LTH Home

Christkindlmarktimbißbude [Christkindlmarkt]

Christkindlmarktimbißbude [Christkindlmarkt]
  • Forum HomePost Reply BackTop
    Page 4 of 6
  • Post #91 - December 1st, 2006, 11:42 am
    Post #91 - December 1st, 2006, 11:42 am Post #91 - December 1st, 2006, 11:42 am
    That's pretty easy to remedy. Antonius knows the way. What was the good German place in California? (Don't tell me it was the Terminator's Aurtrian place, please.)
  • Post #92 - December 1st, 2006, 12:03 pm
    Post #92 - December 1st, 2006, 12:03 pm Post #92 - December 1st, 2006, 12:03 pm
    scatteredshadows wrote:The few places I've tried in Chicago have been mediocre at best...


    Please let us know where you've been and what you didn't like about them. I believe there are some very good German offerings in town.

    Best,
    Michael
  • Post #93 - December 1st, 2006, 12:26 pm
    Post #93 - December 1st, 2006, 12:26 pm Post #93 - December 1st, 2006, 12:26 pm
    scatteredshadows wrote: I haven't had really good German food of any kind since I lived in California. The few places I've tried in Chicago have been mediocre at best...


    Knock-your-socks-off German is not to be found here or much of anywhere in these United States, but we have a few places that are great in their own right:

    My personal favourite is Laschet's Inn, which is a very satisfying restaurant with a set of well executed basic German dishes and a great bar; various daily specials are offered: check their website. There's a lot about this place here:
    http://lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.php?p=35035#35035
    http://lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.php?p=23745#23745
    http://lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.php?p=31787#31787


    Just across the street and over a little is Resi's Bierstube which is an outstanding bar with a tiny but very efficient and successful kitchen. Resi's doesn't have its own thread but it should. Search on Resi's, though, and you find it mentioned in many individual posts in the various threads that discuss German restaurants around the region.

    Those two do the trick for me as places to get nice food, great beer on tap and not have to cook. I cook German food at home fairly often and if you do that, you should check out Hans' Delikatessen Meyer in Lincoln Square.

    Another restaurant you might want to check out is Glunz', though I haven't been there myself and so can offer no personal opinion on it:
    http://lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.php?p=2062#2062

    Regarding the Christmas market, JeffB is right in pointing out that a couple of great additions to the market that came in a few years back are now gone. Now, the main grub element is basic Imbiß-fare. There is some variability regarding quality, depending on traffic and time of day. The bratkartoffeln can be served up disappointingly underdone when they get slammed with business at lunch time, for example. But, as I said above, my lunch yesterday was great.

    Viel Spaß!
    Antonius


    Laschet's Inn
    2119 W. Irving Park Rd.
    773-478-7915

    Resi's Bierstube
    2034 W. Irving Park Rd.
    773-472-1749
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #94 - December 1st, 2006, 12:52 pm
    Post #94 - December 1st, 2006, 12:52 pm Post #94 - December 1st, 2006, 12:52 pm
    So is the KmWurst any good, or is it just long? I have some relatives coming in next weekend for the Nutcracker, and we usually hit the Markt after the matinee.

    I see they are having a St. Martin's parade for the Kindern next week (albeit 4 weeks late). I wonder if they will use real candles? As a child, I lived for several years in a town outside of Hamburg. One of my fondest memories of that time was St. Martin's day, parading through the darkened streets in the moonlight with a dangerously flammable paper lantern on the end of a stick (inevitably, a few of them would go up in flames). The parade started with sugar coated pretzels and ended with a bonfire. For a 7 year old kid, what's not to like? All these decades later, I still cannot get those inane songs out of my head. Laterne, Laterne, Sonne, Mond und Sterne....

    Anyhow, it might be a fun activity for those with kleinen ones.
  • Post #95 - December 1st, 2006, 1:15 pm
    Post #95 - December 1st, 2006, 1:15 pm Post #95 - December 1st, 2006, 1:15 pm
    d4v3 wrote:So is the KmWurst any good, or is it just long? I have some relatives coming in next weekend for the Nutcracker, and we usually hit the Markt after the matinee.


    If it's the same product as has appeared in years past, yes, the Plauen-guys' K-wurst is a good sausage with a nice little touch of spice.

    Antonius
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #96 - November 29th, 2007, 12:41 am
    Post #96 - November 29th, 2007, 12:41 am Post #96 - November 29th, 2007, 12:41 am
    So I guess this year's has started again. Anyone been yet?
  • Post #97 - November 29th, 2007, 7:39 am
    Post #97 - November 29th, 2007, 7:39 am Post #97 - November 29th, 2007, 7:39 am
    I was there last night after work. Lots of people on a mild evening, but without the lunchtime lines, so it was fun. The food looks pretty tame--more French fries and "German Hamburgers," but they also all have Leberkäse, which I don't remember from prior years.

    Mader's Restaurant from Milwaukee has a stand this year, and they have some interesting looking stuff, including liver dumpling soup and a sauerbrauten sandwich, that I look forward to trying.

    I think the quality and variety of craft booths may be up this year. I bought a lovely paper star light, and spent a lot of time looking over hand-made replicas of 19th century German nativities. The craftsman, who is selling them himself, uses the original porcelain molds and hand-paints them and installs them in various interesting-looking cases, often with lights. Some of them run close to $1000, and I wouldn't dispute that they're worth it.
  • Post #98 - November 29th, 2007, 9:12 am
    Post #98 - November 29th, 2007, 9:12 am Post #98 - November 29th, 2007, 9:12 am
    Thanks, Ann. By the way here's a list of the vendors for this year. It does look like there's less interesting stuff than in years past. I'll probably still check it out, though.
  • Post #99 - November 29th, 2007, 9:50 am
    Post #99 - November 29th, 2007, 9:50 am Post #99 - November 29th, 2007, 9:50 am
    Planning to check this out on Saturday, any idea how the weekend crowds are? Weather dependant? Thanks! I went last year for lunch during work and the lines were quite long.
  • Post #100 - November 29th, 2007, 11:18 am
    Post #100 - November 29th, 2007, 11:18 am Post #100 - November 29th, 2007, 11:18 am
    Last year I ordered the Leberkäse which they DID have there. Kinda like a big hunk of bologna... it seems prices on food are up slightly ($5 for 3 potatoe pancakes with applesauce) and the warez are up considerably. I couldn't just spending hundreds or thousands for a coocoo clock. I guess maybe the falling value of the dollar is raising the prices of the imports.

    Ann Fisher wrote:I was there last night after work. Lots of people on a mild evening, but without the lunchtime lines, so it was fun. The food looks pretty tame--more French fries and "German Hamburgers," but they also all have Leberkäse, which I don't remember from prior years.

    Mader's Restaurant from Milwaukee has a stand this year, and they have some interesting looking stuff, including liver dumpling soup and a sauerbrauten sandwich, that I look forward to trying.

    I think the quality and variety of craft booths may be up this year. I bought a lovely paper star light, and spent a lot of time looking over hand-made replicas of 19th century German nativities. The craftsman, who is selling them himself, uses the original porcelain molds and hand-paints them and installs them in various interesting-looking cases, often with lights. Some of them run close to $1000, and I wouldn't dispute that they're worth it.
  • Post #101 - November 29th, 2007, 11:48 am
    Post #101 - November 29th, 2007, 11:48 am Post #101 - November 29th, 2007, 11:48 am
    Thanks for the report on the Leberkäse, which I thought looked a lot like Spam. Think I'll take a pass.
  • Post #102 - November 29th, 2007, 3:46 pm
    Post #102 - November 29th, 2007, 3:46 pm Post #102 - November 29th, 2007, 3:46 pm
    We had the leberkase this year and last year, and it's quite tasty. Yes its a bit bologna-esque, (not spam like though) and good with the kraut and mustard. The schnitzel sandwich was also yummy. The gluhwine is good, but we were kind of annoyed that the mugs were practically identical to last years (we started collecting them since moving here) and that you can't walk around with alcohol outside the little interior area and they are quite militant about it. There seem to be less vendors overall, but I still think its worth going. We went on sunday nov 25th, shortly after it opened and it wasn't too crowded unless you wanted to see Santa, for which there was a long line.
    LO
  • Post #103 - December 12th, 2007, 7:36 pm
    Post #103 - December 12th, 2007, 7:36 pm Post #103 - December 12th, 2007, 7:36 pm
    I like simple, as in say, a slab of Swabian Spam, a hot dog steak, leberkase. I saw it sizzling there; it was kind of food lust at first sight.

    Image

    I know it don’t look like much.

    Image

    The kraut and senf bumped it up a lot. I had this sammie with gluvien, but should have had a beer, though I liked the gluvien just fine. Easy to please. I guess.
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #104 - December 12th, 2007, 11:34 pm
    Post #104 - December 12th, 2007, 11:34 pm Post #104 - December 12th, 2007, 11:34 pm
    I had a wonderful day last Friday showing around a soon-to-depart friend.

    In order:

    - a stop at Hot Doug's for a thuringer, a 'hot' encased meat and a wheelbarrow of duck fat fries.

    - after a trip to the Osaka Garden (beautiful, even in winter), refueling in Chinatown: cash from the ATM and tea, bear paw tofu and scallion pancakes from Double Li (companion thought that dry chili chicken would be too much, but we should not have avoided the spice. The tofu dish might be a good counterpoint to hot sichuan oil, but on its own, a bit bland. I need to go back and try board favorites)

    - a trip to the Blommer's outlet for some bulk bittersweet and chocolate covered cashews (not to mention tastings)

    - finally, ending up at Christkindlmarkt: We had just missed the lantern festival, but ample atmosphere was provided by the cheery, overpacked ornament shops and the towering Frankentree. Our repast was made up of kilometerwurst (a spicy, Hungarian favorite enjoyed in the flickering shadows of the Chabad Hanukkiah).

    Do not overlook sweets at Christkindlmarkt. We went to the marzipan/sweet stand round the corner from the epicenter of kilometerwurst. They had gingerbread that, well, actually remembered to include the ginger. It was cut into bite sized pieces and was pleasantly chewy inside.

    But, the star of the show were the hot sugared and cinnamoned pecans. I'm not picky about nuts, but when I saw some were just being taken out of the delicious goop and were busy steaming up the side of the tent I pointed and said "half a pound of whatever that is, please".

    I know that with Garrett's and other such establishments, Chicagoans are no strangers to freshly roasted or spiced nuts. But there is nothing like standing outside in a snow-draped square of global Christmas commerce and clutching the warm bag to your heart with the wafting aroma of sugar, spice and other things nice.

    For anyone in the area, I highly recommend some nuts.
  • Post #105 - December 13th, 2007, 12:03 am
    Post #105 - December 13th, 2007, 12:03 am Post #105 - December 13th, 2007, 12:03 am
    gastro gnome wrote:But, the star of the show were the hot sugared and cinnamoned pecans.


    From the Sweet Swabian, I assume?
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #106 - December 13th, 2007, 4:08 am
    Post #106 - December 13th, 2007, 4:08 am Post #106 - December 13th, 2007, 4:08 am
    I don't know about the food at the markt, but the smell of it just drives me crazy and make my mouth water with retro memories of my grandmother's kitchen. I think it is all the sausage, potatoes and sauerkraut cooking and mingling. Yum.
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #107 - December 13th, 2007, 11:46 am
    Post #107 - December 13th, 2007, 11:46 am Post #107 - December 13th, 2007, 11:46 am
    Try the reuben rolls at Mader's booth. They are like egg rolls, but stuffed with corned beef, swiss cheese and sauerkraut, and accompanied by russian dressing for dipping. At two for $5, not bad for the market (or the Loop in general).
  • Post #108 - December 13th, 2007, 5:30 pm
    Post #108 - December 13th, 2007, 5:30 pm Post #108 - December 13th, 2007, 5:30 pm
    should have had a beer, though I liked the gluvien just fine. Easy to please. I guess.


    I was at Laschett's the other afternoon and had a glass of Gluhwein - I'm assuming that's what you're talking about, David? I wonder if it's the same thing. It's good, although it's no glogg.
  • Post #109 - December 13th, 2007, 6:02 pm
    Post #109 - December 13th, 2007, 6:02 pm Post #109 - December 13th, 2007, 6:02 pm
    Karl wrote:
    should have had a beer, though I liked the gluvien just fine. Easy to please. I guess.


    I was at Laschett's the other afternoon and had a glass of Gluhwein - I'm assuming that's what you're talking about, David? I wonder if it's the same thing. It's good, although it's no glogg.


    Karl,

    You're probably right; I was going from memory, and it's likely spelled "gluhwein" (glow wine?).

    I mentioned gloog to a German woman I was sitting with, comparing it with gluhwein. "No," she sniffed, "Gluhwein is nothing like glogg, which has all kinds of cinnamon and raisins in it."

    Incidentally, I'm told gluhwein is available at Aldi, which is apparently a German store (I did not know that).

    Hammond
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #110 - December 13th, 2007, 7:44 pm
    Post #110 - December 13th, 2007, 7:44 pm Post #110 - December 13th, 2007, 7:44 pm
    David Hammond wrote:
    gastro gnome wrote:But, the star of the show were the hot sugared and cinnamoned pecans.


    From the Sweet Swabian, I assume?


    I believe so. I didn't catch the name and hadn't yet received the subcompact digital camera that will heretofore live in my pocket.

    The description on their only somewhat difficult to read website seems like a match for what I ate.
  • Post #111 - December 13th, 2007, 7:49 pm
    Post #111 - December 13th, 2007, 7:49 pm Post #111 - December 13th, 2007, 7:49 pm
    gastro gnome wrote:The description on their only somewhat difficult to read website


    Good lord, that is textbook terrible. It actually hurts to read!
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #112 - December 15th, 2007, 12:59 pm
    Post #112 - December 15th, 2007, 12:59 pm Post #112 - December 15th, 2007, 12:59 pm
    I had the Liver Dumpling soup from Maders, and found it delicate, tasty, and very warming. By far my favorite item I've had there.
  • Post #113 - December 16th, 2007, 11:00 am
    Post #113 - December 16th, 2007, 11:00 am Post #113 - December 16th, 2007, 11:00 am
    David Hammond wrote:
    Karl wrote:
    should have had a beer, though I liked the gluvien just fine. Easy to please. I guess.


    I was at Laschett's the other afternoon and had a glass of Gluhwein - I'm assuming that's what you're talking about, David? I wonder if it's the same thing. It's good, although it's no glogg.


    Karl,

    You're probably right; I was going from memory, and it's likely spelled "gluhwein" (glow wine?).

    I mentioned gloog to a German woman I was sitting with, comparing it with gluhwein. "No," she sniffed, "Gluhwein is nothing like glogg, which has all kinds of cinnamon and raisins in it."

    Incidentally, I'm told gluhwein is available at Aldi, which is apparently a German store (I did not know that).

    Hammond


    They also sell the same gluhwein served at the downtown Christkindlmarkt at Binny's on Grand for $7.99 for a 1 liter bottle. We bought the last bottle they had last night, they said they'd be restocking it on Wednesday. It's called "Nurnberger Markt Gluhwein." 10% ABV. We like to add a shot of brandy to each glass after heating the gluhwein.
    ...Pedro
  • Post #114 - December 19th, 2007, 3:56 pm
    Post #114 - December 19th, 2007, 3:56 pm Post #114 - December 19th, 2007, 3:56 pm
    My Christkindlmarket segment will air tomorrow (12/20) on both the 9:00 AM and 8:00 PM broadcasts of Chicago Public Radio's 848, on WBEZ, 91.5 FM -- you can listen here:

    http://www.chicagopublicradio.org/program_848.aspx

    After the last show, the segment will be available online as a podcast.
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #115 - December 20th, 2007, 5:27 pm
    Post #115 - December 20th, 2007, 5:27 pm Post #115 - December 20th, 2007, 5:27 pm
    I made a stop at the Christkindlmarket today and tried a reuben egg roll at Maders. I was very pleasantly surprised at how good this was. Two egg rolls were served with a small cup of somewhat spicy mustard for dipping. I wish these were available somewhere year around. They are a great little snack!
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #116 - December 21st, 2007, 12:46 am
    Post #116 - December 21st, 2007, 12:46 am Post #116 - December 21st, 2007, 12:46 am
    stevez wrote:I made a stop at the Christkindlmarket today and tried a reuben egg roll at Maders. I was very pleasantly surprised at how good this was. Two egg rolls were served with a small cup of somewhat spicy mustard for dipping. I wish these were available somewhere year around.

    I think I remember seeing something similar on the specials board at Laschet's. I don't remember what it was called but the explanation sounded pretty much like a reuben egg roll. I didn't consider ordering them for a second, with Hackepeter available.

    While looking something up before posting, I found that reuben rolls aren't unknown in Chicago. For reuben rolls on the regular menu, try Schoolyard Tavern, Gaslight Bar, Brownstone Tavern, Sidebar Grille, Kirkwood Bar or West End. All these places are owned by the same group and have similar menus. I haven't been to any of these places and that's not likely to change in the foreseeable future.

    If you want to avoid the clonebars, you can get reuben rolls at Paddy Mac's on Pulaski near Irving.
  • Post #117 - December 21st, 2007, 12:53 am
    Post #117 - December 21st, 2007, 12:53 am Post #117 - December 21st, 2007, 12:53 am
    Rene G wrote:
    stevez wrote:I made a stop at the Christkindlmarket today and tried a reuben egg roll at Maders. I was very pleasantly surprised at how good this was. Two egg rolls were served with a small cup of somewhat spicy mustard for dipping. I wish these were available somewhere year around.

    I think I remember seeing something similar on the specials board at Laschet's. I don't remember what it was called but the explanation sounded pretty much like a reuben egg roll. I didn't consider ordering them for a second, with Hackepeter available.

    While looking something up before posting, I found that reuben rolls aren't unknown in Chicago. For reuben rolls on the regular menu, try Schoolyard Tavern, Gaslight Bar, Brownstone Tavern, Sidebar Grille, Kirkwood Bar or West End. All these places are owned by the same group and have similar menus. I haven't been to any of these places and that's not likely to change in the foreseeable future.

    If you want to avoid the clonebars, you can get reuben rolls at Paddy Mac's on Pulaski near Irving.


    Funny. I spoke to the Mader's man at the market and he told me, and I quote, "We were actually experimenting in our kitchen one day, and Reuben sandwiches are a popular item... We…have Reuben rolls, which are kind of an offshoot of the Reuben sandwich; it’s corned beef, Swiss cheese and onion in a won-ton wrap... "

    My impression, based on this exchange, was that Mader's invented this food item, though I'm not claiming that is the case. :roll:
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #118 - December 21st, 2007, 5:12 am
    Post #118 - December 21st, 2007, 5:12 am Post #118 - December 21st, 2007, 5:12 am
    David Hammond wrote:Funny. I spoke to the Mader's man at the market and he told me, and I quote, "We were actually experimenting in our kitchen one day, and Reuben sandwiches are a popular item... We…have Reuben rolls, which are kind of an offshoot of the Reuben sandwich; it’s corned beef, Swiss cheese and onion in a won-ton wrap... "

    My impression, based on this exchange, was that Mader's invented this food item, though I'm not claiming that is the case. :roll:

    That's my understanding too, that Mader's in Milwaukee popularized (and possibly invented) the reuben roll. Here's something I found that puts a date on that momentous occasion.

    Denise Taylor wrote:"In the late ’80s, our chef [Dennis Wegner] was just putzing around in our kitchen, and he put one of our Reuben balls in an egg roll wrapper, and that was it," said Mader’s manager, Dan Hazard.

    If that's the case, it's clearly before Schoolyard Tavern etc existed. I don't believe Laschet's has been serving them for very long.
  • Post #119 - December 21st, 2007, 5:37 am
    Post #119 - December 21st, 2007, 5:37 am Post #119 - December 21st, 2007, 5:37 am
    Rene G wrote:While looking something up before posting, I found that reuben rolls aren't unknown in Chicago.

    Moher, a couple of year old Irish bar in Edgebrook, has a surprisingly tasty variation labeled Irish Spring Rolls (Corned beef, cabbage, cheddar cheese and mustard sauce).

    Moher
    5310 W. Devon
    Chicago, IL 60646
    773-467-1825
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #120 - December 21st, 2007, 10:48 am
    Post #120 - December 21st, 2007, 10:48 am Post #120 - December 21st, 2007, 10:48 am
    I've had this Irish corned beef egg roll kind of thing at
    Mickey Finns Brewery in Libertyville.
    They were actually very good.

    And I managed to get my balky computer to play David's NPR piece- very well done and informative- I did get to the market last night and enjoyed a pork loin sandwich and potato pancakes and gluhwein- all very yummy.

    Hoping to maybe sneak in one more visit on Sunday which I think is their last day....
    BTW David my hubby (Frank H. the video and film producer/director) remembers you fondly and speaks highly of you...
    "If you reject the food, ignore the customs, fear the religion and avoid the people, you might better stay home."
    ~James Michener

Contact

About

Team

Advertize

Close

Chat

Articles

Guide

Events

more