LTH Home

Favorite Chicago Restaurants and Fast food from the past

Favorite Chicago Restaurants and Fast food from the past
  • Forum HomePost Reply BackTop
     Page 1 of 12
  • Favorite Chicago Restaurants and Fast food from the past

    Post #1 - July 31st, 2008, 1:10 am
    Post #1 - July 31st, 2008, 1:10 am Post #1 - July 31st, 2008, 1:10 am
    Here are some of my favorites over time...including some that still are around and others long since closed for business. I guess they aren't "classic" but they were memorable for me:

    Italian - Slicker Sam's in Melrose park
    The pizza was a thicker crust, but was not the belly busting overdone cheese bomb that many now have adopted as the Chicago style deep dish. No, the Slicker pizza was light on cheese and had a delightful and light tomato sauce. The chalk board menu had dungeness crab which would attract many Japanese businessmen coming in to do business in Chicago and the best conch or scungilli salad (always misspelled as "scongil salad" on the chalk board menu).
    Fast Food - The original Al's Beef on Tayor - They now have franchises, but the original place on Taylor is still the best, in my opinion (went there after the Sox Opening day and it was still very good). We used to go to Mama Tish's a few blocks West on Taylor for Italian ice after a beef at Al's but I did not look for it when we were there.
    Russells Barbecue in Elmwood Park- We used to go there after a day at Kiddieland for the pulled pork or pulled beef barbecue sandwich. Have not been back there in decades but I heard it is still open.
    Burger and Beer - Come Back Inn (while I am mentioning Melrose Park)
    Anyone who ever went there with me loved the place. The outside had a large polar bear in a circulating glass cylinder. Inside the place was dark with a stamped concrete floor where you were encouraged to throw peanut shells from whole peanuts which they put on every table. The famous fireplace had an enormous see through opening and floor to cathedral ceiling boulders with a deer head mounted on ones side and the deer hind on the other. The burgers were the best and the atmosphere was so wonderful you just wanted to stay and have a great time long after your meal.
    French - Cafe Bernard This place may still be around and if so, I trust that is still as good as it has been over the years. I always enjoyed the escargot, the duck as well as a dessert of white chocolate mousse with mixed berries.
    The Bakery- Beef wellington was smashing there.
    Greek - The original Greek islands and Parthenon were the best places and are still there, although Greek islands was originally across the street on Halsted from its current locale. Love the gyros and tzatsiki, the sea bass, taramosalata, cold octopus salad and loaves and loaves of Greek bread with sesame seeds..
    Mexican - La Hacienda Del Sol This place was on the corner of Lincoln Park West and Armitage . The owner knew how to marinate and cook flank steak so that it was black on the outside yet tender and moist on the inside. It was the best bistec i have ever had in the US or Mexico, I am not kidding it was that good. The owner featured that steak in a few dishes. It was served by itself in a dinner or as the "Fondue Hacienda" cut into strips under a flaming fondue of melted cheese to dip the steak into. Awesome and never duplicated in quality or presentation in any Mexican restaurant about town as far as I know.
    Indian - Bengal Lancer's This was on the second floor of a three flat on Clark street just North of Belden. You would go up dark carpeted stairs and open a door like you were going into someone's old apartment. Inside there were only a dozen or so tables in an atmosphere that was just right for indulging in the flavors that Mr. and Mrs. Dixit used to create. The aloo vada, and the lamb biryani were among many fantastic entrees that they published in a book entitled, of course :"The Bengal Lancer's cookbook" . Their famous Pimm's Cup served in a metal stein with mint sprig and cucumber slice was refreshing with the spicy cuisine.
    Polynesian - Kontiki Ports Entry on Lower Wacker. Great Mai Tai cocktails and after those I don't recall much...
    German - The Berghoff - Very good schnitzel and creamed spinach. I also liked going to lunch in the adjacent bar where they had a chef standing there to carve corned beef for your sandwich.
    Ice Cream - The Original Rainbow Cone on Western - Still going strong. You have not lived until you down a rainbow cone on a hot summer evening. Slices of Palmer House, New York cherry, Pistachio, Strawberry ice cream and Orange Sherbert slapped into one memorable cone.
    Melody Lane - on 87th - we used to go there as kids for parties and partake in large ice cream dishes, not up to Rainbow's ice cream quality, , but they were just enormous - large enough for the whole gang to share.
    and as some more memories return:
    The Half Shell - Don't know if that is still around but it was (still is ?) in the garden level of an old three flat on Fullerton and Orchard, I believe. The place was basically a basement (concrete floors and all) with a bar and a few tables scattered around, but we used to go there for a salad with romaine, sweet onions, and an excellent mustard salad dressing (I think they used Coop's mustard) and then the best frog legs I have had.
    Helen's Olde Lantern A classic old restaurant in Blue Island. Does anyone remember Helen?
    Mama Louisa's This lady used to work at Lou Malnatti's I believe, and still serves up a very respectable version of Lou's deep dish pizza in a small unassuming place on Cicero in Crestwood.
    The Dill Pickle This was a great downtown Deli on Plymouth Court, right next to the old hotel where they shot the scene with the Penguin in the original Blues Brothers.
    Great corned beef on rye with of course, a dill pickle for lunch.
    Tad's Steakhouse This was on Randolph, I believe, in the Loop. Wow, this is really going back to my early days when my mother took us shopping downtown. They served a Bonanza style steak with garlic bread and baked potato for some outrageously cheap price. As a treat later we would have a shake on the round stools at State Street Walgreens counter.
    The Magic Pan This was a franchise creperie that was around for a few years. My favorite locations were the one in the loop and the one in the Oakbrook shopping center. The mandarin orange with almond salad was great and so were the crepes. I wonder why such a nice franchise shut its doors, but, like some of these other places, we can only imagine why they may have closed for business.
    Last edited by alottatumor on August 3rd, 2008, 12:07 am, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #2 - July 31st, 2008, 6:49 am
    Post #2 - July 31st, 2008, 6:49 am Post #2 - July 31st, 2008, 6:49 am
    As I posted when it came out on Valentine's Day:

    nsxtasy wrote:There's a very touching photo tribute in today's Tribune to restaurants that are no longer with us but have left something indelible in our hearts. There are photos of the Bakery, Le Perroquet, Gordon, and Cafe Provencal, among others - places that, for many of us, brightened our lives with creative fine dining before it became as popular as it is today.

    Long Gone Restaurants
    Our Valetines (sic) to restaurants we truly miss.

    The photo tribute is still available on the Tribune website. Click here.
  • Post #3 - July 31st, 2008, 7:29 am
    Post #3 - July 31st, 2008, 7:29 am Post #3 - July 31st, 2008, 7:29 am
    alottatumor wrote:Polynesian - Kontiki Ports Entry on Lower Wacker. Great Mai Tai cocktails and after those I don't recall much...

    Alottatumor,

    Terrific list, fun to read, even for a transplant* such as myself.

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    *25+ years living in Chicago and my wife, a native, still considers me a Wisconsinite. :shock:
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #4 - July 31st, 2008, 8:03 am
    Post #4 - July 31st, 2008, 8:03 am Post #4 - July 31st, 2008, 8:03 am
    Ice Cream - The Original Rainbow Cone on Western - Still going strong. You have not lived until you down a rainbow cone on a hot summer evening. Slices of Palmer House, New York cherry, Pistachio, Strawberry ice cream and Orange Sherbert slapped into one memorable cone.


    Mmmmmm...Rainbow cone! One of my favorite things about summer.
  • Post #5 - July 31st, 2008, 9:42 pm
    Post #5 - July 31st, 2008, 9:42 pm Post #5 - July 31st, 2008, 9:42 pm
    I'm not sure how classic some of these are...but I remember them fondly from my childhood.

    The Buffalo at Irving and Pulaski. It was a must stop after Cubs games in the 70s. Great old marble counter. I remember feeling about 2 feet tall, but given that I was probably only 7 or 8 years old, I wasn't too far off.

    The Indian Trail in Winnetka. This was a real special occasion place for us as kids. We especially loved to go on Christmas Day or Eve because even as Jews, it's nice to listen to some carols and guzzle the (non-alcoholic) wassail.

    European Spot in Wheeling(?). God did my famiily LOVE this place. I am not sure what type of Euro this was - vaguely Eastern -- maybe Hungarian/Polish/Austrian/Czech. The soups were all delicious - dill was the herb of choice -- and the portions were enormous and cheap. I think a full meal was about $4-7 which included soup, salad, entree, drink and dessert. Ah, the "spot."

    I dearly miss the Claim Company formerly of Northbrook for the mysteriously delicious Claim sauce, which was good on everything, and the towering candy sundaes. When I was abroad 20 years ago in college all I could dream about was coming home and having a Motherlode and a Reese's Sundae to wash it down. Claim Company first introduced me to the salad bar, and also the most amazing appetizers (now quite common) - fried cheese, nachos and potato skins.

    I also recall enjoying the Wimpy's downtown, and Arthur Treacher's on Addison.
    "You should eat!"
  • Post #6 - August 1st, 2008, 7:26 am
    Post #6 - August 1st, 2008, 7:26 am Post #6 - August 1st, 2008, 7:26 am
    For nostalgia buffs:

    viewtopic.php?f=14&t=150&hilit=fritzel%27s
    "The fork with two prongs is in use in northern Europe. In England, they’re armed with a steel trident, a fork with three prongs. In France we have a fork with four prongs; it’s the height of civilization." Eugene Briffault (1846)
  • Post #7 - August 1st, 2008, 3:14 pm
    Post #7 - August 1st, 2008, 3:14 pm Post #7 - August 1st, 2008, 3:14 pm
    I spent a lot of time in and around Melrose Park, and frequented Slicker Sam's and Come Back Inn - and loved 'em both. Teodori's (a/k/a "Lefty's" to the "in crowd") was a gem, also - great pizza and just about everything else on the menu - especially the yearly special of stuffed Anaheim peppers; it was over on Division St. Tom's Steakhouse always seemed to be a good choice, over on North Avenue. Russell's at North & Thatcher in Elmwood Park has always been my favorite choice for a pulled pork sandwich, and I love the sauce - melt-in-your-mouth pork. Oh, let's not forget Harlo Grill on North Avenue, also in Melrose Park.

    The original Al's Beef on Taylor St. was a great spot, but I don't consider it very good anymore; average is how I describe it. I first started going there in 1969-70, when I lived at Taylor & May.

    The Bakery was a restaurant I frequented once a month, back in the day. I loved the place.

    The Parthenon is still my go to Greek restaurant. I almost always order the lamb chops. And, yes - the saganaki.

    Berghoff was a place I always thought was highly over-rated; not sorry to see it gone.

    I've never been impressed by Rainbow Cone. Though, when I'd have spare time on my hands as a kid I'd walk there from 69th & Ashland, where I lived (and, therefore, there must have been some redeeming value!). Anybody remember the name of the ice cream parlor that was on 87th St., east of Ashland Ave. - in the 60's?
  • Post #8 - August 1st, 2008, 6:40 pm
    Post #8 - August 1st, 2008, 6:40 pm Post #8 - August 1st, 2008, 6:40 pm
    Berghoff was a place I always thought was highly over-rated; not sorry to see it gone.


    ....and the thing is, it's not even gone. The so-called "closing" was just a move to bust the waiters' union at the resto, one that the Chicago media chose to wildly overpublicize. I am sorry I bought into it, and I will never set foot in the place again. Hell, anyone can make better sauerbraten, anyway. Seriously.
  • Post #9 - August 1st, 2008, 6:51 pm
    Post #9 - August 1st, 2008, 6:51 pm Post #9 - August 1st, 2008, 6:51 pm
    [quote="alottatumor"]Here are some of my favorites over time...including some that still are around and others long since closed for business.

    Mexican - La Hacienda Del Sol

    Around 1985 we took my mother in law, who was visiting from Nothern Ireland, to La Hacienda del Sol for dinner (it was our very favorite at the time). One look at the menu and she declared there was nothing she could eat. The waiter said he would take care of her and brought a sampler plate and she loved it. She ended up exchanging names and addresses with several of the staff and corresponded with them for years and the hostess ended up in Armagh for a few days and stayed with her. I have very fond memories of that restaurant, and indeed that time in my life. Ah youth!
  • Post #10 - August 1st, 2008, 8:41 pm
    Post #10 - August 1st, 2008, 8:41 pm Post #10 - August 1st, 2008, 8:41 pm
    I remember the Stouffer's hotel? on State or Wabash near Randolph? It's been 30 years probably, but I used to go there for lunch with my grandmother. They had the best tomato soup ever, and I've been searching for one like it for the last 30 years.

    Also, anyone recall Vosnos'? Just talking about that with my mom, I don't remember much about it other than it was a fancy place for a suburban kid.
  • Post #11 - August 3rd, 2008, 12:17 am
    Post #11 - August 3rd, 2008, 12:17 am Post #11 - August 3rd, 2008, 12:17 am
    Missus H wrote:Around 1985 we took my mother in law, who was visiting from Nothern Ireland, to La Hacienda del Sol for dinner (it was our very favorite at the time). One look at the menu and she declared there was nothing she could eat. The waiter said he would take care of her and brought a sampler plate and she loved it. She ended up exchanging names and addresses with several of the staff and corresponded with them for years and the hostess ended up in Armagh for a few days and stayed with her. I have very fond memories of that restaurant, and indeed that time in my life. Ah youth!

    ------
    Thanks for sharing that. Those are the kind of experiences that seldom happen in this age where franchise restaurants dominate. I guess some of what was special was perceived that way because of our youth.
  • Post #12 - August 3rd, 2008, 12:20 am
    Post #12 - August 3rd, 2008, 12:20 am Post #12 - August 3rd, 2008, 12:20 am
    sujormik wrote:Also, anyone recall Vosnos'? Just talking about that with my mom, I don't remember much about it other than it was a fancy place for a suburban kid.


    I assume you are not talking about the now closed diner at Montrose and Elston? Where was your Vosnos?

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #13 - August 3rd, 2008, 2:16 pm
    Post #13 - August 3rd, 2008, 2:16 pm Post #13 - August 3rd, 2008, 2:16 pm
    Franabanana wrote:The Indian Trail in Winnetka. This was a real special occasion place for us as kids. We especially loved to go on Christmas Day or Eve because even as Jews, it's nice to listen to some carols and guzzle the (non-alcoholic) wassail.


    Absolutely, and my family would even drop we kids off at the Christian Science Reading Room next door where the nice lady would watch us while they browsed the stores before dinner (and I would wonder why there were never any comics or other good stuff in this weird library.)

    On the same tea room note, I also miss San Pedro. The older I get, the more I think there was something to that old-fashioned dining concept of a full meal including dessert in smaller-than-you-find-today portions.

    >>Brent
    "Yankee bean soup, cole slaw and tuna surprise."
  • Post #14 - August 3rd, 2008, 4:44 pm
    Post #14 - August 3rd, 2008, 4:44 pm Post #14 - August 3rd, 2008, 4:44 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:
    sujormik wrote:Also, anyone recall Vosnos'? Just talking about that with my mom, I don't remember much about it other than it was a fancy place for a suburban kid.


    I assume you are not talking about the now closed diner at Montrose and Elston? Where was your Vosnos?

    Regards,



    You are correct. This was at the corner of Dempster and Waukegan in Morton Grove. It's a fruit market now, I just remember low lights, velvet chairs, fancy waiters. Mind you this is 40 years ago so my memory could be a little suspect, but it was definitely NOT a diner in the city. LOL
  • Post #15 - August 3rd, 2008, 4:58 pm
    Post #15 - August 3rd, 2008, 4:58 pm Post #15 - August 3rd, 2008, 4:58 pm
    perhaps this thread should be merged with All the old familiar places ?
  • Post #16 - August 4th, 2008, 10:21 am
    Post #16 - August 4th, 2008, 10:21 am Post #16 - August 4th, 2008, 10:21 am
    I also grew up in Melrose Park. Does anybody recall Butch's Beef at 14th & Lake just across the street from the now missing Cock Robin's? Butch's was a small stand with just stand-up counters. What was unusual was Butch used to add a touch of BBQ sauce to His Italian Beef, which gave it a bit of redness to the color & sweetness to the taste. He also had dogs & fries that were almost identical to Gene & Jude's, which made this at least a once a week stop when I was in high school. Last time I was in the old neighborhood, I noticed a new Butch's beef further west at approx 21st & Lake, but I didn't get a chance to try it.
    It's tough being a Bears fan in Cheesehead land!
  • Post #17 - August 4th, 2008, 12:26 pm
    Post #17 - August 4th, 2008, 12:26 pm Post #17 - August 4th, 2008, 12:26 pm
    Gordon's (sigh) - I loved that place, so many great special occasion meals there, fab food & service.

    I used to love Mare too, in the space now occupied by Singha.
  • Post #18 - August 4th, 2008, 10:45 pm
    Post #18 - August 4th, 2008, 10:45 pm Post #18 - August 4th, 2008, 10:45 pm
    Used to love the cheeseburgers at Reds at 95th & Western (am I remembering the right location??)

    Also Don & Angie's pizza in Glen Ellyn (really WAY back).

    Already I miss the Homestead on North Avenue.

    And what was the bar/restaurant in the far south suburbs that had all the coin-operated gizmos?

    Yah, yah, I'm really dating myself.
    50sGuy
  • Post #19 - August 4th, 2008, 11:35 pm
    Post #19 - August 4th, 2008, 11:35 pm Post #19 - August 4th, 2008, 11:35 pm
    50sGuy wrote:Used to love the cheeseburgers at Reds at 95th & Western (am I remembering the right location??)


    If its the Reds that had the sign with the red hot dog morphed into a dog...yes I remember this from way back when I was maybe 10-11.

    My favorite from the past are Glenn's that sat on Fullerton, a little less than a block west of the Walgreen's (1520 w. Fulerton)...they had the greasiest cheeseburgers for breakfast.

    Demon Dog's (under the fulerton el stop) as good of hot dogs as Gene & Judes and Jimmy's...same style

    Lindo Mexico on Lincoln ave...The first one and not the second that reopened. I remember a great atmosphere and loving Mexican food at a very young age.

    There was a rib joint that sat on Clybourn near Cabrini that was really good way back.
  • Post #20 - August 5th, 2008, 4:55 am
    Post #20 - August 5th, 2008, 4:55 am Post #20 - August 5th, 2008, 4:55 am
    Da Beef wrote:There was a rib joint that sat on Clybourn near Cabrini that was really good way back.


    I think it was called Farmer Brown's.
  • Post #21 - August 5th, 2008, 6:19 am
    Post #21 - August 5th, 2008, 6:19 am Post #21 - August 5th, 2008, 6:19 am
    Da Beef wrote:There was a rib joint that sat on Clybourn near Cabrini that was really good way back.

    Edith's :( My former favorite take-out spot.
  • Post #22 - August 5th, 2008, 6:25 am
    Post #22 - August 5th, 2008, 6:25 am Post #22 - August 5th, 2008, 6:25 am
    Da Beef wrote:There was a rib joint that sat on Clybourn near Cabrini that was really good way back.

    midas wrote:I think it was called Farmer Brown's.

    Midas,

    You are correct sir, Farmers Brown's was at 1267 N Clybourn. Edith's, a respectable BBQ joint with good fries, a few blocks North on Clybourn.

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    Farmer Brown Bar B Q (Closed)
    1267 N Clybourn Ave
    Chicago, IL 60610

    Edith's Bar-B-Q (Closed)
    1863 N Clybourn
    Chicago, IL 60610
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #23 - August 5th, 2008, 8:24 am
    Post #23 - August 5th, 2008, 8:24 am Post #23 - August 5th, 2008, 8:24 am
    50sGuy wrote:Used to love the cheeseburgers at Reds at 95th & Western (am I remembering the right location??).


    Reds was on 111st just west of Western ( Artesian) . It closed and was torn down several years ago after a unsuccessful fight between the owner "Red" and the Beverly Area Planning Association (BAPA). Red had a huge petition signing but he threw in the towel after a few months. At the time he said that he wanted to re-open somewhere else in the neighborhood but it never happened. The Beverly Arts Center now stands there.
    :cry:

    Janson's, another famous Beverly hamburger/hot dog drive in still stands at 99th and Western.

    Image


    Snyder's Red Hot's (related to the Janson family?) was across the street.They closed many, many years ago.
    :cry:
    Hot Dogs, Hamburgers, Spaghetti and Meatballs! (Beauregard Burnside III)
  • Post #24 - August 5th, 2008, 11:28 am
    Post #24 - August 5th, 2008, 11:28 am Post #24 - August 5th, 2008, 11:28 am
    This may elicit groans, but as a youngster in the seventies, there wasn't a more exciting birthday meal than the one held at Farrell's. It was a sensory overload with the sirens, the drums, the birthday dessert being run through the restaurant and into the mall and back. I know my parents detested the experience, but among my sibs and I, a birthday wasn't complete without a trip to Farrell's.

    I know they were a mall staple/franchise back then, but my fond memories are from the Woodfield location.
  • Post #25 - August 29th, 2008, 10:39 pm
    Post #25 - August 29th, 2008, 10:39 pm Post #25 - August 29th, 2008, 10:39 pm
    A lot of these places were just fabuloso, others may have been things that have nostalgic appeal.
    Speaking of which, someone told me that Berghoff's was reopened , at least the bar portion. Has anyone been there to confirm?
  • Post #26 - August 29th, 2008, 10:45 pm
    Post #26 - August 29th, 2008, 10:45 pm Post #26 - August 29th, 2008, 10:45 pm
    Edith's, a respectable BBQ joint with good fries


    I beg to differ.
    Watch Sky Full of Bacon, the Chicago food HD podcast!
    New episode: Soil, Corn, Cows and Cheese
    Watch the Reader's James Beard Award-winning Key Ingredient here.
  • Post #27 - August 29th, 2008, 11:35 pm
    Post #27 - August 29th, 2008, 11:35 pm Post #27 - August 29th, 2008, 11:35 pm
    Mike G wrote:
    Edith's, a respectable BBQ joint with good fries


    I beg to differ.

    In the couple of years prior to her closing, when Edith was 122 or 123 years old, the food, including fries, suffered. Back in the mid eighties, when the oil was clean and Edith was feeling spry, BBQ, fries and stories from herself were a treat.

    (Closed)
    Edith's Bar-B-Q
    1863 N Clybourn
    Chicago, IL
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #28 - August 29th, 2008, 11:50 pm
    Post #28 - August 29th, 2008, 11:50 pm Post #28 - August 29th, 2008, 11:50 pm
    Well, I suppose we'll never know, but my memory of that machine was that it was a distinctly 60s, space age innovation. (Which I suppose doesn't strictly prove it came to Edith's in that time period, though it seems an odd addition later on.) Anyway, it certainly made an impression on me, right up there with the microwaved shake among early, horrific Chicago food experiences.
    Watch Sky Full of Bacon, the Chicago food HD podcast!
    New episode: Soil, Corn, Cows and Cheese
    Watch the Reader's James Beard Award-winning Key Ingredient here.
  • Post #29 - August 30th, 2008, 12:19 pm
    Post #29 - August 30th, 2008, 12:19 pm Post #29 - August 30th, 2008, 12:19 pm
    I am haunted by a pizza place that I went to in my high school days in Palatine, IL.

    Does anyone remember Barro's Pizza? I have a lousy memory of where it was (I think it was on Dundee, but my memory of those times centers more around Woodfield Mall and hanging with friends), but my memory of the pizza is very clear. It was thick crust pizza but not pan pizza. It my head it was the perfect pizza (at least for me). Chewy and crusty but a soft chew -- cheese was often brown to the point of almost burnt but not quite burnt. I remember a delicious sauce -- a little spicy and oregano-y and i remember excellent sausage and pepperoni and a lot of it. I have tried to find a similiar pizza for the last 20 years but to no avail, alas. It's not NY style...it's not Chicago style, but it was damn good pizza.
  • Post #30 - September 1st, 2008, 6:09 pm
    Post #30 - September 1st, 2008, 6:09 pm Post #30 - September 1st, 2008, 6:09 pm
    There's a thread about La Choza upon Paulina just north of Howard.That was my main intro to Mexican food when I first moved to Chicago in 1977.Then there was Cocina Mexicana on Webster just west of the el tracks. It was incredibly good and really cheap, closed around 1990. Someone mentioned the Bengal Lancers, an extraordinary Indian place just south of Fullerton on Clark. RIP. And nearby was Hashikin,a good Japanese place that is notable not just because it was the place of the first date with the lady who was to become Mrs.Trpt some 23 years ago. Still married, 22nd anniversary next Saturday.
    trpt2345

Contact

About

Team

Advertize

Close

Chat

Articles

Guide

Events

more