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Double Li - Szechuan cuisine across from LTH [closed]

Double Li - Szechuan cuisine across from LTH [closed]
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  • Double Li - Szechuan cuisine across from LTH [closed]

    Post #1 - September 8th, 2007, 12:13 am
    Post #1 - September 8th, 2007, 12:13 am Post #1 - September 8th, 2007, 12:13 am
    Our friends, one of whom is native Chinese, had been talking about this place for some time and promising to bring us there. They'd discovered it -- by luck -- after being bummed out by a long line at Lao Sze Chuan. Since then, they'd returned there numerous times and really fell in love with it. So, a couple of days ago, after some planning and replanning, we all finally made it to Double Li (not easy coming from Deerfield on a weeknight). It was an experience I will not soon forget; one of those meals that, for me, changed the known landscape of what Chinese cuisine can be.

    I'm not sure what we ate in some cases. Some items seem to match up with renditions described on the menu, others are close but not exact matches, and still some others seem to have been completely "off" menu. In this regard, it was great being hosted by our Chinese-speaking friend, who was able to navigate the menu, communicate with the staff and explain exactly what we wanted. And since the specials were hand-written in Chinese, her fluency paid off in that regard as well.

    Image
    Double Li is located at 228 W. Cermak


    Image
    Lamb
    This first dish was a complete surprise to me and a fine indication of the meal we were about to experience. Here, the thinly-sliced, seared lamb was redolent of aromatic cumin that wafted up from the table and completely engaged us. Our host informed us that cumin is very popular in western China, something I did not know and had never experienced before in eating Chinese food.


    Image
    Twice-cooked pork
    I'm not sure what to say about this dish other than that it was delicious and contained quite a bit of pork belly. Again, the baseline spiciness of this dish was fairly high, with some mildly sweet notes balancing it out nicely.


    Image
    Dry Chili Chicken
    I've had this dish at Lao Sze Chuan numerous times and this rendition stacks up against it quite favorably . . . fiery, crunchy, amazing. One of our friends compared eating this dish to finishing off a tube of toothpaste -- there's always one more chicken nugget hiding somewhere on the plate.


    Image
    Tofu (unsure of preparation)
    This soft and silky tofu really challenged my chopstick skills. It was sweet, rich, spicy and wonderfully timed within the meal. It showed up very well against the heat of the dry chili chicken and also added to the progression of heat in its own way.


    Image
    Fish in chili broth/oil
    This pot of fish was breathtakingly spectacular. Here, 5-spice, szechuan peppercorn and chilis provided most of the deep seasoning. I'd never before had Szechuan peppercorns tingle and numb my palate so quickly. The lightly battered fish was fried and then drowned in the hot pot. The result was some delectably tender pieces of flesh that were intensely flavorful. The cabbage in this bowl, which was saturated with the amazing broth, was worth fighting over. Dayum!


    Image
    Peapod greens
    I loved these tender greens. They were coated with a bright, snappy sauce which complemented the greens and offset their bitterness perfectly.


    Image
    Bearpaw tofu
    This dish was yet another eye-opener. Here, tofu is mixed with finely-ground chicken and egg to produce the 'bearpaws' which are then cooked in the relatively mellow sauce. These patties were soft, silky and delicious. They almost tasted like very rich omelettes.


    Image
    Fresh Frog Legs
    These fresh frog legs and their accompanying spicy sauce were tender and tasty. The dish reminded us of some Cantonese-style dishes but still packed quite a kick, heat-wise. This was a special that our friend happened to see posted on the wall. I'm thrilled we got to try it. I will say that the tiny froglegs were a bit of a challenge to eat in that separating the meat from the tiny bones was tedious work.


    Image
    Black Pepper Garlic Beef Tenderloin
    For whatever reason, the owner provided this dish to us 'on the house' and it was a great final round. The tasty nuggets of tenderloin were coated in a rub of salt, black pepper, sugar and garlic then cooked in some magical way. I'm honestly not sure if they were fried or braised and seared or cooked in some other manner. The owner made of a point of informing us that many Szechuan cooks don't know how to make this dish, so I figured that asking questions was futile. Even after all the other courses we enjoyed, this one was just about impossible to resist. It managed to blast through with flavor even though our palates were pretty taxed by this point in the meal. A great finale.

    What a joy this meal was. I loved just about every bite of it. It was filled with dishes, preparations and a variety of elements that pleased and surprised us throughout. Our host told us that in her experience, these dishes were prepared as authentically as any she'd ever had outside of China and that's one of the reasons why she's become so taken with Double Li. I cannot speak to that aspect but I will say that I've been craving and constantly thinking about what I ate there for the past 48 hours and I cannot wait to go back.

    =R=

    Double Li
    228 W. Cermak
    Chicago, IL
    312 842-7818
    If I asked my customers what they wanted, they would have said faster horses --Henry Ford

    Without wood, barbecue wouldn’t be barbecue -- Aaron Franklin

    Freedom demands that those in power allow others to think for themselves.

    I just wanna live until I gotta die. I know I ain't perfect but God knows I try --Todd Snider
  • Post #2 - September 8th, 2007, 12:17 am
    Post #2 - September 8th, 2007, 12:17 am Post #2 - September 8th, 2007, 12:17 am
    Thanks for the post. I'll be there this weekend!! Many of the above dishes are available at Lao Szechuan so the comparison should be interesting. Others, like the bear paw tofu and the beef dish, woulkd be new to me too. It's really good to hear of an intriguing new spot on Cermak. That stretch of our little Chinatown, like Wentworth itself, has been pretty dreary for years.
    Last edited by kuhdo on September 8th, 2007, 12:50 am, edited 1 time in total.
    Lacking fins or tail
    The Gefilte fish
    swims with great difficulty.

    Jewish haiku.
  • Post #3 - September 8th, 2007, 12:48 am
    Post #3 - September 8th, 2007, 12:48 am Post #3 - September 8th, 2007, 12:48 am
    This looks and sounds delicious. Thanks for the recommendation!
  • Post #4 - September 8th, 2007, 1:00 am
    Post #4 - September 8th, 2007, 1:00 am Post #4 - September 8th, 2007, 1:00 am
    Looks pretty good. BTW, both LSC and Ed's do great lambs with cumin.
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #5 - September 8th, 2007, 1:16 am
    Post #5 - September 8th, 2007, 1:16 am Post #5 - September 8th, 2007, 1:16 am
    I have actually had a few meals there with Mike. There is a dish called "Foo Zhi Fei Pian" and it is a cold appetizer of tripe. They make it very well there. Better than LSC in my opinion. The water boiled fish is also very good, I agree.
  • Post #6 - September 8th, 2007, 8:41 am
    Post #6 - September 8th, 2007, 8:41 am Post #6 - September 8th, 2007, 8:41 am
    Beautiful pictures and descriptions that will make me try this place quickly. The black pepper garlic beef and the fish hot pot sound particularly good, and who's not a fan of pork belly.

    On a side note, I had such a disappointing dim sum experience at Phoenix last weekend -- bland sticky rice in lotus leaf and overall, the dishes had obviously been sitting around too long in the carts . . . should have stuck with Shui Wah.
  • Post #7 - September 8th, 2007, 8:49 am
    Post #7 - September 8th, 2007, 8:49 am Post #7 - September 8th, 2007, 8:49 am
    Is this the old Sky Food location?
  • Post #8 - September 8th, 2007, 10:54 am
    Post #8 - September 8th, 2007, 10:54 am Post #8 - September 8th, 2007, 10:54 am
    Amata wrote:Is this the old Sky Food location?


    Yep
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #9 - September 8th, 2007, 3:26 pm
    Post #9 - September 8th, 2007, 3:26 pm Post #9 - September 8th, 2007, 3:26 pm
    Longtime lurker here, saying hi to everyone.

    The acclaim among my Chinese-born friends is that this place ("Chongqing Lou" if you ask a Chinese speaker) is the new Lao Sze Chuan (LSC being a little bit "commercialized" at this point due to its success with a mainstream American crowd).

    I was there in late June, and it does remind me of Lao Sze Chuan in its young, hungry days, in a previous incarnation called "Chuan Ba Wang". I expect that it has improved in quality at this point in its development, and I look forward to trying it again ... maybe tonight.
  • Post #10 - September 8th, 2007, 6:55 pm
    Post #10 - September 8th, 2007, 6:55 pm Post #10 - September 8th, 2007, 6:55 pm
    TGD: Welcome to LTH! I love your username.

    Great information, too. I'm looking forward to sullying Chongqing Lou with my mainstream American presence ;)
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #11 - September 10th, 2007, 11:25 am
    Post #11 - September 10th, 2007, 11:25 am Post #11 - September 10th, 2007, 11:25 am
    The Great Danton wrote:I was there in late June, and it does remind me of Lao Sze Chuan in its young, hungry days, in a previous incarnation called "Chuan Ba Wang".

    LTH,

    Between TGD's quote above and Ronnie S's gastroporn pics I simply can't resist a visit to Double Li this evening, Monday Sept 10th @ 7:30pm

    All are welcome, the more the merrier.

    I've posted in the Events Board as well.

    Double Li is BYOB

    9/10/07 @ 7:30pm
    Double Li
    228 W. Cermak
    Chicago, IL
    312 842-7818
    BYOB
    Sauce on the side, always, implied, axiomatic..........never a doubt, BBQ sauce without.

    Low & Slow
  • Post #12 - September 10th, 2007, 12:25 pm
    Post #12 - September 10th, 2007, 12:25 pm Post #12 - September 10th, 2007, 12:25 pm
    Ron
    Thanx for coming down and giving Double Li a try. Although I must admit that the overall quality of the food and preparation that evening was a little off.

    If I can add to some of Ron's wonderful comments...

    ronnie_suburban wrote:Image
    Twice-cooked pork
    I'm not sure what to say about this dish other than that it was delicious and contained quite a bit of pork belly. Again, the baseline spiciness of this dish was fairly high, with some mildly sweet notes balancing it out nicely.

    The Twice-cooked pork is first boiled in water then fried in a wok. If you have problems ordering this in English, try "twice porked."

    ronnie_suburban wrote:Image
    Dry Chili Chicken
    I've had this dish at Lao Sze Chuan numerous times and this rendition stacks up against it quite favorably . . . fiery, crunchy, amazing. One of our friends compared eating this dish to finishing off a tube of toothpaste -- there's always one more chicken nugget hiding somewhere on the plate.

    The Dry Chili Chicken that evening was a little light on the peppers and the spice. Now one might question that statement, upon seeing the abundance of peppers already on the plate, but from previous dining experiences there, they had cut back on the peppers and the spice about 20%. And I found the crunchy-ness to be "not so." Although a little different, IMHO, this is so much better than Lao.

    ronnie_suburban wrote:Image
    Tofu (unsure of preparation)
    This soft and silky tofu really challenged my chopstick skills. It was sweet, rich, spicy and wonderfully timed within the meal. It showed up very well against the heat of the dry chili chicken and also added to the progression of heat in its own way.

    This is Mapo tofu in its traditional preparation of ground pork, green onions, firm tofu, and spicy bean paste. First time I had this dish here, I was perspiring like I ran a marathon in 100 degrees with high humidity. This preparation was off that mark.

    ronnie_suburban wrote:Image
    Fish in chili broth/oil
    This pot of fish was breathtakingly spectacular. Here, 5-spice, szechuan peppercorn and chilis provided most of the deep seasoning. I'd never before had Szechuan peppercorns tingle and numb my palate so quickly. The lightly battered fish was fried and then drowned in the hot pot. The result was some delectably tender pieces of flesh that were intensely flavorful. The cabbage in this bowl, which was saturated with the amazing broth, was worth fighting over. Dayum!

    Tasty indeed. Be careful when ordering this, there are a couple of dishes that has fish swimming in oil, all prepared differently. FYI, you can also get this with meat instead of fish (but trust me, the fish is best).

    ronnie_suburban wrote:What a joy this meal was. I loved just about every bite of it. It was filled with dishes, preparations and a variety of elements that pleased and surprised us throughout. Our host told us that in her experience, these dishes were prepared as authentically as any she'd ever had outside of China and that's one of the reasons why she's become so taken with Double Li. I cannot speak to that aspect but I will say that I've been craving and constantly thinking about what I ate there for the past 48 hours and I cannot wait to go back.

    From what I have been told (by those that have had both), dishes prepared in Sichuan are at a much higher spice level than most of the preparations here in the Midwest (and possibly everywhere else outside of China), even though the restaurant is owned and operated by a Sichuanese. Also, I would not think the reason the spice level was off par, was because of our western crowd. I think it might have something to do with an off night (the first one I have ever encountered in the many times that we have gone).
  • Post #13 - September 10th, 2007, 12:32 pm
    Post #13 - September 10th, 2007, 12:32 pm Post #13 - September 10th, 2007, 12:32 pm
    yellow truffle wrote:If I can add to some of Ron's wonderful comments...


    This post is making me even more excited to try Double Li tonight!
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #14 - September 10th, 2007, 1:03 pm
    Post #14 - September 10th, 2007, 1:03 pm Post #14 - September 10th, 2007, 1:03 pm
    yellow truffle,

    If that was an "off" night, I can hardly wait to return on an "on" night. A great meal that was.

    =R=
    If I asked my customers what they wanted, they would have said faster horses --Henry Ford

    Without wood, barbecue wouldn’t be barbecue -- Aaron Franklin

    Freedom demands that those in power allow others to think for themselves.

    I just wanna live until I gotta die. I know I ain't perfect but God knows I try --Todd Snider
  • Post #15 - September 10th, 2007, 2:36 pm
    Post #15 - September 10th, 2007, 2:36 pm Post #15 - September 10th, 2007, 2:36 pm
    This may not be the right place to ask, but can anyone give a brief definition of what differentiates Cantonese, Szechuan, and Mandarin cooking as well as some places in Chinatown for each of those cuisines?
  • Post #16 - September 10th, 2007, 2:42 pm
    Post #16 - September 10th, 2007, 2:42 pm Post #16 - September 10th, 2007, 2:42 pm
    Looks exceptional, and I'd go this evening if I weren't still feeling a little "brined" from an excursion to LSC last night.
  • Post #17 - September 10th, 2007, 3:00 pm
    Post #17 - September 10th, 2007, 3:00 pm Post #17 - September 10th, 2007, 3:00 pm
    yellow truffle wrote:If you have problems ordering this in English, try "twice porked."

    As if the taste descriptions and pictures weren't incentive enough :)
    Sauce on the side, always, implied, axiomatic..........never a doubt, BBQ sauce without.

    Low & Slow
  • Post #18 - September 11th, 2007, 7:56 am
    Post #18 - September 11th, 2007, 7:56 am Post #18 - September 11th, 2007, 7:56 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Fish in chili broth/oil
    This pot of fish was breathtakingly spectacular. Here, 5-spice, szechuan peppercorn and chilis provided most of the deep seasoning.

    Ron,

    Double Li is a terrific spot, a breath of spice laden fresh air in the seldom changing Chinatown scene. Service was good, Mr. Li quick with suggestions, and friendly, and the above mentioned Fish in Chili Oil's soft yielding texture, coupled with spice hot enough to cause me to think of the Firehouse a few doors down, was my favorite of the evening.

    Fish in Chili Oil/Broth
    Image

    On the other end of the spice spectrum our Light Tofu, which Mr. Lee said was not the Bear Paw Tofu, but in comparing Ron's picture and mine looks exactly the same, reminded me of a ultra light quenelle. Loved the light tofu, but some of the subtler flavors got lost as it came at the end of our spice intense meal, next time I'll order that first.

    Light Tofu
    Image

    Spicy Tofu and Pork Blood was interesting, fairly spicy with the blood evoking livery pudding. One of those dishes that, when the proprietor suggests, you almost have to order so he he does not think you a lightweight and tone down the rest of your order.

    Spicy Tofu and Pork Blood
    Image


    In the couple of dishes I was able to make a direct comparison to Lao Sze Chuan my preference is the Lao Sze Chuan version. Double Li's Cold Szechwan Tripe simply did not have the punch/power of Lao Sze Chuan mouth numbing gloriously spicy Sliced Beef and Maw Szechuan Style.

    Double Li's Dry Chili Chicken compares favorably to LSC's version of the same dish, though not quite as crisp. Both take second fiddle to LSC's Tony's Three Chili Chicken, spicy, crisp, bass note of sweet, one of Chicago's finest poultry preparations.

    Double Li Dry Chili Chicken
    Image

    Loved the full flavored Black Garlic Beef, was not particular moved by the Twice Porked, a wall board special of Spicy Duck or Crunchy Garlic Shrimp. Tender Peapod greens rounded out our meal.

    Company was terrific, always interesting conversation when LTHers are involved, and at less than $20 per person with a generous tip, we lingered for a while conversing so amped up the gratuity a bit, a very reasonably priced meal for 8.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Sauce on the side, always, implied, axiomatic..........never a doubt, BBQ sauce without.

    Low & Slow
  • Post #19 - September 11th, 2007, 3:11 pm
    Post #19 - September 11th, 2007, 3:11 pm Post #19 - September 11th, 2007, 3:11 pm
    Another great meal, fun company and some funny jokes. I secondthe recommendation for the black pepper garlic beef tenderloin. It has a great intial hit of pepper with a full garlic flavor and good textured beef. I wish we had ordered the lamb with cumin but I can wait to try it again at LSC.
    I used to think the brain was the most important part of the body. Then I realized who was telling me that.
  • Post #20 - September 11th, 2007, 10:38 pm
    Post #20 - September 11th, 2007, 10:38 pm Post #20 - September 11th, 2007, 10:38 pm
    I really enjoyed last night's dinner. The fish with chili oil and was a new experience for me in that the strong flavors of chili, garlic, something pickled (preserved vegetable?), ginger, and Szechuan peppercorns all blended perfectly and at the same time demanded to be noticed individually. Later, I found myself feeling very fortunate indeed to be in the company of such knowledgable, passionate, charming and hilarious company eating such a delicious dinner on such short notice. Vive LTH!
    Man : I can't understand how a poet like you can eat that stuff.
    T. S. Eliot: Ah, but you're not a poet.
  • Post #21 - September 12th, 2007, 7:52 am
    Post #21 - September 12th, 2007, 7:52 am Post #21 - September 12th, 2007, 7:52 am
    I hit Double Li last night with a few friends. I'll echo the sentiment running through this thread: excellent meal. We had a selection of dishes that have already been mentioned: lamb w cumin (our choice), fish in chili oil and light tofu (chef's choices). The tofu was my favorite, unlike any tofu dish I've had before, and aptly described by others above. I asked the chef how it's made, and he said something about mixing tofu and chicken in a blender and then steaming the mixture. Some aspects of the process were probably lost in translation. Nor was it ever clear to me how this "light tofu" is different from "bearpaw tofu," though the chef insisted that they are.

    Comparisons to LSC are inevitable. As for the only dish I've had at both places--lamb w cumin--I give the edge to LSC. Their version is much more intensely cumin-flavored and quite a bit spicier. But there are plenty of reasons I'll be back to Double Li, not least the tofu. Also, Double is much less crowded, and as a result feels a little more laid back and relaxing. I did note that there were relatively few dishes listed in English on the Double Li menu, so exploring their offerings more deeply may require a little effort and interaction w the staff for those of us who don't read Chinese.
  • Post #22 - September 12th, 2007, 1:20 pm
    Post #22 - September 12th, 2007, 1:20 pm Post #22 - September 12th, 2007, 1:20 pm
    The description of the bearpaw tofu upthread mentions egg in the chicken & tofu mix; this seems to be missing from the light tofu? That may be the difference, though both sound delicious.
  • Post #23 - September 12th, 2007, 1:30 pm
    Post #23 - September 12th, 2007, 1:30 pm Post #23 - September 12th, 2007, 1:30 pm
    A couple of quick thoughts/comments:

    Gary, that Spicy Tofu and Pork Blood looks great. I'll definitely have to try it out next time I'm there. I'm glad your visit was enjoyable, even it was a bit mixed, food-wise.

    Regarding the Dry Chili Chicken, the version served on Tuesday night looks a bit wetter than the version I had at my visit -- at least upon glancing at the pics. The dish we had was crispy and crunchy with no exterior moisture on the individual pieces.

    As for the Bearpaw tofu, I'm honestly not sure that's what we had. I just assumed, from looking at it and its description in the menu, that it was the dish we were served. In any case, the dish we had, pictured above, contained finely-ground chicken, tofu and egg, according to Mr. Li.

    =R=
    If I asked my customers what they wanted, they would have said faster horses --Henry Ford

    Without wood, barbecue wouldn’t be barbecue -- Aaron Franklin

    Freedom demands that those in power allow others to think for themselves.

    I just wanna live until I gotta die. I know I ain't perfect but God knows I try --Todd Snider
  • Post #24 - September 12th, 2007, 3:06 pm
    Post #24 - September 12th, 2007, 3:06 pm Post #24 - September 12th, 2007, 3:06 pm
    Athena wrote:The description of the bearpaw tofu upthread mentions egg in the chicken & tofu mix; this seems to be missing from the light tofu? That may be the difference, though both sound delicious.

    Double checking my notes.....

    Mr. Li definitely said Light Tofu contains ground chicken, tofu, and, though I did not write down egg, that does not preclude egg from being one of the ingredients. May be he simply did not mention the egg, might be due to poor note taking on my part or, as you say, that may be the difference.

    Guess we have to go back to Double Li order both and make a side by side comparison.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Sauce on the side, always, implied, axiomatic..........never a doubt, BBQ sauce without.

    Low & Slow
  • Post #25 - September 12th, 2007, 3:20 pm
    Post #25 - September 12th, 2007, 3:20 pm Post #25 - September 12th, 2007, 3:20 pm
    G Wiv wrote:
    Athena wrote:The description of the bearpaw tofu upthread mentions egg in the chicken & tofu mix; this seems to be missing from the light tofu? That may be the difference, though both sound delicious.

    Double checking my notes.....

    Mr. Li definitely said Light Tofu contains ground chicken, tofu, and, though I did not write down egg, that does not preclude egg from being one of the ingredients. May be he simply did not mention the egg, might be due to poor note taking on my part or, as you say, that may be the difference.

    Guess we have to go back to Double Li order both and make a side by side comparison.

    Enjoy,
    Gary


    He also said, quite emphatically, that bearclaw tofu was a different dish...twice.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #26 - September 12th, 2007, 3:35 pm
    Post #26 - September 12th, 2007, 3:35 pm Post #26 - September 12th, 2007, 3:35 pm
    stevez wrote:He also said, quite emphatically, that bearclaw tofu was a different dish...twice.

    Yes he (Mr. Li) did, but they sure as heck look and sound similar, which is why I said a side by side is in order.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Sauce on the side, always, implied, axiomatic..........never a doubt, BBQ sauce without.

    Low & Slow
  • Post #27 - September 12th, 2007, 4:38 pm
    Post #27 - September 12th, 2007, 4:38 pm Post #27 - September 12th, 2007, 4:38 pm
    stevez wrote:
    G Wiv wrote:
    Athena wrote:The description of the bearpaw tofu upthread mentions egg in the chicken & tofu mix; this seems to be missing from the light tofu? That may be the difference, though both sound delicious.

    Double checking my notes.....

    Mr. Li definitely said Light Tofu contains ground chicken, tofu, and, though I did not write down egg, that does not preclude egg from being one of the ingredients. May be he simply did not mention the egg, might be due to poor note taking on my part or, as you say, that may be the difference.

    Guess we have to go back to Double Li order both and make a side by side comparison.

    Enjoy,
    Gary



    He also said, quite emphatically, that bearclaw tofu was a different dish...twice.


    Quoth Dunlop, Land of Plenty, pg. 316:

    variation of "homestyle bean curd"

    bear's paw bean curd:

    ...bean curd is not deep fried, but fried in a little oil on the surface of the wok until it is toasty and golden in places, lending it a puckered appearance "like a bear's paw"
    "Johnny thought when all purpose had been forgotten the world would end this way, with a dance. He slumped back in a corner, drew his knees up to his chin, and watched."-Derek Jarman
  • Post #28 - September 13th, 2007, 5:28 pm
    Post #28 - September 13th, 2007, 5:28 pm Post #28 - September 13th, 2007, 5:28 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Image

    Call it the pocket tofu and there should hopefully be no problem in getting this dish.

    (pocket)(tufo)
  • Post #29 - September 20th, 2007, 12:22 pm
    Post #29 - September 20th, 2007, 12:22 pm Post #29 - September 20th, 2007, 12:22 pm
    I went there last night and was very impressed. I had the dried chili chicken (many more dried chilis than the table next to me), fish in chili oil and ma po tofu. I would definitely return. I was a bit miffed at the "only Chinese" portion of the menu. It was considerably larger than the English only section. What country is this? I know no one who knows Mandarin to take. Un fair. I should boycott but it was just so good.
  • Post #30 - September 20th, 2007, 1:13 pm
    Post #30 - September 20th, 2007, 1:13 pm Post #30 - September 20th, 2007, 1:13 pm
    Hi,

    You could take a different approach to the menu: get a copy and ask someone to translate it. You can then point confidently to the Chinese and get it.

    You could take the real explorer aspect to: order the unknown dish, document and take pictures.

    Anyway, it would be fun and an interesting contribution.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast

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