10 - January 24th, 2006, 2:18 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:Hi,

    Recently, when I was at Woodman's in Wisconsin, they had maybe 4-5 feet wide and at least three shelves of british products.

    Galway Bakers is an Irish Bakery, which quite likely makes your scones. They don't have a formal retail store, you will need to order by phone and arrange picking up.

    My Great Aunt in New Zealand would make her own clotted cream. There are a number of recipes on the web, which is largely similar to making yogurt. You need milk and you need a culture. Whatever you make will likely be cheaper and taste fresher than what is offered commercially.

    Woodman's
    Kenosha, Wisconsin
    Take I-94 north, exit at Highway 50 turn east at very next stoplight turn left and it is on the northeast hill.

    Regards,


    Thanks to Cathy2 and sabersix for the suggestions on where to look. After seeing the older posts/replies, I think I may try to look at my local Jewels to see if they happen to carry anything like that. The one in Schaumburg on Barrington and West Irving Park Roads has a pretty good ethnic aisle. I'll also try Whole Foods and there IS a Woodman's in Algonquin I can also check out.
    Akane
    A goin' out type of foodie gal
  • Post #11 - January 24th, 2006, 3:20 pm
    Post #11 - January 24th, 2006, 3:20 pm Post #11 - January 24th, 2006, 3:20 pm
    Probably not what you need for the immediate purpose-- I have no idea if they carry Devon or clotted cream and kind of doubt it-- but the Sunset chain in the suburbs also has decent little selections of non-US food, including UK.
  • Post #12 - January 24th, 2006, 7:05 pm
    Post #12 - January 24th, 2006, 7:05 pm Post #12 - January 24th, 2006, 7:05 pm
    TI carries clotted cream, scones, etc.

    Actaully, Oakton Market has a fair number of English dry goods, like Ribena, Lucozade, teas, beans, canned soups, Flake, etc.
  • Post #13 - January 25th, 2006, 3:45 am
    Post #13 - January 25th, 2006, 3:45 am Post #13 - January 25th, 2006, 3:45 am
    Akane, if you live in Streamwood, you may find the Woodman's in Carpentersville handiest. They mostly seem to carry imported dry goods, though.

    Woodman's Food Market
    847/426-6758
    2100 Randall Road
    Carpentersville

    Here's another possibility:

    Gaelic Imports
    773/545-6515
    4736 N. Austin St.
    Chicago

    Also check this thread: http://www.lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.php?t=3228

    For teapots, try:

    Todd & Holland Tea Merchants
    708/488-1136
    www.Todd-Holland.com
    7577 Lake St.
    River Forest
  • Post #14 - January 25th, 2006, 2:09 pm
    Post #14 - January 25th, 2006, 2:09 pm Post #14 - January 25th, 2006, 2:09 pm
    LAZ wrote:Akane, if you live in Streamwood, you may find the Woodman's in Carpentersville handiest. They mostly seem to carry imported dry goods, though.

    Woodman's Food Market
    847/426-6758
    2100 Randall Road
    Carpentersville

    Here's another possibility:

    Gaelic Imports
    773/545-6515
    4736 N. Austin St.
    Chicago

    Also check this thread: http://www.lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.php?t=3228

    For teapots, try:

    Todd & Holland Tea Merchants
    708/488-1136
    www.Todd-Holland.com
    7577 Lake St.
    River Forest


    Thanks, LAZ for the heads-up on the tea shop. I'll definitely venture out there to see what kind of teapots they have. Also, thanks for the other recommendations as well. It is much appreciated! :D
    Akane
    A goin' out type of foodie gal
  • Post #15 - January 25th, 2006, 2:14 pm
    Post #15 - January 25th, 2006, 2:14 pm Post #15 - January 25th, 2006, 2:14 pm
    Note, Todd & Holland has moved:

    7311 West Madison Street
    Forest Park, IL 60130
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #16 - January 27th, 2006, 12:54 am
    Post #16 - January 27th, 2006, 12:54 am Post #16 - January 27th, 2006, 12:54 am
    Heya everyone!

    Just wanted to let people know that I appreciate the help, but it looks like my local Jewel carried both clotted cream and devon cream! :) I got 2 almost 6oz jars of clotted cream and 1 6oz jar of devon cream. :) It was in the Irish section of their ethnic aisle. So, yay, I'm happy. :)

    They also had lemon curd there as well and a few other dry goods. Gonna check out the Naperville Crate and Barrel Outlet to see what they have as far as any last minute tea party items. :)
    Akane
    A goin' out type of foodie gal
  • Post #17 - February 2nd, 2006, 10:53 am
    Post #17 - February 2nd, 2006, 10:53 am Post #17 - February 2nd, 2006, 10:53 am
    borismom wrote:TI carries clotted cream, scones, etc.

    Actaully, Oakton Market has a fair number of English dry goods, like Ribena, Lucozade, teas, beans, canned soups, Flake, etc.


    I'm pretty sure I've seen Marmite there as well - though I'd be hard pressed to say where in the store...
  • Post #18 - August 11th, 2006, 9:26 pm
    Post #18 - August 11th, 2006, 9:26 pm Post #18 - August 11th, 2006, 9:26 pm
    Costco used to carry Carr's Ginger Lemon Tea cookies. They are fantastic, and I am down to my last two and definitely feeling a need coming on. You can buy them on-line from Carr's on-line, but I suspect at a steeper price than at Costco. Anyone know of a more local source?
    Leek

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  • Post #19 - August 12th, 2006, 2:51 pm
    Post #19 - August 12th, 2006, 2:51 pm Post #19 - August 12th, 2006, 2:51 pm
    Out in the suburbs, chains such as Jewel and Sunset have a good number of things from the UK, certainly including some Carr's biscuits, but the selections tend to vary a lot. I have a mental checklist of imported items (HP Curry, anyone?)and stop into Sunsets and Treasure Islands frequently to see if they have them.
  • Post #20 - January 28th, 2013, 11:26 am
    Post #20 - January 28th, 2013, 11:26 am Post #20 - January 28th, 2013, 11:26 am
    I'm not sure where else to post this, so here goes.

    I have a giant book at home that was published in the UK and asks for some odd ingredients. Both recipes are for cake. One calls for chopped angelica. The only thing I can find online is that it is an herb similar to carrot greens?

    The other ingredient called for was 4 ounces of soft vanilla fudge. Is this an ingredient or are you supposed to make fudge and cut off a 4 ounce piece and beat it into the batter?
    I want to have a good body, but not as much as I want dessert. ~ Jason Love
    There is no pie in Nighthawks, which is why it's such a desolate image. ~ Happy Stomach
    In the world of apples, Pink Lady runs the whorehouse. ~ James Napoli

    Late-Nite Eats Database
  • Post #21 - January 28th, 2013, 11:37 am
    Post #21 - January 28th, 2013, 11:37 am Post #21 - January 28th, 2013, 11:37 am
    Horse Flour at The Irish Store

    I am fond of scones, so my ears perked when my daughter, Josanna, told me about an excellent scone she’d eaten. It was baked by Oak Parker Carolyn Williams, and Josie told me it was made with horse flour that Williams purchased at The Irish Shop.

    A few days later, I walked into The Irish Shop and asked owner Anne August if she had any “horse flour” in stock.

    “Horse flour,” said August. “There’s no such thing.”

    “Well,” I said, “my daughter had this wonderful scone the other day. She said it was made of horse flour…or did she mean ‘coarse’ flour?

    “Ah, yes,” said August, “we have coarse flour in back,” which is right where she took me.

    Odlum’s stoneground coarse wholemeal flour is a product of Dublin. Ireland. Meaghan August, daughter of Anne, mentioned that this flour, though it’s labeled “coarse,” is actually lighter than what we buy in the states. “You’d have to sift American flour to get it as light as this ‘coarse’ flour,” she told me.

    Using the Odlum’s, Josie made scones with Earl Grey tea and lavender, a very fine combination.

    Image

    I’m a major fan of scones, and before I eat them I usually like to let the scones get a little stale (and thus harder and somewhat more crisp).

    The Irish Shop
    100 N Oak Park Ave
    The People’s Republic of Oak Park
    708.445.1149
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #22 - January 28th, 2013, 11:44 am
    Post #22 - January 28th, 2013, 11:44 am Post #22 - January 28th, 2013, 11:44 am
    I have a giant book at home that was published in the UK and asks for some odd ingredients. Both recipes are for cake. One calls for chopped angelica. The only thing I can find online is that it is an herb similar to carrot greens?


    Without seeing the recipe, my guess is this is chopped candied angelica, which is the candied stem of an herblike plant like parsley, but the stems are much thicker, more like thin celery stalks
  • Post #23 - January 28th, 2013, 1:19 pm
    Post #23 - January 28th, 2013, 1:19 pm Post #23 - January 28th, 2013, 1:19 pm
    Pie Lady wrote:I'm not sure where else to post this, so here goes.

    I have a giant book at home that was published in the UK and asks for some odd ingredients. Both recipes are for cake. One calls for chopped angelica. The only thing I can find online is that it is an herb similar to carrot greens?

    The other ingredient called for was 4 ounces of soft vanilla fudge. Is this an ingredient or are you supposed to make fudge and cut off a 4 ounce piece and beat it into the batter?


    Apparently it's difficult to locate in the UK also:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink ... elica.html
  • Post #24 - January 28th, 2013, 1:37 pm
    Post #24 - January 28th, 2013, 1:37 pm Post #24 - January 28th, 2013, 1:37 pm
    You might also try calling Spencer's Jolly Posh Foods on Irving Park in the city: http://spencerfoods.com/

    Even if they don't carry it, maybe they can be of some assistance with possible substitutions.
  • Post #25 - January 28th, 2013, 1:42 pm
    Post #25 - January 28th, 2013, 1:42 pm Post #25 - January 28th, 2013, 1:42 pm
    David Hammond wrote:Horse Flour at The Irish Store

    I am fond of scones, so my ears perked when my daughter, Josanna, told me about an excellent scone she’d eaten. It was baked by Oak Parker Carolyn Williams, and Josie told me it was made with horse flour that Williams purchased at The Irish Shop.

    A few days later, I walked into The Irish Shop and asked owner Anne August if she had any “horse flour” in stock.

    “Horse flour,” said August. “There’s no such thing.”

    “Well,” I said, “my daughter had this wonderful scone the other day. She said it was made of horse flour…or did she mean ‘coarse’ flour?

    “Ah, yes,” said August, “we have coarse flour in back,” which is right where she took me.

    Odlum’s stoneground coarse wholemeal flour is a product of Dublin. Ireland. Meaghan August, daughter of Anne, mentioned that this flour, though it’s labeled “coarse,” is actually lighter than what we buy in the states. “You’d have to sift American flour to get it as light as this ‘coarse’ flour,” she told me.


    The Irish Shop has some fantastic frozen Irish brown bread, really dark and crumbly in a way the pubs around here don't get right. I understand it's delivered fresh periodically by an area (non-commercial, perhaps) baker and then frozen, but I've never been able to time a pickup with the dropoff. Hardly matters, since like your preference for scones, slightly aged is my preference for the stuff.
  • Post #26 - January 28th, 2013, 7:06 pm
    Post #26 - January 28th, 2013, 7:06 pm Post #26 - January 28th, 2013, 7:06 pm
    rickster wrote:
    I have a giant book at home that was published in the UK and asks for some odd ingredients. Both recipes are for cake. One calls for chopped angelica. The only thing I can find online is that it is an herb similar to carrot greens?


    Without seeing the recipe, my guess is this is chopped candied angelica, which is the candied stem of an herblike plant like parsley, but the stems are much thicker, more like thin celery stalks

    Yes, that's what it is. It used to be a common ingredient in fruit cakes, its use dates back to the days before candied citrus peels were easily available (candied angelica & cherry were a common combination). Elizabeth David has a recipe for how to make this if that's of interest, though obviously you need to grow the fresh angelica to candy.
  • Post #27 - January 29th, 2013, 10:47 am
    Post #27 - January 29th, 2013, 10:47 am Post #27 - January 29th, 2013, 10:47 am
    Does it taste like parsley? I'm not a fan of fruitcake, so it doesn't sound like an appealing combination.
    I want to have a good body, but not as much as I want dessert. ~ Jason Love
    There is no pie in Nighthawks, which is why it's such a desolate image. ~ Happy Stomach
    In the world of apples, Pink Lady runs the whorehouse. ~ James Napoli

    Late-Nite Eats Database
  • Post #28 - January 29th, 2013, 11:14 am
    Post #28 - January 29th, 2013, 11:14 am Post #28 - January 29th, 2013, 11:14 am
    Found a source:

    http://www.markethallfoods.com/products ... MgodIC4AXw
  • Post #29 - January 29th, 2013, 11:21 am
    Post #29 - January 29th, 2013, 11:21 am Post #29 - January 29th, 2013, 11:21 am
    $30 per pound! Holy cow. It does look like celery and green Life Savers had a baby.
    I want to have a good body, but not as much as I want dessert. ~ Jason Love
    There is no pie in Nighthawks, which is why it's such a desolate image. ~ Happy Stomach
    In the world of apples, Pink Lady runs the whorehouse. ~ James Napoli

    Late-Nite Eats Database
  • Post #30 - January 29th, 2013, 1:19 pm
    Post #30 - January 29th, 2013, 1:19 pm Post #30 - January 29th, 2013, 1:19 pm
    Pie Lady wrote:Does it taste like parsley? I'm not a fan of fruitcake, so it doesn't sound like an appealing combination.

    No, its a more aromatic herbal, sort of licorice/anise-like. The candied form is also used in cassata, & the stems to flavor gin & other liqueurs. (Our neighbours when I was growing up used to grow this, & send us a box of the candied pieces every Christmas, together with home made jams & rose hip syrup & what have you).

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