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  • New Chicago Kimchee

    Post #1 - April 8th, 2006, 6:46 am
    Post #1 - April 8th, 2006, 6:46 am Post #1 - April 8th, 2006, 6:46 am
    LTH,

    New Chicago Kimchee is a cool little, and I do mean little, store next to Chuy's Chicken on Lawrence. Mainly kimchee, but also a few panchan, I picked up two favorites tiny dried anchovies and dried squid threads in a spicy, with a undertone of sweet, red pepper glaze. (I have no idea on the Korean names)

    Also picked up a pint jar of Ssamjang, at least I think that's what it is. It's like a cross between Kochujang (Korean chili pepper paste) and Dwenjang (Korean soybean paste), except with a strong dried fish component. The lady behind the counter said it's often used as an ingredient in fish stews. The taste is very similar to the table sauce at the now defunct Lincoln Noodle House.

    Ssamjang (Not sure if this is the correct name)
    Image

    Dried squid panchang
    Image

    Image

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    New Chicago Kimchee
    3648 W Lawrence Ave
    Chicago, IL 60625
    773-583-4442
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #2 - April 23rd, 2006, 1:57 am
    Post #2 - April 23rd, 2006, 1:57 am Post #2 - April 23rd, 2006, 1:57 am
    I love New Chicago Kimchee's "Sun Kimchee" but you have to get it fresh. If it's marinated too long then the napa cabbage lacks the crunch. Their daikon kimchee is also really good. They used to carry spicy marinated raw crabs and these were sooooo delicious especially with a nice cold beer. I hadn't gone back for about a year to get these marinated crabs. On my last visit about a month ago, the gentleman behind the counter said they didn't make it anymore. :cry:
  • Post #3 - April 23rd, 2006, 6:38 am
    Post #3 - April 23rd, 2006, 6:38 am Post #3 - April 23rd, 2006, 6:38 am
    Peety wrote:I love New Chicago Kimchee's "Sun Kimchee" but you have to get it fresh. If it's marinated too long then the napa cabbage lacks the crunch. Their daikon kimchee is also really good. They used to carry spicy marinated raw crabs and these were sooooo delicious especially with a nice cold beer. I hadn't gone back for about a year to get these marinated crabs. On my last visit about a month ago, the gentleman behind the counter said they didn't make it anymore. :cry:


    You can find 'em at Chicago Food Corp pretty much everyday, if you're talking about the marinated tiny-bite sized crabs - or are you talking about marinated blue crab?
  • Post #4 - April 23rd, 2006, 10:55 am
    Post #4 - April 23rd, 2006, 10:55 am Post #4 - April 23rd, 2006, 10:55 am
    If you are looking for the marinated big blue crabs, you can always try making it yourself! I have tried this recipe before, and it is really good...

    Marinated Raw Blue Crab
  • Post #5 - April 26th, 2006, 9:00 am
    Post #5 - April 26th, 2006, 9:00 am Post #5 - April 26th, 2006, 9:00 am
    I'm talking about the marinated large blue crabs. I've tried Chicago Food Corp's marinated crabs and these just don't have that nice mix of flavors. Too spicy and not enough richness in flavor. But thanks for the info.

    Crazy C, This is awesome !! I knew I could probably marinate these myself. I just needed the correct ratio of ingredients. Thanks so much for the recipe. I'll try it out. YUM !
  • Post #6 - April 27th, 2006, 8:52 am
    Post #6 - April 27th, 2006, 8:52 am Post #6 - April 27th, 2006, 8:52 am
    Thinking about eating raw crab reminds me of that scene in Castaway (w/ Tom Hanks) where he first finds food by catching a small crab and attempts to eat it raw, only to see it come out as a wet gloopy slime... Having seen the recipe posted by CrazyC, I know understand why the Korean markets sell fresh prepped-and-cleaned blue crab "halves" whenever they're in season (also to highlight the presence of roe as well I think).
  • Post #7 - October 11th, 2006, 9:26 am
    Post #7 - October 11th, 2006, 9:26 am Post #7 - October 11th, 2006, 9:26 am
    LTH,

    I've developed quite a passion for New Chicago Kimchee's daikon radish kimchee, crunchy, fresh bright flavor, a step above what's available at Chicago Food Corp or H-Mart.

    Image

    As you might notice there are buns and dumplings in the photo as well. Seems that now that I'm a 'regular' the very nice lady who runs NCK let me on to the mandu and steam buns, all made in-house by her and her mother. We tried the pork and kimchee buns, my wife said it reminded her of a sauerkraut perogi, in a good way. Steam buns contain a cooked filling, the mandu contain, in addition to kimchee, raw pork.

    New Chicago Kimchee 'Steam Buns'
    Image
    Image

    Frankly, as good as the Steam Buns are, and I am sure the mandu will be terrific, that's not the best part. While I was there she brought out a blistering hot crisp pancake. I gave it a taste and was immediately transported to my grandmothers kitchen at Passover, Lakte, it tasted just like a latke (potato pancake).

    Yes, I realize it's not made from potato and contains kimchee, but hot from the pan that was the taste, and a damn good taste at that. She was quite clear that there was no potato involved, even to the extent of showing me the mung bean seeds the flour is milled from and seemed perplexed I liked the flavor to such a great degree, pleased, but perplexed. :) After a bit of consultation with m'th'su, who was recently in Korea, we ascertained the Korean latke is Bindaetteok.

    New Chicago Kimchee Co-Owner w/ Bindaetteok
    Image

    Still delicious, but not quite the same impact reheated in the microwave, but if one took the time to reheat in the oven for the crisp factor it'd be close.
    Image

    Here are a couple of bindaettoek pictures m'th'su took in Korea
    Pictures by m'th'su (Mike Sula)
    Image
    Image

    New Chicago Kimchee is a little jewel of a shop.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #8 - October 11th, 2006, 11:00 am
    Post #8 - October 11th, 2006, 11:00 am Post #8 - October 11th, 2006, 11:00 am
    Gary thanks for the write-up of new chicago kimchee - frankly i've been disappointed by the kimchee at both hmart and at chicago food corp - i prefer clark market or arirang to both of these. how does NCK compare to those places?

    what else does she have in addition to buns, nandu, kimchee, and the pancakes - does she stock those fish/seafood pancakes that a lot of the grocery stores do?
  • Post #9 - October 11th, 2006, 11:29 pm
    Post #9 - October 11th, 2006, 11:29 pm Post #9 - October 11th, 2006, 11:29 pm
    i second for the comparison of kimchee compared to clark market and h-mart.

    because of this great board, i hopped on the buzz train to the incredible ubershop h-mart. awesome place to go and thanks for the heads up. (i filled up my van with those lychee-coconut jello shot jars and chestnut popsicles. ^_^) however, i was rather unimpressed by their sliced cabbage kimchee in the small plastic jar. it's not bad, but it's lacking. lacking in salt... and something else i can't put my finger on... pungency?

    the cabbage kimchee i get from clark market i find a quite a bit tastier, although it's been quite a while since i've been down there.
  • Post #10 - October 13th, 2006, 7:08 am
    Post #10 - October 13th, 2006, 7:08 am Post #10 - October 13th, 2006, 7:08 am
    zim wrote:Gary thanks for the write-up of new chicago kimchee - frankly i've been disappointed by the kimchee at both hmart and at chicago food corp - i prefer clark market or arirang to both of these. how does NCK compare to those places?

    Zim,

    It was a shopping excursion at H-Mart, which included a fresh from the refrigerated case, but already sour with no life/snap/crunch left to the radish, daikon kimchee that reminded me I had not been to NCK in a while. The side by side difference was startling, a comparison might be Jewel eggs as opposed to Henry's Farm eggs from the Evanston Farmers Market. Far as Clark Market or Arirang it's been a while since I purchased kimchee from either, but for my taste it'd be tough to beat the fresh, clean flavored crunch of NCK product.

    NCK appears to do a brisk wholesale business, it's quite possible, especially given the proximity, that Clark or Arirang carry, among other producers, NCK's product, though unless I'm making Kimchee Chigae I'm a fresher is better kind of kimchee guy.


    zim wrote:what else does she have in addition to buns, nandu, kimchee, and the pancakes - does she stock those fish/seafood pancakes that a lot of the grocery stores do?

    There is a small variety of fresh made panchan, no sweet potato that I could see, nor have I seen pajeon or Korean style maki rolls (kimbap). Though there is no telling what gems she has available.

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    Chicago Food Corp
    3333 N Kimball Ave
    Chicago, IL
    773-478-5566

    Arirang Supermarket
    4017 W. Lawrence
    Chicago, IL

    Clark Market
    4855 N Kedzie Ave
    Chicago, IL 60625
    773-478-2262

    H-Mart
    801 Civic Center Dr
    Niles, IL 60714
    847-581-1212
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #11 - October 14th, 2006, 6:53 pm
    Post #11 - October 14th, 2006, 6:53 pm Post #11 - October 14th, 2006, 6:53 pm
    G Wiv wrote:for my taste it'd be tough to beat the fresh, clean flavored crunch of NCK product.

    I haven't had the kimchi from any of these places, but is a fresh clean flavor what one truly wants in a fermented product?

    I typically want my pickles to taste, well, pickled. Like, I'm often frustrated at how tough it is to find old-dill pickles in the Chicago area vs. new dills. (New Yorkers would likely call these "full sour" vs. "half sour" and they are designations that apply to kosher dills, pickled without vinegar.)
  • Post #12 - October 14th, 2006, 10:50 pm
    Post #12 - October 14th, 2006, 10:50 pm Post #12 - October 14th, 2006, 10:50 pm
    LAZ wrote:I haven't had the kimchi from any of these places, but is a fresh clean flavor what one truly wants in a fermented product?

    LAZ,

    It's what I want in a fermented vegetable product, nice crunch, clean fresh flavor, no over the top sour. I'm a new pickle fan, maybe verging onto half sour, crunch in the diakon radish kimchee fan, texture, crisp, bright flavor is where it's at for me. YMMV

    Reminds me of what you said re BBQ.
    LAZ wrote
    "Perhaps, when it comes to ribs, you and I belong to the same Orthodox tradition, but follow different rabbis."

    There's a simple fix if the kimchee flavor is too fresh for your taste, 1-2-3 weeks in the frig and Bob's yer Uncle.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #13 - October 15th, 2006, 1:47 pm
    Post #13 - October 15th, 2006, 1:47 pm Post #13 - October 15th, 2006, 1:47 pm
    Does anyone know what their hours are? I went by today (Sunday) and they were closed. I didn't see a sign with their hours, although since I didn't get out of the car, I could have missed it.

    Thanks!
    -gtgirl
  • Post #14 - October 16th, 2006, 6:16 pm
    Post #14 - October 16th, 2006, 6:16 pm Post #14 - October 16th, 2006, 6:16 pm
    Amongst Koreans there are typically two camps regarding fresh vs "rotten" kimchi lovers. I prefer fresher kimchees myself, but many of my friends like to toe the line between where it's just perfectly "pickled" versus ready to be thrown out along with the jar (not worth recycling at that point).
  • Post #15 - October 17th, 2006, 6:57 pm
    Post #15 - October 17th, 2006, 6:57 pm Post #15 - October 17th, 2006, 6:57 pm
    I, too, highly recommend NCK. On my first visit, I palmed a nice-looking jar of kimchee from the cooler. The proprietoress opened the jar, sniffed, frowned, shook her head, closed it and put it aside. After opening and sniffing a few other jars, she finally smiled and approved one for my purchase.

    The pork buns are porksome and savory and the bindaetteok scrumptuous. Today, upon her recommendation, I got these, seafoody, and delicious. Any idea what they are? I can't find them in my one and only Korean cookbook.

    Image

    Cheers,
    Wade
    "Remember the Alamo? I do, with the very last swallow."
  • Post #16 - October 18th, 2006, 5:14 am
    Post #16 - October 18th, 2006, 5:14 am Post #16 - October 18th, 2006, 5:14 am
    Hi Wade,

    I believe this is just simply pieces of any firm fleshed white fish just seasoned with salt, quickly dredged in flour, dipped in beated egg, and pan fried. It's called 'sengsun jun', or, pan fried fish. When golden and crispy, we eat it dipped in soy sauce, usually the seasoned soy that we use for dumplings as well.
    My grandmother makes it with orange roughy most of the time and it is one of my favorite things to eat when I visit the 'rents + grandma in the suburbs. I've seen it also made with flounder or halibut.
    Hope this helps

    Sharona
  • Post #17 - October 18th, 2006, 6:16 am
    Post #17 - October 18th, 2006, 6:16 am Post #17 - October 18th, 2006, 6:16 am
    waderoberts wrote:On my first visit, I palmed a nice-looking jar of kimchee from the cooler. The proprietoress opened the jar, sniffed, frowned, shook her head, closed it and put it aside. After opening and sniffing a few other jars, she finally smiled and approved one for my purchase.

    Was this (above) just another version of this (below)?
    G Wiv wrote:Had a quite nice, but initially annoying, lunch at LSC today. Initially annoying as our waitress was disinclined to let me order Sliced Beef and Maw Szechuan Style. First she told me I would not like it, then, when I persevered, she simply said no. I had to order/ask three times, maybe four, and finally, when she saw I was getting ticked off, acquiesced. Then, when I ordered Szechuan Spicy Rabbit w/bone, she 'bout passed a stone.

    I guess not, if only because you appreciated the guidance of the proprietoress. You, Wade, are no snooty-pants dilletante.
    Joe G.

    "Whatever may be wrong with the world, at least it has some good things to eat." -- Cowboy Jack Clement
  • Post #18 - October 18th, 2006, 7:21 am
    Post #18 - October 18th, 2006, 7:21 am Post #18 - October 18th, 2006, 7:21 am
    I think these were the exact opposite scenarios. In the LSC case, the waitress was trying to "protect" them from a dish that she assumed they wouldn't like.

    I have a feeling that in waderoberts case, the proprietess was looking for a properly cured jar of kimchee, wanting only to sell the best one.

    But, that's just my gut feeling.

    Best,
    Michael
  • Post #19 - October 18th, 2006, 7:33 am
    Post #19 - October 18th, 2006, 7:33 am Post #19 - October 18th, 2006, 7:33 am
    eatchicago wrote:I think these were the exact opposite scenarios. In the LSC case, the waitress was trying to "protect" them from a dish that she assumed they wouldn't like.

    I have a feeling that in waderoberts case, the proprietess was looking for a properly cured jar of kimchee, wanting only to sell the best one.


    Well, I definitely wouldn't be defending the LSC waitress. Even if these were the same, the NCK staffer had the correct style, and perhaps would not have contradicted the customer had Wade stuck his nose in there to indicate that he knew for his-own-damn-self what level of rottenness he preferred in his kimchee.

    My first reading was that they weren't the same as well, but having never been to NCK, I haven't got enough to judge by. Just thought it would be interesting to consider.
    Joe G.

    "Whatever may be wrong with the world, at least it has some good things to eat." -- Cowboy Jack Clement
  • Post #20 - October 18th, 2006, 7:39 am
    Post #20 - October 18th, 2006, 7:39 am Post #20 - October 18th, 2006, 7:39 am
    eatchicago wrote:I think these were the exact opposite scenarios.

    Michael,

    Exactly the opposite, good call.

    Not to belabor the point, but the lady at New Chicago Kimchee is one of the nicest people I've had the pleasure of meeting in ages. Sweet disposition, helpful, ready with cooking instructions, recipe and, always, a smile.

    The waitress at LSC, on the other hand, was treating me like an ex-husband 4-months behind on his alimony payments.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #21 - October 18th, 2006, 5:24 pm
    Post #21 - October 18th, 2006, 5:24 pm Post #21 - October 18th, 2006, 5:24 pm
    . . . but she obviously wanted to sell me the best that she had. That's pride, in the good sense of the word.

    Cheers,
    Wade
    "Remember the Alamo? I do, with the very last swallow."
  • Post #22 - March 3rd, 2012, 8:57 am
    Post #22 - March 3rd, 2012, 8:57 am Post #22 - March 3rd, 2012, 8:57 am
    Made my maiden voyage to NCK yesterday to stock up for a bo ssam extravaganza later today in celebration of my dad's 70th. What a great little place this is. We went to get kimchi, ssamjang and gochujang, but couldn't resist a little extraneous foraging. Those little dried anchovies! The black garlic! Wow. This stuff is impossible to resist. My dad couldn't believe where I was dragging him then couldn't believe his good luck as we tasted our way through their insanely delectable wares. (We went to Nhu Lan for lunch afterward - my dad is officially a fan.)

    Anyhow, the delightful woman behind the counter (who appears in one of GWiv's photos above) was eager for us to try something extra, and she gave me two... i guess I'd call them patties... of something she identified as chung gook jang. She said it made a great soup when combined with anchovy, onion, green onion, kimchee and tofu. Anyone ever tried this? She seemed very happy to be giving us these and I don't want to mess 'em up.
  • Post #23 - March 3rd, 2012, 12:30 pm
    Post #23 - March 3rd, 2012, 12:30 pm Post #23 - March 3rd, 2012, 12:30 pm
    Luckyguy wrote:Made my maiden voyage to NCK yesterday to stock up for a bo ssam extravaganza later today in celebration of my dad's 70th. What a great little place this is. We went to get kimchi, ssamjang and gochujang, but couldn't resist a little extraneous foraging. Those little dried anchovies! The black garlic! Wow. This stuff is impossible to resist. My dad couldn't believe where I was dragging him then couldn't believe his good luck as we tasted our way through their insanely delectable wares. (We went to Nhu Lan for lunch afterward - my dad is officially a fan.)

    Anyhow, the delightful woman behind the counter (who appears in one of GWiv's photos above) was eager for us to try something extra, and she gave me two... i guess I'd call them patties... of something she identified as chung gook jang. She said it made a great soup when combined with anchovy, onion, green onion, kimchee and tofu. Anyone ever tried this? She seemed very happy to be giving us these and I don't want to mess 'em up.


    Chunggookjang is the super pungent, highly fermented cousin of dengjang, which is Korean miso paste. More discussion of chunggookjang can be found here, along with a pic of the stew. Beware, it can be quite stinky!

    http://lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=26097&p=407252&hilit=Cho+Jung#p401599
  • Post #24 - March 4th, 2012, 8:50 am
    Post #24 - March 4th, 2012, 8:50 am Post #24 - March 4th, 2012, 8:50 am
    Thanks, Sharona! I did find something online that called it's dead-man soup, so it's probably not the thing to make for a date. I'll let you know how it turns out. Assuming I don't attract the attention of the coroner's office.
  • Post #25 - March 4th, 2012, 10:25 am
    Post #25 - March 4th, 2012, 10:25 am Post #25 - March 4th, 2012, 10:25 am
    I was hoping to stop by today to pick up kimchee for a stew I'm making later this week but can't determine from the posts above or anything online as to whether they're open on Sunday--I know I can call but I sometimes that isn't even a reliable option (and I'm sure they're not open yet in any case)--if anyone knows and can post here, that would be much appreciated.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #26 - March 4th, 2012, 5:12 pm
    Post #26 - March 4th, 2012, 5:12 pm Post #26 - March 4th, 2012, 5:12 pm
    G Wiv wrote:Still delicious, but not quite the same impact reheated in the microwave, but if one took the time to reheat in the oven for the crisp factor it'd be close.


    Don't use a microwave. Heat those up in a skillet on low to medium heat, flip a few times.
  • Post #27 - March 5th, 2012, 5:25 am
    Post #27 - March 5th, 2012, 5:25 am Post #27 - March 5th, 2012, 5:25 am
    So I decided to try my hand at a little chunggookjang last night using one of the patties given to me by the delightful women at NCK. I kind of freestyled it based on the ingredients she wrote down for me. Put a few anchovies, some white onion and some garlic in a little oil, let it get a little soft, then added a couple cups of water. Once it got going, I added the chunggookjang patty (which dissolved into its component parts quickly), some potatoes, kimchi and a few jalapeño slices. After that, I added green onion and some firm tofu. Wasn't nearly as pungent as advertised (no dead-man smell, unless my olfactory senses are failing me) and it wound up needing some salt despite the anchovies. But served over rice it was just the thing for a cold Sunday. I have no idea how faithful a rendition this is since I was working without a recipe, but I was pretty proud of myself and I have lunch for at least a couple days this week. Hopefully I won't incur the wrath of my co-workers when I break this stuff out. Thanks, New Chicago Kimchi.
  • Post #28 - March 5th, 2012, 9:20 am
    Post #28 - March 5th, 2012, 9:20 am Post #28 - March 5th, 2012, 9:20 am
    If your coworkers aren't Korean, there will be wrath.
  • Post #29 - June 12th, 2013, 1:04 am
    Post #29 - June 12th, 2013, 1:04 am Post #29 - June 12th, 2013, 1:04 am
    Does anyone know if New Chicago Kimchee has been closed down? I showed up the other day at about 3:40, the doors were locked, and the refrigerators inside were empty. The hours on the door state that it should be open until 4, closed sundays. I was there on monday.
    Part of the secret of a success in life is to eat what you like and let the food fight it out inside.

    -Mark Twain
  • Post #30 - June 12th, 2013, 7:02 am
    Post #30 - June 12th, 2013, 7:02 am Post #30 - June 12th, 2013, 7:02 am
    laikom wrote:Does anyone know if New Chicago Kimchee has been closed down? I showed up the other day at about 3:40, the doors were locked, and the refrigerators inside were empty. The hours on the door state that it should be open until 4, closed sundays. I was there on monday.
    I hope they are not closed, that would be a huge loss. Prices are rediciously low, quality high. For example, I've been buying pint jars of peeled black garlic at NCK for $20, that amount of black garlic at a gourmet specialty shop would be many multiple times more unpeeled.
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow

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