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Himalayan Restaurant - Niles
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  • Himalayan Restaurant - Niles

    Post #1 - January 3rd, 2006, 8:30 pm
    Post #1 - January 3rd, 2006, 8:30 pm Post #1 - January 3rd, 2006, 8:30 pm
    I work in Rosemont and I was thrilled when a co-worker told me that there was a very good Indian and Nepali restaurant not too far away in Niles -- Himalayan Restaurant. I have now been there three times in the last month, each time for the $7 lunch buffet, and each time I was very impressed with the quality and variety offered.

    On each visit, they have served fresh, hot naan, plain although we were given garlic upon request on one visit (I don't think there was an additional charge). The buffet offers a great variety of foods, both meat and vegetarian. Typically, there is salad, 2 appetizers, soup, 3-4 vegetarian dishes, 3-4 meat dishes (including chicken) and 2 desserts.

    At the salad station, you won't find much in the way of salad, but you'll find your traditional chutneys and dipping sauces. On each visit, one of the two appetizers was pakora and on one visit, one of the appetizers was chicken served in a wrap with a dipping sauce which I understand is Nepali. Today, they served some sort of slightly moist pancake (I can't recall everything in it (some vegetables), although I loved it).

    They also have one soup at the buffet, although I have not tried any of their soups. Of the meat items, there has always been one chicken dish with a curry-type sauce (I think Tikka Masala today), a goat dish (today on the bone w/ vegetables and spices -- Nepali), and on each visit a very good Tandoori chicken. Once, a decent lamb vindaloo.

    On each visit, there has also been one dish with paneer, as well as a few vegetarian choices -- on each visit, one dish with larger cut vegetables including potatoes. On each visit, there has also been a very good dish with lentil, today w/ onion, ginger, tomatoes and spices. On one visit, a fantastic chickpea dish, and today a dish of green beans in a coconut sauce which was tasty, albeit perhaps a tad too sweet. Of course, there's alsways basmati rice.

    On each visit, they have had the same two desserts: a pretty tasty gulab jamun (fried milk balls in syrup) as well as a pretty good version of kheer (rice pudding).

    On each visit, the food was very fresh (although I have arrived at noon or shortly before each time) and the service friendly and efficient. I would definitely recommend Himalayan Restaurant to anyone else working in the area.

    Himalayan Restaurant
    8265 Golf Road
    Niles (slightly Hidden in the Four Flaggs Shopping Center)
    847.324.4150
  • Post #2 - January 3rd, 2006, 8:35 pm
    Post #2 - January 3rd, 2006, 8:35 pm Post #2 - January 3rd, 2006, 8:35 pm
    I posted a little bit about this a long time back. I find myself up that way not infrequently and it has become one of my standard stops, including with the kids-- a nice, friendly place with some different choices on the buffet line, such as the green beans in the coconut sauce (which I have since seen on Devon, I forget where, but hadn't before).
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  • Post #3 - January 3rd, 2006, 8:56 pm
    Post #3 - January 3rd, 2006, 8:56 pm Post #3 - January 3rd, 2006, 8:56 pm
    I agree Mike that the variety is very refreshing. Unlike many buffets, I don't get the impression that the food is a concoction of leftovers, and it has been very fresh on each one of my visits.

    One other note: the restaurant is very clean -- I have noticed twice that when very young children arrive, they often have large paper portions placed under their chairs to protect against spilling. As a bystander, I thought this was very funny . . . just seemed a bit unusual.
  • Post #4 - January 3rd, 2006, 8:58 pm
    Post #4 - January 3rd, 2006, 8:58 pm Post #4 - January 3rd, 2006, 8:58 pm
    My kids probably taught them to do that!
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  • Post #5 - January 4th, 2006, 11:42 am
    Post #5 - January 4th, 2006, 11:42 am Post #5 - January 4th, 2006, 11:42 am
    I'll add my vote as well. Lovely Dining Companion and I occasionally find ourselves nostalgic for a Nepali fix. Although some Indian restaurants advertise themselves as having Nepali dishes, our experience is that the claim is more wishful than actual. Too many times we've found either a few token dishes or dishes virtually indistinguishable from Indian food. Even conceding that the distinction varies depending upon one's location in Nepal (or India), there are distinct Nepali dishes and Himalayan Restaurant offers some of them.

    On our first visit to the restaurant, I recall arguing with LDC about the location depicted in a painting on the wall. To settle the disagreement, we asked our waiter. Turned out he was from the town pictured (Pokhara, for the terminally curious). Since we had both visited it, we had a nice chat with him. As I recall (it's been a while), he said that the restaurant was run by a husband/wife team and that there were two chefs, one hired to do the Indian food and the Nepali wife (her husband is Indian) who handled those dishes.

    In any event, a very clean and pleasant place. We enjoy it each time we go. And for those curious about Nepali food, I'd recommend it.
    Gypsy Boy

    "I am not a glutton--I am an explorer of food." (Erma Bombeck)
  • Post #6 - January 4th, 2006, 12:29 pm
    Post #6 - January 4th, 2006, 12:29 pm Post #6 - January 4th, 2006, 12:29 pm
    Curious . . . what are the main differences between Indian and Nepali food? While I have enjoyed the food at Himalayan quite a bit, they have only offered a dish or two each time on the buffet that they say is Nepali -- and although very good, I have just not had enough to distinguish. I notice however that their menu has quite a few Nepali offerings.
  • Post #7 - January 4th, 2006, 1:01 pm
    Post #7 - January 4th, 2006, 1:01 pm Post #7 - January 4th, 2006, 1:01 pm
    BR wrote:Curious . . . what are the main differences between Indian and Nepali food? While I have enjoyed the food at Himalayan quite a bit, they have only offered a dish or two each time on the buffet that they say is Nepali -- and although very good, I have just not had enough to distinguish. I notice however that their menu has quite a few Nepali offerings.


    Check out "Mangoes and Curry Leaves," the new Alford/Duguid cookery book.
    Being gauche rocks, stun the bourgeoisie
  • Post #8 - January 4th, 2006, 5:21 pm
    Post #8 - January 4th, 2006, 5:21 pm Post #8 - January 4th, 2006, 5:21 pm
    Christopher Gordon wrote: Check out "Mangoes and Curry Leaves," the new Alford/Duguid cookery book.

    I've heard great things about that book. Doing my own research, I found an interesting explanation behind one significant difference between Indian and Nepali food in a restaurant review . . . the fact that Nepal is more mountainous:

    http://citypages.com/databank/22/1058/article9427.asp

    Slightly humorous but it certainly makes sense!
  • Post #9 - January 4th, 2006, 5:41 pm
    Post #9 - January 4th, 2006, 5:41 pm Post #9 - January 4th, 2006, 5:41 pm
    I received a copy of M&CL for Christmas. It's just as enthralling and comprehensive, though written for a popular audience, as Hot, Sour, Salty, Sweet. Too bad there isn't a concommitant pop appreciation for subcontinent food(similar to the environment that greeted the aforementioned).
    Being gauche rocks, stun the bourgeoisie
  • Post #10 - September 6th, 2006, 5:17 pm
    Post #10 - September 6th, 2006, 5:17 pm Post #10 - September 6th, 2006, 5:17 pm
    Image

    Liam's Favorite Nepali Restaurant

    I've made the joke about Himalayan being Liam's Favorite Nepali Restaurant enough times that now he repeats it without getting the joke. Anyway, it's one of my faves too, at least to the extent that, where I really won't go to a buffet on Devon any more, they seem kind of all the same and blah next to Khan BBQ, Hyderabad House etc., Himalayan in Niles is one of the few places that I'm happy to just sit and pick through whatever's in the trays today.

    I've said before that the old places on Devon need some shaking up in terms of menu, food quality, ambience, etc., but it seems like the real differences and innovations are popping up away from Devon-- of the ones I've tried, certainly India House downtown and Himalayan are each far more likely to surprise you with new dishes than any buffet place on Devon is at this point. One of the first things that attracted me at Himalayan was a dish of green beans cooked with coconut milk; mild in flavor, it's exactly the sort you might find cloying in a whole order, but on a buffet it makes a perfect contrast to the rest of the meal. They didn't have that today, but some other dishes they did have (along with the predictable-- but perfectly likable-- Chana Masala and Mutter Paneer):

    Image

    Yeah, I know these are the worst pictures in the history of LTHForum, the point is reading the little cards. Jaipuri Baigan Aloo was a bit heavy on big chunks of potato, but I admired that the eggplant hadn't been cooked down to mush.

    Image

    Bhuteko Cauli is not unlike a dish I've had many times at places like Indian Garden, but it seemed a little more fresh, a little more brightly spiced, and again, the vegetables weren't quite cooked to mush.

    Image

    This Nepali goat stew was the only thing to claim Nepali heritage the first time I ate here a couple of years ago; at the time it was fairly bland, and it seems to have been dialed up a bit, probably Indianized. Still, if less authentic it was damned good, tender goat and a richly flavorful sauce.

    One interestingly different, though not all that great, side thing I'd never seen before was ground lamb, deep fried inside a spring roll type wrapper. But even standbys are done well-- I wasn't impressed at first that the tandoori chicken was precooked and in a tray instead of coming to the table ablaze, but then I tasted it and I realized that for the first time, it actually tasted like it had been barbecued, it had a real smoky flavor that lifted it well out of the ordinary.

    Anyway, if life takes you anywhere near Golf & Milwaukee, as it does me whenever the kids need new Stride Rites or I need something at REI, Himalayan is well worth a stop for not only pretty good Indian (and Nepali) food for Niles, but pretty good Indian and Nepali food, period. Liam says so!

    Himalayan Restaurant
    8265 Golf Road
    Niles (slightly Hidden in the Four Flaggs Shopping Center)
    847.324.4150

    Image
    What people who didn't eat at Himalayan ate.
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  • Post #11 - September 6th, 2006, 9:21 pm
    Post #11 - September 6th, 2006, 9:21 pm Post #11 - September 6th, 2006, 9:21 pm
    Can anybody tell me if they served popped rice (shrpa Khaza) or the fab little dumplings with chicken, lamb or veggies (momo)?

    There is a Nepali restaurant in Farmington Hills, Michigan (http://www.everestexpressusa.com/) that I used to frequent when I lived nearby and I really miss these dishes.
  • Post #12 - September 6th, 2006, 9:22 pm
    Post #12 - September 6th, 2006, 9:22 pm Post #12 - September 6th, 2006, 9:22 pm
    Can't say I've seen either one on the buffet, but they have a full menu, which... I forgot to grab today.
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  • Post #13 - September 6th, 2006, 9:31 pm
    Post #13 - September 6th, 2006, 9:31 pm Post #13 - September 6th, 2006, 9:31 pm
    Hey, I was the other people. On the way back from Murray, KY to Lexington I stopped for gas in Leitchfield, KY and ended up with more than I expected. Chili Meltdown GrillBurger was actually just what the hangover doctor prescribed. Only complaint is that my wife went in to get the food and ordered me the 1/4 pound version instead of the the 1/2 pounder.

    Thomas

    P.S. There is no reason whatsoever to stop in Leitchfield, KY. unless you're about to run out of gas.
  • Post #14 - September 6th, 2006, 9:45 pm
    Post #14 - September 6th, 2006, 9:45 pm Post #14 - September 6th, 2006, 9:45 pm
    Mike G wrote:What people who didn't eat at Himalayan ate.

    Mike,

    Not exactly sure why, but the above, in conjunction with the picture, is cracking me. :)

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #15 - September 6th, 2006, 10:53 pm
    Post #15 - September 6th, 2006, 10:53 pm Post #15 - September 6th, 2006, 10:53 pm
    Thats a great pic - look at how that couple is walking!
  • Post #16 - September 6th, 2006, 11:45 pm
    Post #16 - September 6th, 2006, 11:45 pm Post #16 - September 6th, 2006, 11:45 pm
    Do they serve a dinner buffet as well?
  • Post #17 - September 7th, 2006, 7:17 am
    Post #17 - September 7th, 2006, 7:17 am Post #17 - September 7th, 2006, 7:17 am
    Panther in the Den wrote:Do they serve a dinner buffet as well?
    Nope, they don't. But their menu prices are reasonable.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #18 - September 7th, 2006, 10:06 am
    Post #18 - September 7th, 2006, 10:06 am Post #18 - September 7th, 2006, 10:06 am
    The buffet is served...

    11:30 to 2:30 M-F
    12:00 to 3:00 Weekends

    I think a weekend trip is in order. :)

    Thanks!
  • Post #19 - September 7th, 2006, 6:23 pm
    Post #19 - September 7th, 2006, 6:23 pm Post #19 - September 7th, 2006, 6:23 pm
    According to BR:
    Doing my own research, I found an interesting explanation behind one significant difference between Indian and Nepali food in a restaurant review . . . the fact that Nepal is more mountainous.


    BR linked to this quote from a Nepali restaurateur in St. Paul.

    In re-examining this thread about the well- and deservedly-liked Himalayan Restaurant in Niles, I see I am a bit remiss in answering a query about the distinction between Nepali and Indian. I want to ponder that a little before I say something not completely well-thought-out. However, for my money, the Nepali owner of the restaurant whose quote is the subject of the link, is full of bunk. Nepal is not a mountainous country. Parts of it, absolutely. Indeed, it's hard to think of Nepal and not think of mountains. But the southern third of the country, the portion called the terai is flat and most definitely not mountainous. It is indeed more jungle-like, heavily agricultural, and is a popular destination for safari-type expeditions. Even allowing for dramatic hyperbole and marketing savvy, the comment is far too glib. At least in my experience, that is not the difference between the cuisines.

    I talked at length with sazerac about this very subject once and some of my sense about the distinction is...but I digress. I will return anon and post some thoughts. But for now, I must sign off to conduct some more research.

    PS Tibet, apropos of the quote, is completely different. The country is virtually all desert and plateau, popular conception to the contrary. And the food. Goodness, gracious, great balls of tsampa, don't get me started. I once posted a long review of my experiences eating in Tibet. I would return in a heartbeat, but not for the food.
    Gypsy Boy

    "I am not a glutton--I am an explorer of food." (Erma Bombeck)
  • Post #20 - September 7th, 2006, 7:35 pm
    Post #20 - September 7th, 2006, 7:35 pm Post #20 - September 7th, 2006, 7:35 pm
    Mike G wrote:
    I've made the joke about Himalayan being Liam's Favorite Nepali Restaurant enough times that now he repeats it without getting the joke. Anyway, it's one of my faves too, at least to the extent that, where I really won't go to a buffet on Devon any more, they seem kind of all the same and blah next to Khan BBQ, Hyderabad House etc.,

    I've said before that the old places on Devon need some shaking up in terms of menu, food quality, ambience, etc., but it seems like the real differences and innovations are popping up away from Devon-- of the ones I've tried, certainly India House downtown and Himalayan are each far more likely to surprise you with new dishes than any buffet place on Devon is at this point.

    One of the first things that attracted me at Himalayan was a dish of green beans cooked


    Himalayan is a pretty nice place IMHO - been a couple of times, and never
    been particularly disappointed. I do think the "better or more innovative
    Indian restaurants away from Devon" thing is true, and iMHO has been
    for a while now (mentioned this somewhere on here 2 or 3 years ago
    once I think :-) Devon itself isnt doing as well anymore as it used to,
    business-wise, from what I hear - relatively fewer Indian folk are making
    the trek out to shop and/or eat, given the crowds, the awful parking
    issues etc. (This is why the Devon Indian-businessmen Association
    has been pushing to make Devon a bit like Chinatown, with a welcoming
    arch, a parking area etc with so far no response from the city... but thats
    a matter for a different thread :-)

    Anyway. There are now tons of good Indian restaurants in the burbs,
    and good-enough grocery shops too - enough so that people dont
    *need* to make the trek up to Devon anymore. There are Indian folk out in
    Schaumburg who basically never go up to Devon anymore - there
    are several Indian grocery stores in the Schaumburg area, as well
    as literally dozens of Indian restaurants (heck, the only 2 worthwhile
    "Indian-Chinese" restaurants in the entire Chicagoland area are both
    in Hoffman Estates :-) And the better of these (Bamboo Garden) is basically
    across the street from *two* chaat houses - Milan Chaat House (which
    also serves Indian beer IIRC), and "Hot Breads", which is a chain-bakery
    from Southern India. If you lived there, Iam not sure youd want (or need)
    to do the hour-long trek to Devon.

    As for buffets on Devon itself... I havent really been to many for a long
    long time now. Except one, which I went to a couple of weeks ago,
    and liked a fair bit. This was Daata Durbar (the "second" Daata Durbar,
    the one on the North Side of Devon Street, east of Western... the
    one that is a door down from King Sweets. The "older" Daata Durbar
    is across the street and down the road). This second Daata Durbar
    has buffets only for dinner, and only on Fridays, Saturdays and
    Sundays, for about 7 bucks. I liked it quite a bit the one time I went a
    couple of weeks ago, late on a weekend night (though, to be fair,
    I was very very hungry - and that may well have had something to
    do with it). Basically Daata Durbar (like Hyderabad House et al) makes
    about 6-7 dishes every day... on the weekends they now just make em
    and put em all out in a buffet instead of on the ala-carte menu, starting
    from about 6pm. Usually 1 or 2 lamb dishes, 1 or 2 chicken dishes,
    there was a shimp-manchurian or something when I was there, a
    plain rice and a chicken biryani, about 2 vegetarian dishes... thats
    about it. I dont recall a tandoori chicken, I do recall them making
    rotis and bringing me out a couple to my table. Just a much more
    unpretentious (and IMHO much less bland) buffet than you get
    at other spots on Devon, in a less-refined atmosphere (Daata Durbar
    used to be a cabbie joint, the old one still is, this one with a different
    owner is more a "family restaurant", but one that doesnt put on
    airs)... all of which is fine by me. I didnt try the veggie items, a
    couple of the meat items were good, one was very good, the rotis
    were freshly made... for about 7 bucks it was a very nice meal
    that I enjoyed (again, maybe because I was very very hungry
    that day - but enjoy it I did). On a weekend evening, worth
    checking out if in the area, I think.


    c8w
  • Post #21 - September 11th, 2006, 10:37 pm
    Post #21 - September 11th, 2006, 10:37 pm Post #21 - September 11th, 2006, 10:37 pm
    The Wife and I stopped by tonight, and walking in the door, decided to focus on Nepalese food, which I'm not sure I've ever had before.

    Of the appetizers, I liked the chicken momo (Nepal’s answer to dim sum) quite a lot, and they were served with what I believe is a traditional accompaniment: tomato-garlic dipping sauce.

    The chicken wings (!) were interstellar, tongue-bogglingly delicious, served sizzling and buttery on a platter of herbed white onions, fajitas-style (is that the way they serve food in Nepal? I heard many sizzling platters go by).

    We had a few things for dinner, but one of the standouts was simply spinach in a buttery (again) sauce with very simple ingredients (onion, garlic, ginger), tangy on rice with goat meat. (The rice here is perfect; each grain lightly separated).

    Servers were extremely nice and responded eagerly and informatively when queried about Nepalese chow.

    This is a very fine little place, and actually doing a decent business on a Monday night, which was surprising in that the mall they’re in seems to be in death throes (many “for rent” signs in windows, etc.).

    Another reason to go to Himalayan Restaurant: Super H Mart is about three miles away (I think I said “Wow” about 132 times from the time I walked in that place until I left half-an-hour later).

    Hammond
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #22 - September 11th, 2006, 11:10 pm
    Post #22 - September 11th, 2006, 11:10 pm Post #22 - September 11th, 2006, 11:10 pm
    David Hammond wrote:Super H Mart is about three miles away (I think I said “Wow” about 132 times from the time I walked in that place until I left half-an-hour later).

    Hammond,

    132 wows sounds about right, though a 1/2-hour is barely scratching the surface.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #23 - September 11th, 2006, 11:15 pm
    Post #23 - September 11th, 2006, 11:15 pm Post #23 - September 11th, 2006, 11:15 pm
    G Wiv wrote:
    David Hammond wrote:Super H Mart is about three miles away (I think I said “Wow” about 132 times from the time I walked in that place until I left half-an-hour later).

    Hammond,

    132 wows sounds about right, though a 1/2-hour is barely scratching the surface.

    Enjoy,
    Gary


    Yes, I could have stayed longer but The Wife was getting antsy.

    Walking in, we picked up some raspberries for 50 cents a carton -- them's Maxwell Street Market prices. Also picked up some very interesting looking Ya Pears, white flesh peaches and figs, all at surprisingly good prices.

    Could not believe the fish section (and the ones I saw looked fresh :wink: )

    Hammond
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #24 - September 21st, 2009, 4:20 pm
    Post #24 - September 21st, 2009, 4:20 pm Post #24 - September 21st, 2009, 4:20 pm
    Apparently there's another location in Bloomingdale... don't know if it's new or old. But it's right by my cousin's place and she's interested. Anybody been?
    Dominic Armato
    Dining Critic
    The Arizona Republic and azcentral.com
  • Post #25 - July 2nd, 2011, 11:31 am
    Post #25 - July 2nd, 2011, 11:31 am Post #25 - July 2nd, 2011, 11:31 am
    David Hammond wrote:Of the appetizers, I liked the chicken momo (Nepal’s answer to dim sum) quite a lot, and they were served with what I believe is a traditional accompaniment: tomato-garlic dipping sauce.


    I was there recently, I now know what a Chicken Momo looks like:

    Image
    Chicken Momo by cal222, on Flickr

    While they look like Chinese or Korean or Filippino dumplings, these were uniquely flavored. I cannot imagine they bought these premade frozen, because there just cannot be that large a market. Especially when I checked Momo recipes to find so many spices. I will be surprised if they don't make these themselves.

    I didn't bother with the sauce, I enjoyed these dumplings well enough as is.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
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  • Post #26 - July 2nd, 2011, 1:49 pm
    Post #26 - July 2nd, 2011, 1:49 pm Post #26 - July 2nd, 2011, 1:49 pm
    I have not had the chicken momo but have had lunch (both buffet and carry-out) from Himalayan a few times over the past 6 weeks. I find it to be very up and down. Some days, the food is fiery and really quite wonderful. Other times, it's bland and average, and the place feels like an entirely different restaurant. As one might expect, the offerings on the buffet are fairly typical, and they do change from day to day. Hot, ghee-drizzled naan is served at the table when you have the buffet.

    Last time out, the chicken makhani on the buffet was more like sauce makhani, with a few scant bits of chicken tossed in there. Normally, I'd just use that sauce on some tandori chicken but the tandori chafer on the buffet was empty and not being refilled expeditiously. OTOH, a brown sauce, braised goat dish was fantastic, as was the chana masala.

    Next time, I'm ordering the chicken momo, even if we do the buffet.

    =R=
    Gardening is a bloodsport --Meghan Kleeman

    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

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  • Post #27 - January 29th, 2012, 7:39 am
    Post #27 - January 29th, 2012, 7:39 am Post #27 - January 29th, 2012, 7:39 am
    We dined here for the first time last night and really enjoyed the experience. The vibe was very familial - friendly, attentive staff serving lots of multi-generational families plus couples out on "date night."

    We started with good versions of samosa and pakora appetizers. I had the Palak Paneer and Jonathan went with the Lamb Curry. We both opted to go with their recommended "medium" spice level. I think I could have gone with "hot," but needed to establish what their baseline was. Next time.

    Complimentary papadums w/ chutneys, 1 cocktail, 1 beer, 2 non-alcoholic drinks, 2 appetizers, 2 entrees (both w/ rice and Naan,) came to $60. My request for a sub of Roti for the Naan was happily honored. Portions were generous - I have leftovers for lunch today. We thought it was a good value, especially as we enjoyed the atmosphere & service.

    BTW - the place was packed! We got there around 7:30 and had a 30 minute wait. They were also doing a brisk carry-out business.
  • Post #28 - January 29th, 2012, 10:00 am
    Post #28 - January 29th, 2012, 10:00 am Post #28 - January 29th, 2012, 10:00 am
    I am glad to see this place prosper. Just before their grand opening, I was at the DMV next door. I was outside for some air while waiting for my number to be called. The door to Himalaya was open, so I went in to ask for a menu. The people were really sweet to me. They had some food cooking and insisted I have a sample. I actually have never been back there (shame on me). Since the Farmer's Best (across the street) and the Sun View markets closed, and I cut down on my beer consumption (and trips to the Liquor Barn), I don't get up to the Golf-Mil intersection much anymore.
  • Post #29 - June 17th, 2013, 10:05 pm
    Post #29 - June 17th, 2013, 10:05 pm Post #29 - June 17th, 2013, 10:05 pm
    It has been a while since anyone posted about Himalayan, so I thought I'd note that it's still alive and well. I hadn't been there in a couple of years when a Groupon for them popped up. (Always mixed emotions, those Groupons -- like the discount, but they always make me worry that maybe a restaurant is struggling.)

    With the Groupon, we went pretty much all Nepali. Had the wonderful chicken momos to start (served with a wonderful pepper sauce), and then had the two non-vegetarian dishes listed under Nepali specialties: Kukhura ko masu (chicken cooked in typical Nepali village style, with local herbs and spices) and Khasi ko masu (goat meat with bone, cooked in nepali village style, with local herbs and spices). Both were flavorful and interesting, though I liked the goat a bit better of the two. We asked for medium spice, and it was appropriately spiced -- zippy but not blistering.

    For dessert, my friend and I shared a "special" for the evening: falooda -- a lovely, milky drink with rose water and an odd assortment of additions, including takmaria, which when I looked it up I learned was seeds from holy basil. Kind of a chia seed effect, with the gel surrounding the germ. Sweet, cold, refreshing, and interesting.

    Service was friendly and efficient.

    Liked it well enough to go back two weeks later. Ordered the momos as soon as we walked in, since they are made fresh and take a few minutes to arrive.

    Curious to sample their Indian food, and not just the Nepali, we went for non-vegetarian thali #1: naan, basmati rice, mutter paneer, lamb curry, tandoori chicken, boti kabab, chicken tikka -- serves 2, $28.95. The boti kabab (bonelss cubes of lamb prepared tandoori style) was my favorite, but the whole meal was very good -- and good value.

    Having noted Mike G's comments on the buffet suggests that this should be my next visit.

    If I'm right and the Groupon hints at declining income, I hope a few folks in the area will pop in and help keep them afloat. Especially since I haven't seen any other momos this far out in the suburbs, and I quite fancy them.
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

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  • Post #30 - June 17th, 2013, 10:14 pm
    Post #30 - June 17th, 2013, 10:14 pm Post #30 - June 17th, 2013, 10:14 pm
    Cynthia wrote:If I'm right and the Groupon hints at declining income, I hope a few folks in the area will pop in and help keep them afloat.

    I don't think this is the case at all. Granted, I'm usually there at lunch time on weekdays but at that time, business is typically busy, with about 75% of the tables filled. 4-6 of us have lunch there a couple of times a month.

    I find the lunch buffet to be a mixed bag. Some days it's just awesome, some days it's unexciting and some days it's somewhere in between. It really depends on what's on the buffet on any given day. But it's never bad. That said, the only time we've ever ordered from the menu (and not had buffet) is for carry-out, which I think is consistently very good. I'm guessing that menu dishes ordered in the restaurant may be the best way to go but for weekday lunch, the buffet is quick, inexpensive and satisfies a variety of dietary preferences.

    =R=
    Gardening is a bloodsport --Meghan Kleeman

    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain

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