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  • Gene and Judes [World's Greatest Hot Dog Stand]

    Post #1 - November 24th, 2005, 11:49 am
    Post #1 - November 24th, 2005, 11:49 am Post #1 - November 24th, 2005, 11:49 am
    Image
    Certificate as awarded to Gene's & Jude's following this nomination.

    If I can be ever so brash and provocative (perhaps a bit mean-spirited on this Thanksgiving holiday :( ), can I point out that LTHForum is not a hot dog board? I say this not because there are no hot dog posts on this board (and boy does this board love Hot Dougs), but the core of this board, perhaps not the majority, but many, are not Chicago natives. And these people do not have the pull to a Chicago hot dog the way a native does, and this is why I think there has not been a lot of great threads on Chicago hot dogs, nor why I think you will find much LTH mention of the world's greatest hot dog stand.

    Before I reprint my words of nomination, let me point out two bits of background. The first, I was telling my wife, the Condiment Queen, just the other day, about how I associate Thanksgiving with a good hot dog as much as with turkey. Growing up, we nearly always had a hot dog from Ira's in Northbrook as a hold-me-over. Ma did not want to cook lunch while she was knee deep in dinner, and it was left to Dad (or later me), to run over to Ira's for hot dogs. If nothing can equal family Thanksgiving, it tells you how good those dogs could be if they came close. My other bit of background is to point you to this post to show you my bona fides on thinking about this subject.

    Now, on to the World's Greatest Hot Dog Stand (as written by me long ago):

    The greatest hot dog stand in the world serves neither hamburgers, nor polish sausage, nor grilled chicken sandwiches. There is no grill, no char-broiler, no spinning mound of gyros. At the greatest hot dog stand they only need buckets of simmering water for dogs, steamers for steaming buns and Supreme tamales and ever bubbling vats of oil for the fresh cut fries.

    You can see the greatest hot dog from far up the street. Beecause the greatest hot dog stand is all glass and harsh flouresant lights and stands as a beacon for all who are hungry. If you see a line, you know it will move fast.

    The greatest hot dog stand follows few of the rules laid out by the experts. Their buns are poppy-seedless. They offer few condiments beyond mustard (no ketchup on site). They do not dust their dog with celary salt. Yes, it is a Vienna sausage, but a skinnyish one at that. You really need to eat more than one at the greatest hot dog stand in the world, and many of the customers do (Sample customer, "I'll take seven hot dogs and an [extra] order of fries).

    The cooks at the greatest hot dog stand in the world occupy their time in between orders by thrusting fresh idaho potatos through a machine that converts them into perfect sized french fries. These amazing sticks of pure pototo get tossed on top of each offering so that if you want to eat them inside your hot dog bun, well you can and maybe should.

    The greatest hot dog stand in the world is a throwback to a world when people ate hot dogs. A throwback to a time when a great stand could keep their buns steamed just right, and their red hots, hot but not limp. So a Gene and Jude hot dog snaps right back at you. Interactive eating. With a side of hot fries, you will know you are at the greatest hot dog stand in the world.

    Gene and Judes
    2720 River Road
    River Grove, IL 60171-1325
    708-452-7634

    On the corner of River Road and Grand


    VI
    Last edited by Vital Information on November 24th, 2005, 9:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #2 - November 24th, 2005, 7:48 pm
    Post #2 - November 24th, 2005, 7:48 pm Post #2 - November 24th, 2005, 7:48 pm
    I'm a bred and born Chicagoan and I think I've eaten at some good hot dog stands over the years, but none has been more consistently good than Gene & Judes. My only disappointment with the place is that so many other people like the place as much, or more, than I do - and waiting as long as 30-minutes to get a couple of dogs when I'm on the run is annoying. I accept very vew annoyances, but do this one.
  • Post #3 - November 24th, 2005, 10:11 pm
    Post #3 - November 24th, 2005, 10:11 pm Post #3 - November 24th, 2005, 10:11 pm
    Ideal fries, great quality, but lacking one important Chi-dog requirements: neon-green relish.

    The other flaw is that in the summer you used to be able to get your dog, then wander across the parking lot and get a great shake from Cock Robin. Now you have to stand in a big square of gravel with a stupid look on your face trying to figure out why you're there. The McD's shakes behind G&J's just don't cut it. At all.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #4 - November 25th, 2005, 3:26 pm
    Post #4 - November 25th, 2005, 3:26 pm Post #4 - November 25th, 2005, 3:26 pm
    I am not really as enamored with Jene & Judes as some, but in terms of being worthy of a nomination in this category, I give a reasounding yes on all fronts. I heartily second the nomionation.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #5 - November 25th, 2005, 3:55 pm
    Post #5 - November 25th, 2005, 3:55 pm Post #5 - November 25th, 2005, 3:55 pm
    Hey Rob, have there been other posts on LTH about G & J's? If so, please link.

    As to LTH Forum not being a hot dog culture (as opposed to a Hot Doug culture), I have only this to say.

    The universe of sausages is a large & rich one. The Hot Dog, or more properly the Frankfurter, is just a tiny piece of it. As a lover of sausages, I like hot dogs, but they would not even be in my top ten sausage list. The dog receives a disproportionate amount of attention, IMHO. Just me, though, and a discussion of hot dogs and other sausages would not belong here in any case.
    d
    Feeling (south) loopy
  • Post #6 - November 26th, 2005, 12:17 am
    Post #6 - November 26th, 2005, 12:17 am Post #6 - November 26th, 2005, 12:17 am
    VI says, "LTH is not a hot dog board," and is, as usual correct. But I think this says more about us as selective posters than our passions.

    I think a great majority of us came from Chowhound and are tired of the too often asked questions such as "Who has the best Chicago hot dog?" There are plenty of places that produce a consistantly very good Chicago dog (as well as plenty that don't seem to have a clue.) And that's why we stay here and think a bit before we post. I think the arrival of Portillo's, that puts a great Chicago dog within everyone's reach, helped dimmed the fervor. Oh we will debate such inimitable Chicago foods as Italian beef or pizza, but I submit that that there are more variables in these subjects.

    Gene and Jude's, though, does not produce a Chicago hot dog (nor NY) but its own "unique" product. Ahhh, I remember in what seems a life time ago, stumbling out of the Thirsty Whale to G&J's to rejuvenate my alcohol and rock and roll racked body. Somehow this sustenance enabled me to party on and make it home alive. The Thirsty Whale was sadly torn down for a BP/McD but memories remain.

    It's been years since I've been back to Gene and Jude's, but now my "adult" daughter and her friends talk about the place like its the new TBK. I hope it serves them well and guides them home.

    Long live Gene & Jude's -- a Chicagoland hotdog legend.

    -ramon
  • Post #7 - November 26th, 2005, 8:53 am
    Post #7 - November 26th, 2005, 8:53 am Post #7 - November 26th, 2005, 8:53 am
    Ramon wrote:Gene and Jude's, though, does not produce a Chicago hot dog (nor NY) but its own "unique" product.


    Ramon,

    I would respecfully dissagree with you. Gene & Judes produces a dog that is very true to the ur-dog in Chicago. Those of us of a certain age can remember many a dog of exactly this genre; served in much the same manner (greasy hand cut fries on top of the sparsly dressed natural casing dog, wrapped together and served in a greasy paper bag.) Places like Lerners on the North Side and many others served dogs in this style long before they got prettied up by such things as tomatoes and char broiling, etc. There are still a few places serving this style of dog, and I seek them out when I can. Gene & Judes is but one example, but the best of this dog genre can be found at Jimmy's on Pulaski & Grand. (Not that Gene & Judes doesn't deserve this award.)
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #8 - November 26th, 2005, 9:47 am
    Post #8 - November 26th, 2005, 9:47 am Post #8 - November 26th, 2005, 9:47 am
    stevez wrote:Gene & Judes produces a dog that is very true to the ur-dog in Chicago. Those of us of a certain age can remember many a dog of exactly this genre; served in much the same manner (greasy hand cut fries on top of the sparsly dressed natural casing dog, wrapped together and served in a greasy paper bag.) Places like Lerners on the North Side and many others served dogs in this style long before they got prettied up by such things as tomatoes and char broiling, etc. There are still a few places serving this style of dog, and I seek them out when I can. Gene & Judes is but one example, but the best of this dog genre can be found at Jimmy's on Pulaski & Grand. (Not that Gene & Judes doesn't deserve this award.)


    Steve:

    Just let me add that the style which you describe as the Ur-dog (Urhund) of Chicago seems to me to fit quite closely to what the venerable old Polk and Western stand in beautiful Tri-Taylor
    http://lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.php?p=33396#33396

    Polk & Western Dogs and Fries (left: polish; right: dog)
    Image
    Is this then basically the same style as found at G&J's?

    Is there already posted a picture of Gene & Jude's dog/fry combo? If not, could someone add one to the thread?

    Antonius
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #9 - November 26th, 2005, 10:29 am
    Post #9 - November 26th, 2005, 10:29 am Post #9 - November 26th, 2005, 10:29 am
    Antonious, that looks almost like Gene and Judes, the fries are close, but G&J's hot dog is skinnier.
  • Post #10 - November 26th, 2005, 12:01 pm
    Post #10 - November 26th, 2005, 12:01 pm Post #10 - November 26th, 2005, 12:01 pm
    Rob:

    David Hammond sent me the following picture, which I publish at his request:

    Gene & Jude's Hot dog and Fries (Photograph courtesy of David Hammond):
    Image

    I wish the hot dog itself were more visible in this picture but from what one can see, G&J's offering does seem to be of the same style as P&W's, though I think the G&J fries look less greasy and a little more carefully cut.

    Nicely composed photo, David. Thanks!

    Antonius
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #11 - November 26th, 2005, 12:18 pm
    Post #11 - November 26th, 2005, 12:18 pm Post #11 - November 26th, 2005, 12:18 pm
    stevez wrote:Gene & Judes is but one example, but the best of this dog genre can be found at Jimmy's on Pulaski & Grand. (Not that Gene & Judes doesn't deserve this award.)

    Steve,

    Jimmy's is an excellent example of the Chicago minimalist style dog w/fries in the wrapper, as is, as Antonius pointed out, Polk & Western.

    Jimmy's [Grand & Pulaski]
    Image

    Gene and Jude's is certainly a worthy GNR nomination, even if not alone in it's particular style. It would be nice, however, to see a few links to past Gene and Jude's posts.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Sauce on the side, always, implied, axiomatic..........never a doubt, BBQ sauce without.

    Low & Slow
  • Post #12 - November 26th, 2005, 1:58 pm
    Post #12 - November 26th, 2005, 1:58 pm Post #12 - November 26th, 2005, 1:58 pm
    I come from a long line of hot dog stand workers. My mother sold hot dogs on Maxwell Street, my aunt worked at Hot Dog Island on Devon for many years and then moved to Wolfy's until retirement. Growing up in Chicago a hot dog with everything until about the 1960's meant mustard, relish, onions and peppers only. Fries came with and they were always hand cut and fresh made wrapped in the package with the hot dog. As a teen we would go to hot dog island, (before Flukeys and Wolfys opened) get a hot dog which came with fries and many a time would take the hot dog out of the bun and eat a french fry sandwich, but definitely we had fries on the sandwich along with the mustard relish etc.

    What most people today think of as a Chicago Dog the addition of tomatoes and that neon relish instead of the darker green came with the reopening of Flukeys on Western and then taken up by Wolfys and others.

    Gene and Jude's is an old time hot dog stand a dying breed today and definately worthy of a GNR award.
    Paulette
  • Post #13 - November 26th, 2005, 4:54 pm
    Post #13 - November 26th, 2005, 4:54 pm Post #13 - November 26th, 2005, 4:54 pm
    Your wish is my command

    Image

    Unfortunately my "dog with everything" today lacked sport peppers. Maybe I forgot how to order properly.

    In so far as links to other posts regarding Gene & Jude's there are many of them (with different spellings). I don't think they add much to the discussion, but I believe they are a requirement for this program:

    http://www.lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.ph ... udes#45456

    http://www.lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.ph ... udes#44107

    http://www.lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.ph ... udes#33451

    http://www.lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.ph ... udes#31751

    http://www.lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.ph ... udes#22716

    http://www.lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.ph ... udes#21905

    There are more, but I'm getting bored.

    -ramon
  • Post #14 - November 26th, 2005, 6:43 pm
    Post #14 - November 26th, 2005, 6:43 pm Post #14 - November 26th, 2005, 6:43 pm
    Antonius wrote:Steve:

    Just let me add that the style which you describe as the Ur-dog (Urhund) of Chicago seems to me to fit quite closely to what the venerable old Polk and Western stand


    Exactly. There are examples of these type of dogs throughout the city. I'd also include the Polk and Western dog higher in the pantheon of this genre than Gene & Judes. I'd also say the the picture you posted (courtesy of Hammond) shows fries that are uncharacteristically un-greasy.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #15 - November 26th, 2005, 7:34 pm
    Post #15 - November 26th, 2005, 7:34 pm Post #15 - November 26th, 2005, 7:34 pm
    Hey VI and others,

    Is there some connection between Gene and Jude's and Polk and Western? Back in the chowhound thread from 2001 on Polk and Western Rene G points out that Gene and Jude's has a sign that says “Relished Since 1946 at Polk and Western".

    (Here is the link to that post:
    http://www.chowhound.com/midwest/boards ... /4527.html )

    Is the current Polk and Western Hot Dogs in the old building of G & J's? Anyone know?

    Amata
  • Post #16 - November 28th, 2005, 9:50 pm
    Post #16 - November 28th, 2005, 9:50 pm Post #16 - November 28th, 2005, 9:50 pm
    My brother used to live at Belmont and Harlem and almost every Saturday nite he would light a campfire (in an outdoorpit) in his yard. As we sat around telling stories and shivering, we would all feel the need to make a run to G&J'ds.

    Well last spring my brother moved to Naperville, much to the shock and horror of our Chicago family and all he does is crab about the lack of good food out there.

    But what bugs me is that now my hubby and I have to make "plans" to go to gene and judes and that takes away the fun. In fact as I type this I am tempted to pack up my baby daughter and hubby and make a "run", like the good old days!
    Please excuse my ramblings!
    The clown is down!
  • Post #17 - November 29th, 2005, 9:18 am
    Post #17 - November 29th, 2005, 9:18 am Post #17 - November 29th, 2005, 9:18 am
    JeanneBean wrote:Well last spring my brother moved to Naperville, much to the shock and horror of our Chicago family and all he does is crab about the lack of good food out there.



    JeanneBean,

    Tell your brother that there is plenty of tasty items to be found in Naperville and the surrounding area. You just have to eat through all the crap to find the gems.

    Flip
    "Beer is proof God loves us, and wants us to be Happy"
    -Ben Franklin-
  • Post #18 - November 29th, 2005, 12:32 pm
    Post #18 - November 29th, 2005, 12:32 pm Post #18 - November 29th, 2005, 12:32 pm
    Well last spring my brother moved to Naperville, much to the shock and horror of our Chicago family and all he does is crab about the lack of good food out there.


    :lol:

    I have had two people in the last month tell me how lucky I am to live in Naperville because we have so many good restaurants. While I do not exactly agree, there is no lack of good food. I can easily list 10 places that are very good, indeed, starting with our local GNR recipient, Fabulous Noodles.

    Your brother is probably really complaining about not being around the old places he liked. Believe me, I have been to places that really did not have any good food - I spent a couple of months in Independence, Kansas a few years ago, and the best food within 20 miles, truly, was the local Subway - and N'ville is not one.

    Flip, LTE JeffB, me, or many others would be happy to provide lots of suggestions for your brother, just ask.
    d
    Feeling (south) loopy
  • Post #19 - November 30th, 2005, 12:02 am
    Post #19 - November 30th, 2005, 12:02 am Post #19 - November 30th, 2005, 12:02 am
    He is most in need of good pizza.
    He teaches at Maine South in Park Ridge and every Friday he drives from there to Belmont and Harlem to a little place called Colutas and picks up a stuffed pizza than heads south to 290 and gets home in time to kiss his daughters goodnite because it takes him so long to get home.

    For his birthday I even bought him a pizza warmer like delivery guys use to help him out.

    He lives around 87th and Lisson if that helps.
    The clown is down!
  • Post #20 - November 30th, 2005, 9:04 am
    Post #20 - November 30th, 2005, 9:04 am Post #20 - November 30th, 2005, 9:04 am
    JeanneBean wrote:
    He lives around 87th and Lisson if that helps.


    JB,

    Although we seem to be wandering off the topic of G&J's your brother is right in the neighborhood. For stuffed pizza I don't know where to send him, but my go to for thin crust is Traverso's on Plainfield Rd. They do deliver to the area (at least to my area, which is two subdivisions away from your brother), but pickup is generally a lot faster.

    If he hasn't tried them yet there is Little Italian on Bailey Road. They use two different sauces on their pies. A thicker sweeter sauce for the thin and a fresher, chunkier sauce for the pan and stuffed. I haven't had a pie from there in a number of years, but used to deliver for the Lisle location.

    Flip
    "Beer is proof God loves us, and wants us to be Happy"
    -Ben Franklin-
  • Post #21 - November 30th, 2005, 12:10 pm
    Post #21 - November 30th, 2005, 12:10 pm Post #21 - November 30th, 2005, 12:10 pm
    Jeanne,
    Great idea with the pizza warmer. Another suggestion- your brother could ask if Coluta's could par-bake his pizza and he could finish it off in the oven at home. I've never had their stuffed pizza, relying on them for "thin" crust in the neighborhood. It is definitely not cracker thin, but it's pretty darn good and brings back lots of childhood memories.

    In your seach for local Chinese, Chopstick Express right next door to Coluta's has generous portions of all your Americanized Chinese favorites. They're quick and I've found them to be pretty reliable.

    Coluta's Pizza
    (773) 283-4466
    3239 N Harlem Ave
    Chicago, IL 60634

    Chopstick Express
    unlisted, but right next door to Coluta's
  • Post #22 - November 30th, 2005, 1:29 pm
    Post #22 - November 30th, 2005, 1:29 pm Post #22 - November 30th, 2005, 1:29 pm
    JeanneBean wrote:He is most in need of good pizza.

    For his birthday I even bought him a pizza warmer like delivery guys use to help him out.

    He lives around 87th and Lisson if that helps.


    Like Flip, I am more a fan of thin crust, and hardly can claim to be a connoisseur of pizza, but Pasta Amore at 87th and route 59 offers a range of pizzas including two or three variations on stuffed pizza. You can call ahead and order or just stop by and buy a slice of the versions they have ready. For more on Pasta Amore, you can go here http://lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.php?p=30307#30307.

    Of course, getting from 87th & Lisson to 87th & route 59 is not as easy as it sounds, since there is a river between them and no bridge on 87th, but it is no more than 15 minutes, and he will undoubtedly find some tasty offerings whether the stuffed pizza choices meet his standards or not.

    Happy to help, even if this digression does not exactly belong in VI's GNR nomination 8)
    d
    Feeling (south) loopy
  • Post #23 - November 30th, 2005, 2:01 pm
    Post #23 - November 30th, 2005, 2:01 pm Post #23 - November 30th, 2005, 2:01 pm
    Thanks everyone! I've already e-mailed him the suggestions! :D
    The clown is down!
  • Post #24 - December 8th, 2005, 8:38 am
    Post #24 - December 8th, 2005, 8:38 am Post #24 - December 8th, 2005, 8:38 am
    stevez wrote:
    Ramon wrote:Gene and Jude's, though, does not produce a Chicago hot dog (nor NY) but its own "unique" product.


    Ramon,

    I would respecfully dissagree with you. Gene & Judes produces a dog that is very true to the ur-dog in Chicago. Those of us of a certain age can remember many a dog of exactly this genre; served in much the same manner (greasy hand cut fries on top of the sparsly dressed natural casing dog, wrapped together and served in a greasy paper bag.) Places like Lerners on the North Side and many others served dogs in this style long before they got prettied up by such things as tomatoes and char broiling, etc. There are still a few places serving this style of dog, and I seek them out when I can. Gene & Judes is but one example, but the best of this dog genre can be found at Jimmy's on Pulaski & Grand. (Not that Gene & Judes doesn't deserve this award.)


    After what may be our last drinks at the venerable Trader Vic's, Hat Hammond and myself sobered up slightly with a dog at Jimmy's. No sales people, wink, wink, so some charm was already missing...

    ...and I still think the dog they serve here is sub-par as compared to G&J (or say, Weiner Circle). Still, the french fries were excellent, really excellent. I knocked the fries a bit in the Candlelite nomination thread, and if anyone wants to see the difference between good fries and great fries, just visit Jimmy's, ask for a large fries, a cup of the up-charged (45 cents) but worth it hot sauce and dig in.

    Rob
  • Post #25 - December 8th, 2005, 9:43 am
    Post #25 - December 8th, 2005, 9:43 am Post #25 - December 8th, 2005, 9:43 am
    Vital Information wrote:...and I still think the dog they serve here is sub-par as compared to G&J (or say, Weiner Circle). Still, the french fries were excellent, really excellent.

    Rob,

    Not sure what you mean by subpar. If you mean Jimmy's is slightly below Gene and Jude's or Wiener Circle, I disagree, but respect your preference and opinion. If by subpar you mean to imply Jimmy's is dreck on a bun and not worthy of being in the pantheon of great Chicago hot dog joints, I strenuously disagree.

    Jimmy's, G & J, Polk & Western and the now defunct Demon Dogs, all seem a similar style to me, Chicago minimalist. Jimmy's, of all the hot dog stands I've loved over the years, has been the most inconsistent, dog wise, but always retain that beautiful natural casing Snap that is absolutely necessary in a Chicago hot dog.

    Far as Jimmy's fries vs Candlelite, for me a fry does not have to be cut in-house to be acceptable. Crisp, good flavor, in the case of the Candlelite garlic and red wine vinegar, and crisp. Did I say crisp twice? :) My current favorite hot dog stand, Herm's on Dempster, uses out-of-the-bag skinny fries, but makes them nice and crisp, which is a real plus.

    Speaking of fries, last time I was at Wiener Circle the fries were perfect, much as you describe your's last night at Jimmy's, which are always excellent as well.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Sauce on the side, always, implied, axiomatic..........never a doubt, BBQ sauce without.

    Low & Slow
  • Post #26 - December 8th, 2005, 10:00 am
    Post #26 - December 8th, 2005, 10:00 am Post #26 - December 8th, 2005, 10:00 am
    G Wiv wrote:Not sure what you mean by subpar.

    I guess sub-par in the sense that Jimmy's just does not have as strong a defined "Chicago" hot dog taste to me. I think a Jimmy's dog in say, Peoria, would be pretty fine indeed, but against others that really shine, I find it pales.

    Like I say, the fries alone, make Jimmy's worth a visit. See the added flavor dimensions that come from fresh cut potatoes*. And they were plenty crisp!

    *On the subject of potato flavor, yesterday's Fall CSA came with some keeper red potatoes. I boiled a few up to add to a salad, and wow, just wow. Proof that potatoes can have quite a bit of flavor and nuance, and proof in the greatness of our local produce.
  • Post #27 - December 8th, 2005, 10:18 am
    Post #27 - December 8th, 2005, 10:18 am Post #27 - December 8th, 2005, 10:18 am
    Vital Information wrote:Like I say, the fries alone, make Jimmy's worth a visit. See the added flavor dimensions that come from fresh cut potatoes*. And they were plenty crisp!

    Rob,

    Certainly freshly cut fries have the potential to outshine frozen. Just that, to me, properly maintained, well cooked, meaning crisp, pre-cut fries are not a deal breaker in a hot dog stand.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Sauce on the side, always, implied, axiomatic..........never a doubt, BBQ sauce without.

    Low & Slow
  • Post #28 - December 8th, 2005, 10:21 am
    Post #28 - December 8th, 2005, 10:21 am Post #28 - December 8th, 2005, 10:21 am
    Man, whatever happens with this nomination, and I can't see any strong reason why it would not win based on this thread, we are going to spend a lot of time editing and splitting out the discussion to end up with a GNR thread on G&J's...
    Last edited by dicksond on December 8th, 2005, 3:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
    d
    Feeling (south) loopy
  • Post #29 - December 8th, 2005, 12:39 pm
    Post #29 - December 8th, 2005, 12:39 pm Post #29 - December 8th, 2005, 12:39 pm
    dicksond wrote:Man, whatever happens with this nomination, and I can't see any strong reason why it would not win based on this thread, we are going to spend a lot of time editng and splitting out the discussion to end up with a GNR thread on G&J's...


    I agree. G & J's certainly deserves the GNR award, whether they are the "best" version of this genre or not. Having said that, I'd like to point out to Rob that grouping Wiener's Circle in with places tht serve the G & J syle dog is just plain wrong. They are of a completely different school of Chicago Dog.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #30 - December 16th, 2005, 12:42 pm
    Post #30 - December 16th, 2005, 12:42 pm Post #30 - December 16th, 2005, 12:42 pm
    Since I see this is mentioned in a different thread as a place without much of an LTH track record, let me add that I finally made it out there (I pass it everytime I go to O'Hare so it was about time--next is Johnny's which is even closer and I've still missed in my 28 years of living in Oak Park :oops: )

    Based on my one visit I'd be delighted to see a GNR award. The atmosphere is stark and totally unassuming. It's not trying to be anything but a hot dog stand. The young staff is friendly and efficient. The hot dogs have a great snap and a good flavor. The buns are properly steamed. The fries are real, even if not at the level of, say, Parkey's, and it's great watching them cut up the potatoes on their handy dandy manual french fry cutter.

    Most importantly, though, Gene and Jude's has real support from its local community. It was so satisfying to see people of all ages and nationalities standing in line for 20 minutes at Gene and Jude's while the drive-in at the McD's next door was only doing a lackluster business.

    One last story. A couple of years ago Bill was asked to do a market research interview for Toyota. They came to the house with their video camera, a muckety muck from Toyota US, and, amazingly, a high level exec from Japan with his translator. The Japanese exec had asked their driver (who may have also been the person running the video--I don't remember all the details) to take him to a typical Chicago lunch spot. So they'd all gone to Gene and Jude's.

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