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Needed: Butcher of Raccoon

Needed: Butcher of Raccoon
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  • Needed: Butcher of Raccoon

    Post #1 - January 3rd, 2005, 7:23 am
    Post #1 - January 3rd, 2005, 7:23 am Post #1 - January 3rd, 2005, 7:23 am
    Needed: Butcher of Raccoon

    I may soon have access to a quantity of fresh raccoon that will need to be cleaned and butchered.

    I have some history with the raccoon as entree. I lived in a Hyde Park commune in the 70's, and like most commie collectives (Power to the People), we hired a cook who made us dinner every night, and she would sometimes cook up the raccoon with chitterlings on the side.

    If you haven't had raccoon, it'a kind of a hybrid of pork and duck: stringy, sometimes gamey, dark meat. Definitely edible, and as I understand it, very popular in some regions. Try it; you might just like it.

    Anyhow, I need a place that can get it ready for me.

    David "Thank God I'm a Country Boy" Hammond
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #2 - January 3rd, 2005, 10:11 am
    Post #2 - January 3rd, 2005, 10:11 am Post #2 - January 3rd, 2005, 10:11 am
    HI,

    Information like this is definitely word-of-mouth.

    I have been on a similar trek when it comes to roadkill deer. I learned some police departments keep a list of people interested in roadkill deer to consume. Depending on how the deer met its' demise and how quickly you can reach the scene to collect, there can be decent meat available. So when your name reaches the top of the list, you have first opportunity to accept or decline a roadkill deer. Unless of course, someone else pulls up in a pick-up and collects it before you.

    From talking to police officers about this roadkill situation, I have informally learned who may be able to help. It is not likely a butcher because of the health standard hoops they have to jump.

    If you search under 'raccoon butchering' or 'raccoon dressing' you will find great information like this:

    Wild Game Dressing Tips

    As always start with a clean kill to the head. Raccoon are best when taken in the winter months. Cut the jugular vein and hang by tail immediately after the kill. Keep cool until ready to dress. Remove the glands from under the front legs and fleshy part of the rear legs before dressing. Remove as much fat as possible from the carcass. Gut, remove head, tail, and feet, rinse well. In a non metallic container mix 2 gallons water with 5 tablespoons baking soda and 1/2 cup salt. Completely submerge possum in brine, refrigerate overnight before preparing. If you are going to store in the freezer for any length of time it is best to freeze in a plastic container filled with water with a tightly sealed lid.


    Personally, I don't see why you don't want to give it a try yourself. If you want help (aka the blind leading the blind), then let me know.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #3 - January 3rd, 2005, 10:18 am
    Post #3 - January 3rd, 2005, 10:18 am Post #3 - January 3rd, 2005, 10:18 am
    I know that in parts of Ontario, CA, large road kills (bear and deer) are directed to the food shelters. It offends the city folk who hear about it but the locals really appreciate it.

    I have heard a lot of people talk of eating oppossum, rabbits, etc. However, raccoon is not one that I have heard of anyone butchering for food.
  • Post #4 - January 3rd, 2005, 10:19 am
    Post #4 - January 3rd, 2005, 10:19 am Post #4 - January 3rd, 2005, 10:19 am
    That is Canada, not California.
  • Post #5 - January 3rd, 2005, 10:24 am
    Post #5 - January 3rd, 2005, 10:24 am Post #5 - January 3rd, 2005, 10:24 am
    Hi,

    I went to a potluck dinner in St. Louis a few years ago. One of the featured options was Mr. and Mrs. Raccoon. Each was roasted like a turkey with stuffing inside. These were very thoroughly cooked to the point of overcooked, though I understand they were being cautious.

    I will likely be going to this dinner again in the next month. If the 'Coon's' show up, they will be captured on film and posted here for posterity ... whatever that means in the internet.
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #6 - January 3rd, 2005, 10:28 am
    Post #6 - January 3rd, 2005, 10:28 am Post #6 - January 3rd, 2005, 10:28 am
    I know that 1980's and earlier editions of The Joy of Cooking have instructions for dressing various varmints.

    Brunswick stew, IIRC, is usually 'possum or raccoon, although I've only had it with chicken.

    Just one note: Are you certain of the animals being rabies-free?
  • Post #7 - January 3rd, 2005, 11:11 am
    Post #7 - January 3rd, 2005, 11:11 am Post #7 - January 3rd, 2005, 11:11 am
    Hi,

    I saw this on rabies, when I was looking around initially. Sanitation and careful handling seems key.
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #8 - January 3rd, 2005, 11:14 am
    Post #8 - January 3rd, 2005, 11:14 am Post #8 - January 3rd, 2005, 11:14 am
    C2, from the article you linked to, I was relieved to see that rabies is not passed through the meat of the animal (I did not have a conclusive answer to JoelF's very pertinent question).

    Hammond
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #9 - January 3rd, 2005, 2:08 pm
    Post #9 - January 3rd, 2005, 2:08 pm Post #9 - January 3rd, 2005, 2:08 pm
    Without research, my gut feeling said that even if cooking destroyed the virus, be very cautious about handling during butchering.
  • Post #10 - January 3rd, 2005, 2:11 pm
    Post #10 - January 3rd, 2005, 2:11 pm Post #10 - January 3rd, 2005, 2:11 pm
    JoelF wrote:Without research, my gut feeling said that even if cooking destroyed the virus, be very cautious about handling during butchering.


    JoelF, right, yes, butchering a potentially rabid creature requires extreme caution (a dead animal's teeth can still pierce skin)...and someone that knows what they're doing (which rules me out for that particular job).

    Hammond
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #11 - January 3rd, 2005, 2:15 pm
    Post #11 - January 3rd, 2005, 2:15 pm Post #11 - January 3rd, 2005, 2:15 pm
    David Hammond wrote:
    JoelF wrote:Without research, my gut feeling said that even if cooking destroyed the virus, be very cautious about handling during butchering.


    JoelF, right, yes, butchering a potentially rabid creature requires extreme caution (a dead animal's teeth can still pierce skin)...and someone that knows what they're doing (which rules me out for that particular job).


    This discussion reminds me of someone who regularly hunted deer in Wisconsin and occasionally gave me various cuts of venison. He informed me that the people who dressed the deer always wore surgical gloves and worked carefully on account of the risk of becoming infected with Lyme disease.

    Antonius
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #12 - January 3rd, 2005, 2:37 pm
    Post #12 - January 3rd, 2005, 2:37 pm Post #12 - January 3rd, 2005, 2:37 pm
    David-- Please post when you eat the raccoon so we'll know the time period during which we should avoid being bitten by you or coming in contact with your saliva or mucus.
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  • Post #13 - January 3rd, 2005, 2:49 pm
    Post #13 - January 3rd, 2005, 2:49 pm Post #13 - January 3rd, 2005, 2:49 pm
    Raccoons and bears are the two main wild carriers of trichinosis, so thorough cooking has been a good precaution. I suspect that the near elimination of trichinosis in pigs due to no longer feeding garbage, let alone uncooked garbage, has reduced if not nearly eliminated trichinosis in the wild. Raccoons love to get into garbage cans and so would be vulnerable to any trichinia-bearing scraps.
  • Post #14 - January 3rd, 2005, 3:11 pm
    Post #14 - January 3rd, 2005, 3:11 pm Post #14 - January 3rd, 2005, 3:11 pm
    Mike G wrote:David-- Please post when you eat the raccoon so we'll know the time period during which we should avoid being bitten by you or coming in contact with your saliva or mucus.


    MikeG,

    Just checked my traps. No hits yet. You may safely enjoy my spittle for at least the next 24-48 hours.

    Hammond
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #15 - January 3rd, 2005, 9:57 pm
    Post #15 - January 3rd, 2005, 9:57 pm Post #15 - January 3rd, 2005, 9:57 pm
    David,

    Are you going to print new business cards?

    David Hammond, Bon Vivant, Writer, Monte Cristo historian, Trapper

    Maybe you should bring the pelts to you buddy the hatter. Will we soon see you sporting a Davey Crockett knock-off?

    Best,
    Al
  • Post #16 - January 3rd, 2005, 11:10 pm
    Post #16 - January 3rd, 2005, 11:10 pm Post #16 - January 3rd, 2005, 11:10 pm
    Al Ehrhardt wrote:Will we soon see you sporting a Davey Crockett knock-off?


    Got one.

    But you've touched on a key aspect of my planned Varmint Removal/Catering service. The raccoon is not only a tasty animal, but it also sports a coat that can be used for, as you suggest, hats, as well as Sonny Bono vests, James Bond-type massage mittens, attractive things for women to wear around their necks, etc.

    This is going to be big, I tell ya'. Bigger than big!

    David "The Future Belongs to Dreamers" Hammond
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #17 - January 4th, 2005, 10:20 pm
    Post #17 - January 4th, 2005, 10:20 pm Post #17 - January 4th, 2005, 10:20 pm
    Hi,

    I have a dear friend I often refer to as the "Chicken Lady." We have lots in common, rarely see each other and have a terrific time whenever the opportunity allows.

    She raises chickens for her consumption as well as for her friends. She used to "do the deed" herself until she found someone who charged her a dollar to not only "do the deed" but eviscerate and de-feather. On a hunch, I contacted her about the Raccoon dressing and butchering. She replied, "The chicken butcher does all kinds of animals. Gallaways in Como, IL.: 815/626-0305." They may just advise who "does the deed" closer to home.
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #18 - January 4th, 2005, 10:25 pm
    Post #18 - January 4th, 2005, 10:25 pm Post #18 - January 4th, 2005, 10:25 pm
    C2,

    I just called. They don't do raccoon. I'll call again tomorrow and see if I can get recommendations on who might.

    Hammond
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #19 - January 6th, 2005, 8:59 pm
    Post #19 - January 6th, 2005, 8:59 pm Post #19 - January 6th, 2005, 8:59 pm
    David,

    Call your local gun shop/hunting supply store...I can give you a list of ten places in Wisconsin, although they might not be much help.

    In a pinch, you might also shoot an email to the Illinois Department of Natural Resources...anyone who is a professional most likely has a license to process issued by IDNR in addition to regular meat handling permits.

    Which of course begs the question, you got a license to trap small game thar boy? The fines are mighty steep. Even more so for transporting live animals without the necessary permit.

    The folks at Black Forest Market in Morton Grove should have an answer for you.

    pd
    Unchain your lunch money!
  • Post #20 - January 7th, 2005, 1:15 am
    Post #20 - January 7th, 2005, 1:15 am Post #20 - January 7th, 2005, 1:15 am
    pd,

    Black Forest Market looks full of possibilities...and the recommendation that I look into local gun shops seems very good, too. Which reminds me: we should really do a Chicagoland shoot/eat event. Maybe pistols at Lyons Sportsmen's and somewhere local for dinner.

    About the license, no, don't have one. The raccoons will be a gift to me...and any who cares to join me for dinner.

    Hammond
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #21 - January 7th, 2005, 8:28 am
    Post #21 - January 7th, 2005, 8:28 am Post #21 - January 7th, 2005, 8:28 am
    Davey Coon-skinner,

    I only mentioned the license because many folks here might not realize the game enforcement (state and Federal DNR and Dept. of Wildlife and Fisheries, or whatever it is called these days) works on the basis of light quantity of enforcement combined with the threat of heavy punishment, i.e., you may go your whole life without running into a game warden, but if caught without a license the fine is a few thousand dollars.

    Most folks who would process the animal are going to want to know who got it, where, when and how...CYA and food safety.

    BTW, I have a couple of juicy 40-50 pounders that regularly walk through my backyard (benefits of living near a large cemetary). Man, the meat is constantly walking by on the hoof, as it were. :shock:

    pd
    Unchain your lunch money!
  • Post #22 - January 7th, 2005, 9:05 am
    Post #22 - January 7th, 2005, 9:05 am Post #22 - January 7th, 2005, 9:05 am
    HI,

    When I was growing up, my next door neighbor and classmate played 'Davy Crockett' everyday after school. He would trap animals and do the deed himself. During this time, we had few problems with raccoons, rabbits, possums and squirrels. Everyone knew what he was up to and were delighted by the result.

    Joe grew up to be a licensed guide in Alaska.

    &&&

    When I picked up my roadkill pheasant, I was somewhat concerned about regulations. Whether this was in-season or out and what may happen if it was found in my possession.

    Roadkill deer only require a phone call to the local police, who will later contact the nature conservation authorities. My local police are supposed to call in every incident, however they do it once a month because of the regularity of roadkill deer.

    David - I have some wild game cookbooks, do you need any recipes? Mr and Mrs. Coon were cooked like turkeys: stuffed and roasted.
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #23 - January 7th, 2005, 9:30 am
    Post #23 - January 7th, 2005, 9:30 am Post #23 - January 7th, 2005, 9:30 am
    C2,

    Recipes will be great...at such point as I actually have a raccoon to cook!

    I would guess that the raccoon needs moist heat, rather than BBQ, though it would seem possible, given an abundance of raccoon, to experiment (maybe do them into some kind of jerky).

    Thanks and stay tuned.

    Hammond
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #24 - January 7th, 2005, 11:04 am
    Post #24 - January 7th, 2005, 11:04 am Post #24 - January 7th, 2005, 11:04 am
    I guess the coons will be a delicacy compared to those chrysalises in jelly that you had straight from the can :wink:
  • Post #25 - January 7th, 2005, 11:10 am
    Post #25 - January 7th, 2005, 11:10 am Post #25 - January 7th, 2005, 11:10 am
    Al Ehrhardt wrote:I guess the coons will be a delicacy compared to those chrysalises in jelly that you had straight from the can :wink:


    Al,

    Chrysalises in JELLY!? That's gross. No, they were au natural in a light brine and served, as I recall, with Cusano Rojo. :lol:

    Hammond
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #26 - January 7th, 2005, 11:58 am
    Post #26 - January 7th, 2005, 11:58 am Post #26 - January 7th, 2005, 11:58 am
    David

    I think you're trolling the wrong forum, hopefully this link will be of help to you.
    http://www.taxidermy.net/forums/IndustryArticles/03/a/03ADD0B5B8.html

    I like your idea for a Chicago shoot/eat event. Pdanne did a great job organising the last one ....sounds like he's planning another :twisted:

    I have a couple of juicy 40-50 pounders that regularly walk through my backyard (benefits of living near a large cemetary). Man, the meat is constantly walking by on the hoof, as it were.


    John
  • Post #27 - January 7th, 2005, 12:04 pm
    Post #27 - January 7th, 2005, 12:04 pm Post #27 - January 7th, 2005, 12:04 pm
    JSM wrote:David

    I think you're trolling the wrong forum, hopefully this link will be of help to you.
    http://www.taxidermy.net/forums/IndustryArticles/03/a/03ADD0B5B8.html

    John


    "First thing this morning I skinned him and started working on his feet. That has taken a good part of the day. But I did get all the way to that last joint on his feet. Then I split his lips nose and eyes, still more time for a rookie. now I see he has a membrane on his whole body."

    Buthering is going to be somewhat more challenging than anticipated -- I'm also going to leave the tanning to someone else.

    Hammond
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #28 - January 7th, 2005, 12:20 pm
    Post #28 - January 7th, 2005, 12:20 pm Post #28 - January 7th, 2005, 12:20 pm
    John, great link.

    In particular, I like that the thread has only two posts with advice and about thirty posts following up with who is being a bigger A******.

    David, the guy in the post is doing a full mount and spending considerable time fleshing around the smaller features. Butchering and pelting should only take maybe an hour, as you will cut at the forearms and knees, saving only the primal cuts.

    pd
    Unchain your lunch money!
  • Post #29 - January 7th, 2005, 1:15 pm
    Post #29 - January 7th, 2005, 1:15 pm Post #29 - January 7th, 2005, 1:15 pm
    Must be the season for raccoon...

    Here's a current Chowhound thread, in which is linked the article Eat More Beaver, published in St. Louis' alternative newsweekly.

    Cheers,

    Aaron
  • Post #30 - January 7th, 2005, 1:48 pm
    Post #30 - January 7th, 2005, 1:48 pm Post #30 - January 7th, 2005, 1:48 pm
    Aaron,

    Great link.

    << Joe tosses the carcass on the grill and smokes the meat for a few hours. They insist raccoon tastes better than roast beef. >>

    Mr. Wiviott has been silent through this discussion. Maybe there is a need for him to lead a coon smoking lesson.

    Gary, BTW, have you had any coon eyeball tacos?

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