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Curry Hut - Highwood, IL [now Himalayan Sherpa]

Curry Hut - Highwood, IL [now Himalayan Sherpa]
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  • Curry Hut - Highwood, IL [now Himalayan Sherpa]

    Post #1 - January 7th, 2005, 8:05 pm
    Post #1 - January 7th, 2005, 8:05 pm Post #1 - January 7th, 2005, 8:05 pm
    Hi,

    My friend Helen and I went to the buffet lunch today of this newly opened restaurant. I was especially keen to go since I recall Zim commenting Indian buffets are always at their best when the restaurant just opened its doors for business. If you wait a few months or a year to try these buffets, they have usually shifted in quality over time and never in a positive direction.

    I must admit I thought $8.95 was a stiff price for an Indian buffet as I am used to the neck-to-neck competitive pricing on Devon Avenue. Alas, I am on Sheridan Road in Highwood less than 10 minutes drive from my house. So I weighed convenience to home opposed to better prices and decided to give it a try.

    Helen and I already discussed in the car, we would check the food visually first before sitting down. I hate getting my glass of water and feeling the need to leave, so I do read menus and look around before sitting down. Everything there looked fresh, appetizing and what really sealed the deal: fresh naan and Tandoori chicken would be brought to the table from the kitchen. When I asked if it could be onion naan instead, they guy said no problem for no extra price. I was willing to pay for onion naan, but that it was included was especially sweet.

    In the salad bar, they had sweet preserved mango, spicy preserved mango, vegetables such as: cucumber slices, grated carrots, lettuce, onions; plus green chili, tamarind and raita (yogurt with tomatoes, cucumbers, carrots and cilantro) sauces. Under a heat lamp were samosas (cut in half), whole pakoras, pappad cracker bread and a tomato-based soup of the day.

    The steam table had Paleek Paneer (spinach cooked with cottage cheese), Chana Masala (chickpeas), Chicken Makhani ("Butter Chicken" in a creamy tomato sauce), Peas Pulav (rice and peas flavored with saffron), Khasi Ko Maasu (Goat meat with bone in a "typical" Nepalese style with herbs and spices) and Zucchini Aloo.

    Dessert: Russgulla (cold, unsweetened coconut in a heavy sugar syrup) and Gulab Jamun (warm, golden fried dumplings of milk pastry soaked in sweet saffron syrup).

    When one of the hosts realized I was taking notes, he brought a take out menu and circled everything present. So if something is missing, well a best effort was made from both sides.

    The Tandoori Chicken arrived noisily sizzling on a bed of slivered onions on a cast-iron plate. The onion naan was glistening with oil fresh from the griddle and smelling fragrant of onion. I didn't grab the onions fast enough from the grill, I was eating the samosas and pakoras waiting for the heat to dim, so my onions were somewhat charred, which added to their appeal. When we finished the chicken, they immediately inquired if we want more.

    The staff was very willing to explain anything and everything about your meal. There were some military people there from Ft Sheridan. The host pulled out a copy of the military paper to show them his ad. The comedian counter postman was there and treated like a prince. Another group of guys showed up for their weekly lunch, and maybe they were there only once before, treated like old friends. I was genuinely pleased by the warmth this staff went out of their way to exude in this new establishment. Hold onto your silverware, they are so anxious to provide good service, they wisk some things away just a tad too fast ... though that beats sitting around a table of dirty plates.

    For my area, it was a nice addition to the mix of restaurants available. This may be the first Indian restaurant in our area I am aware of.

    Curry Hut
    410 Sheridan Avenue
    Highwood, IL 60040
    Tel: 847/432-2889

    Lunch: Mon-Fri: 11:30 AM - 3 PM, Weekends: 12 PM - 3 PM
    Dinner: Sun-Thurs: 4:30 PM - 9:30 PM, Fri & Sat: 4:30 PM - 10 PM
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #2 - January 7th, 2005, 11:37 pm
    Post #2 - January 7th, 2005, 11:37 pm Post #2 - January 7th, 2005, 11:37 pm
    So Himalayan at Golf and Milwaukee doesn't count as your area? Seems north enough to me to be in the Himalayas, but I suppose that's way down south for y'all.

    One more reason to eat Indian food:

    http://my.webmd.com/content/article/99/105083.htm
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  • Post #3 - January 8th, 2005, 10:00 am
    Post #3 - January 8th, 2005, 10:00 am Post #3 - January 8th, 2005, 10:00 am
    Hi,

    I would imagine getting to Golf and Milwaukee is equally (in)convenient from my home as it would be from yours. I would likely get to Old Orchard by expressway then local roads to the destination. For slightly more effort, you may as well go to Touhy, Lincoln and Devon over to Western ... which I did Friday night after 8 PM in about 30 minutes.

    I get the hint: eat more curry ... I took your advice, sort of, and had Pakistani for dinner last night. Yeah, I was pretty surprised myself where I ended up for dinner though the company was excellent and well worth the trip.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #4 - January 8th, 2005, 10:38 am
    Post #4 - January 8th, 2005, 10:38 am Post #4 - January 8th, 2005, 10:38 am
    Thanks for the review of the Curry Hut. Now when I pick up Hogie Hut for the kids I can swing by there.
    There is an Indian restaurant in Buffalo Grove in the mall off of Lake-Cook Rd. and Buffalo Grove Rd. I thinks it's an Indian Garden branch.
  • Post #5 - January 8th, 2005, 4:30 pm
    Post #5 - January 8th, 2005, 4:30 pm Post #5 - January 8th, 2005, 4:30 pm
    Thanks Cathy. I look forward to trying Curry Hut. There is a shortage of good ethnic in the North Shore and this helps a lot.
    Where there’s smoke, there may be salmon.
  • Post #6 - January 9th, 2005, 10:39 am
    Post #6 - January 9th, 2005, 10:39 am Post #6 - January 9th, 2005, 10:39 am
    The only other Indian place that I know about in the area is Peacock in Vernon Hills. I think that Curry Hut is better because the food seems fresher. I hope things pick up there so that it can stay fresh....the good thing about Peacock is that they do a very big lunch business so the food gets turned over. The downside with peacock is that they seem to have a lot of run-ins with the health department.
    I have had the buffet at Curry Hut twice, and it seems like most of the selection stays the same. The only changes from my visits is that the chickpeas replaced a traditional lentil curry, and the zuchinni was not there on my visit.
    Cathy- what was the thing on the salad bar that was salty, spicy and had alot of preserved lemon in it?
    -Will
  • Post #7 - January 9th, 2005, 5:46 pm
    Post #7 - January 9th, 2005, 5:46 pm Post #7 - January 9th, 2005, 5:46 pm
    I've made it to Curry Hut a couple of times and well and thought it was a welcome addition. I hit the buffet at 12:30 and was a bit disappointed that I had to dig through a lot of sauce to get at any meat in the meat dishes. The flavors were nice, though. The deserts were different than the ones listed previously -- a carrot pudding and a rice pudding, neither of which I tried. As when Cathy visited, the proprietor was everywhere, being very helpful, although a lot of his conversations seemed to involve him reassuring people that the food wasn't too spicy.

    I've also tried take out: the chicken chilly masala was a nice curry with a little bit of heat, the lamb vindaloo was quite hot (I hope it stays that way, it seems like even the allegedly spicy food frequently isn't in this neck of the woods), and the mo mo were mildly flavored but nice Nepalese steamed chicken dumplings with a dipping sauce (made of chickpeas, maybe?)

    I liked it quite a bit better than Peacock, where I've had the lunch buffet once and really didn't care for it.
  • Post #8 - January 10th, 2005, 1:11 pm
    Post #8 - January 10th, 2005, 1:11 pm Post #8 - January 10th, 2005, 1:11 pm
    Chilcoat- interesting that you mention the spicyness. I think that it was definitely spicier the first time I went. I am afraid that they may be toning it down for the suburban palate.
    -Will
  • Post #9 - January 10th, 2005, 3:25 pm
    Post #9 - January 10th, 2005, 3:25 pm Post #9 - January 10th, 2005, 3:25 pm
    We ordered lunch from Curry Hut today. Overall, I thought it was very good and I think it compares well with Tiffin, Moti Mahal, etc.

    Some Curry Hut renditions I liked better than at my favorite Devon Avenune spots: green chutney, very spicy vindaloo, palak paneer, dal makhani and navratan korma were excellent at Curry Hut. Other items, while certainly in the ballpark, were not as much to my liking: samosa, raita, chicken makhani, peas pulao.

    Tandoori vegetables at Curry Hut were great but at $11.95 for an order, all I can say is "ouch."

    Based on the wide variation in quality I've experienced on Devon Avenue, I can safely say that Curry Hut is a bona fide option for Indian cuisine on the north shore. Is it as good as Tiffin on its best day? No, but I've been to Tiffin on more than a few "off" days and Curry Hut is certainly better than those meals were. And it's 5 minutes from my office in HP which makes it a very worthy and viable option.

    =R=
    There are many things that are legal that are not a great idea --Nick Shabazz

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #10 - January 10th, 2005, 10:02 pm
    Post #10 - January 10th, 2005, 10:02 pm Post #10 - January 10th, 2005, 10:02 pm
    Cathy- what was the thing on the salad bar that was salty, spicy and had alot of preserved lemon in it?


    When we were there, there was a spicy mango (chutney?) with lots of stuff mixed with it. I didn't taste it, because when I hear spicy, my guard goes up-up-up. When my friend tasted it and said it was too spicy for me, I didn't touch it.

    Oddly later Friday night, I ate at a Pakistani restaurant on Devon, which got my nasal passages flowing. I brought home plenty of leftovers, which pleased my more chili tolerant family. Saturday night I was at Ed's Potsticker, where we had sweet and sour fish filets with chilies. My tongue was on fire, while my other two companions ate away. Every once in a while I believe my tolerance has improved, then I learn I'm wrong. :oops:
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #11 - January 10th, 2005, 11:18 pm
    Post #11 - January 10th, 2005, 11:18 pm Post #11 - January 10th, 2005, 11:18 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:Saturday night I was at Ed's Potsticker, where we had sweet and sour fish filets with chilies. My tongue was on fire, while my other two companions ate away.


    DO NOT let her talk you out of the sweet and sour fish filets with chiles. ;)

    Image

    Regards,
    Erik M.
  • Post #12 - January 11th, 2005, 9:21 am
    Post #12 - January 11th, 2005, 9:21 am Post #12 - January 11th, 2005, 9:21 am
    Cathy2 wrote:
    Cathy- what was the thing on the salad bar that was salty, spicy and had alot of preserved lemon in it?


    When we were there, there was a spicy mango (chutney?) with lots of stuff mixed with it. I didn't taste it, because when I hear spicy, my guard goes up-up-up. When my friend tasted it and said it was too spicy for me, I didn't touch it.


    Sounds like you're referring to achar or pickle, there are many varieties of such, and places will often rotate which one they put out. Mango and lemon are among the most common varieties. Pickle is such a common accompaniment to meals that on indian airlines flights you're served a little plastic wrapped serving alongside your meal. Rusdhie used achar to great effect as symbolizing memory in Midnight's children. I guess what i'm saying is - don't skip the pickle

    Most places are putting out jarred stuff, of which there is an almost bewildering variety at most indian groceries. Some of my favorites are the andhra style gongura and ginger pickles now showing up in the US markets.
  • Post #13 - January 19th, 2005, 1:06 pm
    Post #13 - January 19th, 2005, 1:06 pm Post #13 - January 19th, 2005, 1:06 pm
    We had the buffet this Monday and thought it comparable to many on Devon. Nice room, good food and service.

    Several dishes had subdued heat; it seems likely they've adjusted to local tastes. The Tandoori chicken was quite good; moist and flavorful. Better than I remember having had in Delhi long ago.

    The buffet dishes were as Cathy described, except that one dessert option was kheer (rice pudding) instead of russgulla. I had the gulab jamon which was nice. Wife #1 enjoyed her kheer.

    We look forward to trying it at dinner. Though prices are a bit higher than Devon Avenue, Curry Hut is definitely a worthwhile addition to the north shore.
    Where there’s smoke, there may be salmon.
  • Post #14 - February 2nd, 2008, 12:46 am
    Post #14 - February 2nd, 2008, 12:46 am Post #14 - February 2nd, 2008, 12:46 am
    The Wife and I went to Curry Hut tonight, specifically for Nepalese items, and had the wings, which we also enjoyed at Himalayan Restaurant in Niles. They're pretty simple, just marinated-steamed-grilled, and served sizzling over raw onions.

    Image

    I could have eaten the whole platter (and felt I should have, this being the weekend for such wing-related physical feats), but I needed to save room for more dinner. We held the line, ordering only Nepali items, and I must say, I was sometimes hard-pressed to detect what makes the foods of Nepal that we had tonight different than the foods of India...or China, for that matter. We had the momo (referenced above), which looked a lot like dimsum, but whatever, they were very delicious.

    Image

    We liked the sauce, too.
    "Don't you ever underestimate the power of a female." Bootsy Collins
  • Post #15 - February 2nd, 2008, 12:55 am
    Post #15 - February 2nd, 2008, 12:55 am Post #15 - February 2nd, 2008, 12:55 am
    Those momo look great. I havent had any momo in forever, I used to get it all the time when I went to school in Madison but I haven't been able to find a place that has it, let alone a Nepalese restaurant in the city or near it. Go figure, in Madison they have three Nepalese chow spots on State St. alone.

    Ill be getting there soon to try, thanks for the heads up.
  • Post #16 - February 2nd, 2008, 1:25 am
    Post #16 - February 2nd, 2008, 1:25 am Post #16 - February 2nd, 2008, 1:25 am
    And I forgot to chime in about what actually is Nepalese cuisine as I have had a few discussions on this subject with the owner of Chautara, in Madison, who was from and often returned to Nepal. According to him there was no actual cuisine or flavor that is exclusive to the country, it is basically a bunch of other country's flavor's including mainly Chinese and Indian but also Thai and even Mexican. All that being said they do have thukpa which is a spicy noodle soup served with meat. At the aforementioned Chautara they do it as a special with lamb in winter and its really good with a plate of momo.

    Just in case I ever made it to Nepal I had to ask my guy where to eat there and "where can I get the best momo's?" he told me that there is alot of western based food out there like steak, pizza and fries and that most of the momo vendors "offered garbage, mamas recipe is thee real thing". But he also noted that if I ever did make it there to eat at the Yak and Yeti hotel for food that could compare to his moms recipes.
  • Post #17 - February 2nd, 2008, 1:33 am
    Post #17 - February 2nd, 2008, 1:33 am Post #17 - February 2nd, 2008, 1:33 am
    Da Beef wrote:According to him there was no actual cuisine or flavor that is exclusive to the country, it is basically a bunch of other country's flavor's including mainly Chinese and Indian but also Thai and even Mexican.


    Mexican... :shock:

    He must have meant they include tomatoes and cilantro in their recipes.

    Though Nepal may use spices that are commonly used in the cuisines of other countries, they surely have national dishes. Aloo tama bodi, as I understand, is distinctly Nepali, though it contains black-eye peas and bamboo shoots (which may not even grow in Nepal). Momo would be another example, and I must say, though they looked like dimsum I've had in Chinatown, they tasted different, though I can't quite put my finger on why. Clove? Maybe.
    "Don't you ever underestimate the power of a female." Bootsy Collins
  • Post #18 - February 2nd, 2008, 12:43 pm
    Post #18 - February 2nd, 2008, 12:43 pm Post #18 - February 2nd, 2008, 12:43 pm
    Well I dont know for sure on that Mexican part but I wasnt going to argue with someone who was born in Kathmandu and like I said before returned home often, let alone the fact I knew nothing of the food of Nepal until I went to school in Madison. Youve been? Maybe what he was saying was that there are alot of Chinese, Indian, Thai, Japanese and even Mexican restaurants along the strip there and that Nepalese cuisine is basically there version of many of the dishes that come from other countries. Also I noted above that they have their own national dish's like momo, thukpa, dal bhat and many lamb based recipes and a bunch of other stuff I have yet to indulge in.
  • Post #19 - February 2nd, 2008, 1:30 pm
    Post #19 - February 2nd, 2008, 1:30 pm Post #19 - February 2nd, 2008, 1:30 pm
    Da Beef wrote:Well I dont know for sure on that Mexican part but I wasnt going to argue with someone who was born in Kathmandu and like I said before returned home often, let alone the fact I knew nothing of the food of Nepal until I went to school in Madison. Youve been? Maybe what he was saying was that there are alot of Chinese, Indian, Thai, Japanese and even Mexican restaurants along the strip there and that Nepalese cuisine is basically there version of many of the dishes that come from other countries. Also I noted above that they have their own national dish's like momo, thukpa, dal bhat and many lamb based recipes and a bunch of other stuff I have yet to indulge in.


    Hey da beef, I didn't mean to come off as contentious; I just find it hard to see how Mexican comida figures into the Nepali culinary equation. In this age of fusion, there's no reason why it can't...I'm just not seeing it.
    "Don't you ever underestimate the power of a female." Bootsy Collins
  • Post #20 - December 26th, 2009, 11:51 am
    Post #20 - December 26th, 2009, 11:51 am Post #20 - December 26th, 2009, 11:51 am
    Stopped in here as a slight detour from traditional Christmas Day dining. It was a detour from Casa de Isaac when I realized that it was Christmas and the Sabbath.

    I knew after sitting down and trying the pappadam with the four chutneys that this place wasn't interested in muting its flavors for the suburban or Western palate. There was a green chutney, a spicy/sour dish with green beans, a sweet and spicy (mango?) jam, and a thin sauce which I think was tamarind-based. The green chutney and the spicy/sour (achaar?) were very good.

    We ordered the momo which were one of the few non-fried appetizers and also had Tibetan spicing which I was interested in trying. This dish was served with achaar with a color and consistency of mustard but without a ton of flavor (pickle or otherwise). The flavor of the dish came from the chopped and spiced chicken in side the dumplings. The dumpling dough was a bit tougher than those you'd find at dim sum (I believe the menu said they were made from whole wheat, but they looked just as white as those pictured above) but the whole was a very nice way to start out the meal.

    Mains were lamb khadai and shrimp chili masala which were what we were eying, but the waiter wasn't bashful in recommending them as strongly flavored dishes. At their recommendation we had one order of plain naan, so as not to compete with the other flavors.

    These dishes were served in small chafing dishes set over a sterno-like heat source which kept them warm throughout. I was a bit taken aback by how small these dishes seemed and was worried that we might need more food. I forgot how rich with ghee these sauces likely were as we did not finish.

    I though the spicing on the lamb was excellent, with a rich gravy with tomato and, less-discernably, ginger. I don't know what cut of lamb they used, but it didn't seem like shoulder because it was dry and somewhat tough. Still, the sauce was so good I didn't mind too much. The shrimp were cooked much better and the chili masala delivered spicy, pungent flavor.

    Naan was naan and was good.

    All in all, I was pleasantly surprised by the meal we got and the bold flavor they delivered. If you are in Highwood and looking for Indian (or Nepalese), Curry Hut is no consolation prize.
  • Post #21 - December 26th, 2009, 12:02 pm
    Post #21 - December 26th, 2009, 12:02 pm Post #21 - December 26th, 2009, 12:02 pm
    I don't know why Curry Hut doesn't get lth love since the food is excellent and definitely not dumbed-down for the 'burbs. The piyzi kulcha bread is wonderful, better than any bread we had in India. Prices are not cheap but the quality supports the price. We don't bother going to Devon street anymore since we like Curry Hut so much. I'm always concerned that it's too adventurous for the North Shore but it's hanging in there. Try it!
  • Post #22 - December 26th, 2009, 1:35 pm
    Post #22 - December 26th, 2009, 1:35 pm Post #22 - December 26th, 2009, 1:35 pm
    Just an FYI - you can usually find discount certificates for CH at www.restaurant.com - note it's only valid for Monday-Thursday dining along with a $50 minimum.
    Never order barbecue in a place that also serves quiche - Lewis Grizzard
  • Post #23 - December 26th, 2009, 11:49 pm
    Post #23 - December 26th, 2009, 11:49 pm Post #23 - December 26th, 2009, 11:49 pm
    Marija wrote:I don't know why Curry Hut doesn't get lth love since the food is excellent and definitely not dumbed-down for the 'burbs.

    Nor for the city:
    http://www.curryhutrestaurant.com/

    They've recently opened a South Loop location on Plymouth. And don't fear for the suburban location, as my lady friend informs me that they're kept profitable by a large contingent from Lake Forest College that eats there regularly.
  • Post #24 - February 10th, 2020, 8:42 pm
    Post #24 - February 10th, 2020, 8:42 pm Post #24 - February 10th, 2020, 8:42 pm
    Highwood location has closed. Replaced by Himalayan Sherpa Kitchen. http://himalayansherpakitchenhighwood.com/
    Never order barbecue in a place that also serves quiche - Lewis Grizzard
  • Post #25 - February 11th, 2020, 3:23 pm
    Post #25 - February 11th, 2020, 3:23 pm Post #25 - February 11th, 2020, 3:23 pm
    Dave148 wrote:Highwood location has closed. Replaced by Himalayan Sherpa Kitchen. http://himalayansherpakitchenhighwood.com/

    For whatever it matters, this transition happened a few months ago. Just after Christmas, I saw someone comment about visiting Himalayan Sherpa Kitchen at the same location as Curry Hut. At the time, they still kept Curry Hut and added Himalayan Sherpa. Frankly, I thought this was a move related to search engine optimization and not a change of hands.

    A local article suggested they are keeping the buffet and much the same menu with additions.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #26 - February 11th, 2020, 3:35 pm
    Post #26 - February 11th, 2020, 3:35 pm Post #26 - February 11th, 2020, 3:35 pm
    For more background, check out Sula's piece, which ran back in August of 2019 . . .

    at chicagoreader.com, Mike Sula wrote:For whatever reason, Nepalese food has become a thing this year. To be sure, Chicago has been home to nominally Nepalese restaurants for years. Nepal House, Cumin, Himshikar, Chicago Curry House, and Curry Hut are well established, but their menus often rely heavily on the not insignificant Indian influence on Nepalese cuisine and largely ignore the regional and ethnic differences within Nepal.

    This is true even among the brand-new crop of legitimately exciting Nepalese restaurants, such as Vajra, a fine-dining newcomer that offers interesting takes on a few Nepalese standards (duck chhoila in particular), but still spans the subcontinent with diffusely inspired dishes like Goan fish curry, butter chicken, and tandoori venison. Places like Chiya Chai and the Momo World focus on the country's famous dumplings but don't go much deeper than that.

    Enter Bhim Rai, an eight-year veteran of Highwood's Curry Hut, who along with three partners opened Himalayan Sherpa Kitchen in Lincoln Square with a menu that goes deeper into Nepalese regional and multiethnic foods than anywhere else in town.

    Himalayan Sherpa Kitchen goes deeper into Nepal

    =R=
    There are many things that are legal that are not a great idea --Nick Shabazz

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #27 - February 11th, 2020, 4:44 pm
    Post #27 - February 11th, 2020, 4:44 pm Post #27 - February 11th, 2020, 4:44 pm
    I havent eaten at the new version yet, but I stopped in and talked to someone who said that it is pretty much the same people, but that they were going to concentrate more on the Nepalese angle, which makes sense based on the story about the Lincoln Square location. He said that the lunch buffet would still have all the old favorites (basically the more traditional Indian dishes) while adding some more unusual items too.

    -Will

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