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Sarkis Cafe - Evanston, IL

Sarkis Cafe - Evanston, IL
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  • Sarkis Cafe - Evanston, IL

    Post #1 - November 17th, 2004, 5:34 am
    Post #1 - November 17th, 2004, 5:34 am Post #1 - November 17th, 2004, 5:34 am
    LTHForum,

    Sarkis is practically an institution, and I'm not so sure Sarkis, the namesake and previous owner, should not have been institutionalized. :) Sarkis is the kind of fellow you either love or hate, a real character, loud, flamboyant, lots of kisses and hugs for the women. I lean (slightly) toward Sarkis getting on my nerves.

    I like the food at Sarkis, though I stick to Disaster sausage and eggs served with buttered French bread toasted on the griddle then quartered length wise, and disaster sandwiches, but almost never go, even when my office was in Wilmette.

    The main reason I was an occasional customer, as opposed to regular, was not the food, or even Sarkis, but the fact the physical space is small, as in tiny, and can get very crowded. That and I always left wondering how I just spent so much on sausage, toast and eggs. :shock:

    There are new owners at Sarkis, though Sarkis occasionally makes a 'guest appearance,' and the food, which is very good breakfast/lunch food, appears unchanged.

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    Sarkis
    2632 Gross Point Rd
    Evanston, IL 60201
    847-328-9703
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #2 - November 17th, 2004, 5:46 am
    Post #2 - November 17th, 2004, 5:46 am Post #2 - November 17th, 2004, 5:46 am
    G Wiv wrote:I like the food at Sarkis, though I stick to Disaster sausage and eggs served with buttered French bread toasted on the griddle then quartered length wise, and disaster sandwiches, but almost never go, even when my office was in Wilmette.


    Multi-Ulti,

    Why are these Sarkis' menu items prefixed with "disaster"? They sound almost pedestrian.

    And why are we up so early posting on the forum?

    More questions to come,

    Hammond
  • Post #3 - November 17th, 2004, 6:27 am
    Post #3 - November 17th, 2004, 6:27 am Post #3 - November 17th, 2004, 6:27 am
    David Hammond wrote:Multi-Ulti,

    Why are these Sarkis' menu items prefixed with "disaster"? They sound almost pedestrian.

    And why are we up so early posting on the forum?

    More questions to come,

    Hammond


    Well.. as for me, I haven't gone to sleep yet. :shock:

    To answer your question, "disaster" is just another name for the flat-bar style sausage served at Sarkis. Pretty darn good.

    Eggs are alright at Sarkis - but I always get lorettas there since I never have encountered another place that serves them. I myself prefer the bacon loretta + one overeasy egg in it and extra veggies with a side of hash browns and a diet coke.

    I used to go to Sarkis a few times a week two years back... I love the food and I regret that I can't go. I come home from college for Turkey Day break on Friday :?

    Cathy2: So, you did try Sarkis? One of my first posts on chowhound was regarding Sarkis and I remember at that point you have never tried it before. What do you think of it?
  • Post #4 - November 17th, 2004, 7:14 am
    Post #4 - November 17th, 2004, 7:14 am Post #4 - November 17th, 2004, 7:14 am
    David Hammond wrote:Why are these Sarkis' menu items prefixed with "disaster"? They sound almost pedestrian.

    Hammond,

    As Scott said, Disaster is how Sarkis refers to their sausage, which is really quite good.

    As to why I am up so early, had a nice dinner with Ellen at Charlie's on Leavitt, including a bottle of wine, went to sleep early, and am now up with the roosters. That and I typically get up quite early. :)

    What are you doing up with the birds?

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #5 - November 17th, 2004, 7:23 am
    Post #5 - November 17th, 2004, 7:23 am Post #5 - November 17th, 2004, 7:23 am
    G Wiv wrote:What are you doing up with the birds?


    Am seriously considering a Big Baby for breakfast.

    Hammond
  • Post #6 - November 17th, 2004, 7:37 am
    Post #6 - November 17th, 2004, 7:37 am Post #6 - November 17th, 2004, 7:37 am
    David Hammond wrote:Am seriously considering a Big Baby for breakfast.

    You are a man among men!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #7 - November 17th, 2004, 9:47 am
    Post #7 - November 17th, 2004, 9:47 am Post #7 - November 17th, 2004, 9:47 am
    Hi,

    I stopped in at Sarkis yesterday, I have physically been there and have not yet eaten there. On the rear of the griddle was a large mound of grated potatoes waiting to turn into hash browns.

    From reading their menu, I don't quite have a concept of what a Loretta is, it sounds like a sandwich. Disaster, I have the menu in front of me, is listed as a side for breakfast and a sandwich featuring Armenian sausage. I was originally focussing on the sandwich. Though what Gary just described sounds divine with all the little this-and-thats I can see the bill being over $10. What do you think of the special hash browns with tomatoes, green peppers, onions and cheese? Usually, I ask for hash browns with extra onions.

    You're right about the place being very tiny, like very, very tiny with a interesting, dated interior which hasn't changed much since day one.

    I'm looking forward to tomorrow's lunch. Fortunately Gary, there is always next time!

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #8 - November 17th, 2004, 10:02 am
    Post #8 - November 17th, 2004, 10:02 am Post #8 - November 17th, 2004, 10:02 am
    Cathy2 wrote:From reading their menu, I don't quite have a concept of what a Loretta is, it sounds like a sandwich. Disaster, I have the menu in front of me, is listed as a side for breakfast and a sandwich featuring Armenian sausage. I was originally focussing on the sandwich. Though what Gary just described sounds divine with all the little this-and-thats I can see the bill being over $10. What do you think of the special hash browns with tomatoes, green peppers, onions and cheese? Usually, I ask for hash browns with extra onions.


    The loretta is basically about 6-8 inches of a french loaf halved, buttered and then quickly toasted on the grill, served with some Curt's table spice (at least, I think that's what the spice tastes like), choice of meat, melted cheese, and cubed onions, peppers, and tomatoes.

    The hash browns in general are not that great here - I like mine very soft on the inside and crispy outside, but here they just seem to be constantly soggy / a little rubbery at times. They act well as a filler, but really are worth nothing more. My suggestion would be to steer clear of the special hash browns and just enjoy the sandwich.

    I usually order a bacon loretta, extra veggies and 1 overeasy egg (egg inside sandwich) with hash browns and a diet coke there. that should run 6.50$ I believe (1$ extra for the egg).

    Also, if you are looking for another greasy spoon nearby, Sparky's on Oakton is not bad if you're looking for some ham and eggs.
  • Post #9 - November 17th, 2004, 11:22 am
    Post #9 - November 17th, 2004, 11:22 am Post #9 - November 17th, 2004, 11:22 am
    I've been to sarkis (or as a friend referred to it "the most overrated omelet in town" a few times). The disaster is a mild soujouk, not bad, but not all that either.

    I always thought the place was an institution more for the pesonality than the food, which is to my mind just ok
  • Post #10 - November 17th, 2004, 11:27 am
    Post #10 - November 17th, 2004, 11:27 am Post #10 - November 17th, 2004, 11:27 am
    Zim,

    I couldn't agree with you more. Back in my younger, drunker days, Sarki's was a frequent haunt after late night debauchery. Nowadays, I'm not sure the food is worth the visit. Don't get me wrong. The food is the same as ever...it's me that is different.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #11 - November 17th, 2004, 12:13 pm
    Post #11 - November 17th, 2004, 12:13 pm Post #11 - November 17th, 2004, 12:13 pm
    HI,

    Keep to the plan. We may only need to experience this place once.
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #12 - November 17th, 2004, 3:35 pm
    Post #12 - November 17th, 2004, 3:35 pm Post #12 - November 17th, 2004, 3:35 pm
    Wow! I didn't know Sarkis was still in business. We used to go there when I was in high school for omellettes and attitude. I am trying to fit this in my schedule.
  • Post #13 - November 18th, 2004, 10:13 pm
    Post #13 - November 18th, 2004, 10:13 pm Post #13 - November 18th, 2004, 10:13 pm
    Hi,

    I had scoped out Sarkis a few days earlier and collected a take-out menu. It really wasn't a take-out menu, rather a plastic covered menu normally kept for in-house purposes. I took it with me and used it to help decide what to have. When we returned today, I asked for a menu. They pointed to the sign on the wall. I then asked for the take-out menu because I thought Helen and Hattyn would appreciate the complete descriptions. I then watched the guy search high and low for the phantom menu, which I guess was on my desk at home. :oops:

    I had already decided to have the Disaster with eggs sunnyside up and hashbrowns with onions. I had to inquire how big the Disaster was because to have a second piece was $2.50. The manager was sent over, since he was the only one who could explain the menu items, he replied a Disaster is 1/4 pound. Ok, good, I can stick with a single Disaster.

    My plate arrived first with Helen and Hattyn's arriving a few minutes later. I'm used to simultaneous service and staggered was somewhat of a surprise especially as Helen and I had nearly the same thing. I'm polite, I'll wait for everyone to get their food.

    Meanwhile, a large group of kids, almost like a flock of birds, came storming in from Loyola High School. Not too many ordered though every latecomer who arrived needed a big shout. After about 10-15 minutes, the flock moved on though a minor amount were seen paying. When I left, I asked how many of those kids ordered. He replied, "Not enough." So this scene does confirm Sarkis reputation of a hangout, the place to be, rather than the place to eat.

    My eggs were not my favored squishy yellow sunnyside up. They seemed like they were basted or overeasy or some new way of cooking eggs I was unaware of because the yolks were already semi-cooked. My hashbrowns were satisfactory, they had plenty of onions, had enough crispy bits not to be accused of being hash-whites. The Dangerous element was this 4 inch oblong piece of garlicky beefy patty. A little tough to cut apart with your fork and spoon, no knife was ever offered to any of us. Were they worried we'd steal the silverware?

    Hattyn quietly inquired if Panera was starting to look good. Well, I have nothing against Panera, I appreciated the experience of visiting Sarkis though no repeat is required. Total damage for my meal with a Coke was $7.50.

    As we were leaving, I saw a ketchup bottle I wish I could have taken or at least a picture of for Hammond. It was a Heinz Ketchup bottle with the phrase "Hides the grill marks."

    On my list of life's adventures, my curiosity for Sarkis is satisfied.
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #14 - November 19th, 2004, 2:53 pm
    Post #14 - November 19th, 2004, 2:53 pm Post #14 - November 19th, 2004, 2:53 pm
    I'm guessing this thread was moved here from the Events Calendar forum after the event took place. Sorry I missed it before today; would have loved to meet some of you guys in person. Sarkis is just minutes from my office.

    I have a long history with Sarkis...went to NTW in the late '70s/early '80s and we hung out there quite a bit. There is a bust of Sarkis somewhere on the premises which my brother sculpted for him. Sarkis is a bit of a showman who always treated me and mine quite well. His cries of "My friends! Let me make you omlettes!" were quite bemusing to me as a half-baked high-schooler. But, the food at his joint was always very erratic. I remember being so familiar with his crew, that if certain people weren't "on" we'd just walk in and leave again without eating because of the reliability factor (or lack thereof). We had our favorite cooks and that was that.

    A few years back Sarkis sold the place to a former New Trier student (Jeff Kramen) who, very tragically, died shortly thereafter in a freak scuba accident while on vacation with his family--can't remember which Caribbean island. Pretty sure it's now run by Kramen's brother or other family member.

    Sarkis always boasted that his Disaster sausage was Armenian, as he was/is, but I can't attest to the veracity of the claim. I've found that portion size and overall quality have decreased at Sarkis over the years but it's still a spot we will hit on occasion. But I still associate the place with Kramen's fairly recent death, so it's not the happy and care-free high school hang out it used to be for me. I find it somewhat hard to believe that it's still around. I'm sorry but not overly-surprised to read the luke warm reviews of the group experience there this week.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #15 - November 19th, 2004, 7:49 pm
    Post #15 - November 19th, 2004, 7:49 pm Post #15 - November 19th, 2004, 7:49 pm
    I am delurking to tell you that I too went to New Trier (a million years ago). I grew up eating at Sarkis and accepting his sloppy, greasy kisses on my cheek. I am somewhat surprised at the menu choices you made, as I have never seen anyone order any eggs other than in an omelet-- nor did I realize that they even served hamburgers. The only things I ever see anyone order are disaster or loretta sandwiches and of course, omelets. (My favorite is the loretta with no onions. Those onions stick with you all day, so I avoid them.) I think you should give Sarkis another chance and order either a disaster or loretta a sandwich. They're deelish. Oh, and they also have the coldest Cokes in the world. Mmm.
  • Post #16 - November 20th, 2004, 11:19 pm
    Post #16 - November 20th, 2004, 11:19 pm Post #16 - November 20th, 2004, 11:19 pm
    Hi Nancyd

    I'm glad you have delurked and joined the conversation! Welcome!

    Your comment on our choices is interesting. Until I read Gary's post, I had planned to get the Disaster sandwich. When I ordered eggs, the manager immediately jumped to the conclusion I wanted scrambled eggs. I quickly corrected him, though I really wondered why he thought that. Maybe they have eggs already blended for their omelette, so it is the path of greatest convenience? I don't know. I would be willing to return to at least try the Loretta, since you and several others seem to have such fondness for it.

    I did see a couple eating the omelettes. They were not really traditional omelettes where the filling is between the eggs. Rather it was the ingrediants mixed with the eggs and cooked together. A different approach though I am sure it is quite good.

    Ronnie - I'm sorry for the sad history you now associate with the place. I'd be glad to meet you there for lunch sometime.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #17 - November 21st, 2004, 11:31 am
    Post #17 - November 21st, 2004, 11:31 am Post #17 - November 21st, 2004, 11:31 am
    Cathy2 wrote:Ronnie - I'm sorry for the sad history you now associate with the place. I'd be glad to meet you there for lunch sometime.

    Thanks Cathy, for the offer. I'm actually moving my office to HP at the end of the month, so if not Sarkis, certainly somewhere.

    I'm also going to start watching the Events Calendar forum more closely.

    Take care,

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #18 - November 21st, 2004, 2:35 pm
    Post #18 - November 21st, 2004, 2:35 pm Post #18 - November 21st, 2004, 2:35 pm
    I always thought of Sarki's more for the atmosphere than the food. I mean, you really have to be a lousy cook to screw up breakfast. Conversely, there's not much you can do with breakfast to make it a destination place. Maybe if we're talking fancy waffles or pancakes, but surely not eggs.

    But Sarki was a goof-ball and he made the trek worthwhile. I first went there 30 years ago and he was a whack-job then. If he's longer really associated with the place I can't imagine any reason to go out of my way to go there.
  • Post #19 - November 21st, 2004, 8:34 pm
    Post #19 - November 21st, 2004, 8:34 pm Post #19 - November 21st, 2004, 8:34 pm
    Sarkis is one of those places I went to a long time ago, just once, and had a memorable meal, mostly for the atmosphere. Standing waiting enlessly, as I remember, while Sarki entertained and abused. I seem to recall him saying something like, "what make difference to me?" in response to most questions. I liked that, and have used a variation to that for all these years (probably more than 20).

    I drive by Sarkis little island every couple of months and think about going back, but as I have remarked before, there is something about waiting in line to be fed food I could pretty easily replicate at home that does not appeal. Plus, I am rarely looking for breakfast in the northern suburbs.

    I will go back sometime though and try a Loretta, and disaster. Thanks for the updated info.
    d
    Feeling (south) loopy
  • Post #20 - February 4th, 2008, 10:31 pm
    Post #20 - February 4th, 2008, 10:31 pm Post #20 - February 4th, 2008, 10:31 pm
    I finally made it to sarkis and was lucky enough to go with a north side native who was able to extol the entire story of Sarkis.

    The place certainly has character and I am glad to have eaten there but I can't really recommend the place based on the food.

    As discussed the omelette's are not the traditional variety and while the portions are large the prices are not cheap. The disaster sausage would probably be pretty good after a night of getting bent but at 8:00 on a school day it was a dry textured overly spiced piece of suspect mystery meat.

    The potatoes and buttered bread were good and the orange juice was excellent.

    If you are going to eat at sarkis I would recommend a contingency just in case you arrive to find the small space overflowing.
    “Statistics show that of those who contract the habit of eating, very few survive.”
    George Bernard Shaw, Irish playwright (1856-1950)
  • Post #21 - February 4th, 2008, 10:41 pm
    Post #21 - February 4th, 2008, 10:41 pm Post #21 - February 4th, 2008, 10:41 pm
    I've always favored the ham Loretta. They under cook the onions, though.

    I think the Disaster is tasty but it repeats on me to death.Ugh.
  • Post #22 - February 4th, 2008, 11:01 pm
    Post #22 - February 4th, 2008, 11:01 pm Post #22 - February 4th, 2008, 11:01 pm
    I like the Jeff's Special Grilled Cheese sammy, which also boasts a fried egg and bacon.

    Disasters are definitely great . . . going down, at least. :wink:

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #23 - February 5th, 2008, 10:57 am
    Post #23 - February 5th, 2008, 10:57 am Post #23 - February 5th, 2008, 10:57 am
    We have been to Sarkis a few times over the years and frankly we just don't get it. It is a local place that is an institution for those who grew up/went to school near the place. These are the folks who rave about it. The owner is super friendly but the food is so-so. We really want to like the place as it is close but we keep driving past.
    What disease did cured ham actually have?
  • Post #24 - February 5th, 2008, 6:41 pm
    Post #24 - February 5th, 2008, 6:41 pm Post #24 - February 5th, 2008, 6:41 pm
    Twenty years ago, I was a regular at Sarkis. Nowadays, I go once a year, during the Loyola Thanksgiving Hockey tournament down the road. It is most definitely a welcome event for a guy who staged a loretta eating contest back in high school.

    Once a year is plenty for me. I know it sounds funny, but I don't think the place ever recovered from the health department shutdown many years ago.

    I'm glad you told me what the special grilled cheese is, I'll have to remember it my next time. Couldn't figure why a grilled cheese would be over 5 bucks!
  • Post #25 - February 5th, 2008, 10:00 pm
    Post #25 - February 5th, 2008, 10:00 pm Post #25 - February 5th, 2008, 10:00 pm
    fearlessfitz wrote:I'm glad you told me what the special grilled cheese is, I'll have to remember it my next time. Couldn't figure why a grilled cheese would be over 5 bucks!


    If you are a Sark-o-phile from way back you will remember that, according to Sark, everything cost $5.00.
  • Post #26 - February 5th, 2008, 10:03 pm
    Post #26 - February 5th, 2008, 10:03 pm Post #26 - February 5th, 2008, 10:03 pm
    iblock9 wrote:
    fearlessfitz wrote:I'm glad you told me what the special grilled cheese is, I'll have to remember it my next time. Couldn't figure why a grilled cheese would be over 5 bucks!


    If you are a Sark-o-phile from way back you will remember that, according to Sark, everything cost $5.00.

    LOL . . . including orders of hash browns, cans of pop and extra slices of cheese!

    :lol: (j/k, of course)

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #27 - April 22nd, 2008, 6:38 am
    Post #27 - April 22nd, 2008, 6:38 am Post #27 - April 22nd, 2008, 6:38 am
    LTH,

    Breakfast at Sarkis is a blunt instrument, a taste bud dissolving blast of meat, grease, cheese, spice, grease, salt, crisp, egg and more cheese. Sometimes you're in the mood, that morning I wasn't. Should have gone to La Peep for wheat germ pancakes.

    Sarkis
    Image

    Sarkis Special w/hash browns and Disaster Sausage
    Image

    Hash browns were tasty, if a little oily, but the sausage was a bit dry and I overdosed on cheese, both in omelet and on disaster sausage, early in the game.

    Grill @ Sarkis
    Image

    I did get a chuckle, fellow breezes in orders a "Vegetarian (omelet) with bacon" No one blinked an eye. :)

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #28 - April 22nd, 2008, 7:50 am
    Post #28 - April 22nd, 2008, 7:50 am Post #28 - April 22nd, 2008, 7:50 am
    There was a period in time, about 20 years ago, before my kids were born, when I had breakfast at Sarkis' about 4 times a week, very early in the morning. Sometimes I'd be waiting when Sark himself would open up at 6AM.

    In that tiny place, at that early hour, the place was magic & the patrons were classic. Joe, the retiree. Marcy, the cashier. Myself. Jerry, the barter man & NFL referee. No students or screaming girls waiting to be manhandled by Sarkis. Just a quiet oasis where the smell of coffee was strong & the sizzle on the grill loud.

    Conversation was inane & pertinent at the same time. One memorable Monday morning, the day after Charles Martin of the Packers bodyslammed Jim McMahon at Soldier Field, Jerry walked in and got a standing (well, actually sitting) ovation simply for doing the right thing.

    And I really got used to the food. Sark made a damn good omelette, searing the veggies in a little oil before throwing in the eggs, a practice I follow to this day.

    Fond memories, to be sure.
  • Post #29 - April 24th, 2008, 9:40 am
    Post #29 - April 24th, 2008, 9:40 am Post #29 - April 24th, 2008, 9:40 am
    iblock9 wrote:
    fearlessfitz wrote:I'm glad you told me what the special grilled cheese is, I'll have to remember it my next time. Couldn't figure why a grilled cheese would be over 5 bucks!


    If you are a Sark-o-phile from way back you will remember that, according to Sark, everything cost $5.00.


    that was always part of the charm. I always ordered the same thing (2 disasters, hash browns, and coke) and I swear the price was never the same. Sark or Santiago would always think about it for a second or two and blurt out some number, but never the same number.
  • Post #30 - February 13th, 2009, 10:39 pm
    Post #30 - February 13th, 2009, 10:39 pm Post #30 - February 13th, 2009, 10:39 pm
    iblock9 wrote:
    Rene G wrote:Overall I liked the Chuck Wagon and particularly enjoyed some of the menu names. I'm a bit of a sucker for that sort of thing (hence my interest in the Big Baby). Are there any other places in the north suburbs that serve a Losh?


    ReneG,
    I am glad you liked the Chuck Wagon. We used to ride our bikes there when we were kids. That grill has 35+ years of seasoning on it which I think adds to the deliciousness factor. I hope you tried the Niki as it is, IMHO, the defining sandwich at the Chuck Wagon.

    You might be interested to try the sandwiches at Sarkis, an institution in Northwest Evanston. Both the Disaster and the Lorretta are long time cult favorites. Just ask any kid who grew up on the North Shore from 1975-present. EVERYONE cut class to go visit with Sarkis. The disaster is a sausage sandwich and a Lorretta is a modified ham and cheese (or bacon and cheese in the case of the Bacon Lorretta). Sarkis was a real character but he sold the restaurant about 10 years ago and the rumor is that he has since passed away. This is however, untrue, as he was recently spotted at the Northfield Starbucks by a friend of mine who snapped a cell phone photo. The food is still pretty much the same and if you grew up with it, you are a fan of the Sark!

    Sarkis Restaurant
    2632 Gross Point Rd
    Evanston, IL 60201-4965


    I grew up in Lincoln Park but I did go to Loyola for 2 years from 96-98 and that was right before Sarkis sold the place and I was frequent guest during 1st and 2nd periods. He really had an affection for the girls. I too had heard he passed but thats great to know that hes not only alive but drinks at the local Starbucks. Sounds like he went Hollywood after selling the place. I also remember a real character who owned the Chuck Wagon around then, most likely the original owner, I want to say his name was George but I'm not sure. The Nikki special, disaster and the 30's style almost steamed triple cheese from the DQ on Lake were my three go to eats back then. They all remain virtually the same although the sausage patty on the disaster isn't nearly as tasty and well seasoned as it used to be so now I lean towards a bacon loretta when I get a chance to stop in.

    Image
    Disaster sandwich and hash browns with cheese from Sarkis

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