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  • Cho Jung

    Post #1 - September 26th, 2009, 7:08 am
    Post #1 - September 26th, 2009, 7:08 am Post #1 - September 26th, 2009, 7:08 am
    A friend introduced me to Cho Jung yesterday, and I was merely going to post about our meal in the Best Thing You've Eaten {Lately} thread knowing that I cannot do this place justice, but I so strongly believe that's we've been remiss as a community in not giving this place attention and its own thread, here it is.*

    Yesterday, we stopped in for a simple lunch of pajeon (and other panchan) and sundubu. I will qualify my comments by saying that I have very limited knowledge of Korean food and my experience of it is limited essentially to Chicago. However, I do feel like I've sampled Korean food widely in this city, and the food at Cho Jung is by far the best I've had. Our meal at Cho Jung made me realize that I've been eating dismal Korean food this entire time.

    To start, the panchan was excellent (mostly dishes I've had at other restaurants except for a small delightful dish of pickled apple) but freshly prepared and with exceptional care. The pajeon was superb--not limp and greasy like the versions I've had at most other Chicago Korean restaurants. At Cho Jung, the pajeon was somehow both dense with green onion and seafood while retaining an almost pillowy quality which made it a lovely starter.

    I don't live close to Glenview, but I will find my way back by whatever means necessary to have Cho Jung's sundubu jjigae. This dish is going in my top 5 list of comfort food I can get in Chicago. It's served traditionally at Cho Jung--boiling with a raw egg nestled in the middle of the stone bowl--and gorgeous with its rich broth, soft tofu, vegetables and whole shrimp. With colder months ahead of us, I look forward to indulging in this dish again and again.

    I hope others, particularly folks more knowledgeable about Korean food and more articulate than myself, will weigh in on Cho Jung. I've had several excellent meals in the last few weeks, but I can say easily that my lunch there yesterday was the best thing I've eaten lately.

    Cho Jung
    952 Harlem Ave
    Glenview IL 60025-4275
    847-724-1111


    *LAZ has included Cho Jung in the Suburbs are not a Culinary Wasteland index and in the Glenview and Nearby thread, but that seems to be the extent of its presence on LTH. This is utterly baffling to me.
  • Post #2 - September 27th, 2009, 4:10 am
    Post #2 - September 27th, 2009, 4:10 am Post #2 - September 27th, 2009, 4:10 am
    Here are some pics of items I absolutely love at Cho Jung:

    Image

    Image
    Pajeon (Korean pancake).
    If you like pajeon, don't miss this one. Cho Jung's execution is a standard deviation better than the next best in town, being nicely fried and containing lots of tasty seafood and scallion in perfect proportion.

    Image
    Homemade mandu (Korean dumpling).
    Again, wonderfully crisp and containing a subtle yet highly satisfying pork/onion/cabbage filling. The wrappers have a beautiful pliancy, texture, and taste that one usually finds with any well-crafted homemade dough, no matter what the type.

    Image
    Dolsot Bi Bim Bop.
    Only tried this dish once but remember it being highly satisfying in its freshness and simplicity. Just by looking at the perfectly prepared fried egg indicates the care they put into the overall bowl.

    Image
    My go-to order at Cho Jung: Soon dubu jigae accompanied by what I consider some of the best, if not the best, banchan in town. For me, this is the utopian sub-$10 meal (I believe $8.95?).
    Like happy_stomach accurately and lovingly describes above, they are all vibrantly fresh and will elevate this type of non-BBQ based Korean meal (such as Yukaejang, Kalbitang, kimchiguk, soon dubu jigae) beyond your usual Chicago experience.
    As far as the soon dubu jigae, I've had it at least a dozen times over the past year and it is clearly the gold standard in Chicago, with only Chodang Tofu House in Mount Prospect anywhere near close to it. This bowl is chocked full of happy seafood (unlike most lame versions being peddled around town) with boatloads of pillowy tofu, and a subtle yet flavorful seafood-based spicy broth that will keep you engaged to the very last spoonful.

    A Chicago soon dubu jigae roundup post is in the works. I need to get off my lazy ass and finish it.
  • Post #3 - September 27th, 2009, 9:27 am
    Post #3 - September 27th, 2009, 9:27 am Post #3 - September 27th, 2009, 9:27 am
    This is very useful to know. I am in this shopping center all the time as it is close to my house, but I have never dined at Cho Jung, thinking that it must be watered down Asian food. I am glad to know that my assumption is wrong. Glenview does have a significant Korean population in fact, although - I think - not right in that neighborhood.

    Happystomach or Pigmon, if you want to dine at Cho Jung again, let me know: ordering power is useful at Korean restaurants.
    Toast, as every breakfaster knows, isn't really about the quality of the bread or how it's sliced or even the toaster. For man cannot live by toast alone. It's all about the butter. -- Adam Gopnik
  • Post #4 - September 27th, 2009, 9:39 am
    Post #4 - September 27th, 2009, 9:39 am Post #4 - September 27th, 2009, 9:39 am
    PIGMON wrote:My go-to order at Cho Jung: Soon dubu jigae accompanied by what I consider some of the best, if not the best, banchan in town. For me, this is the utopian sub-$10 meal (I believe $8.95?).


    I have had the pleasure of dining with Pigmon at Cho Jung on a couple of occasions. I've got to agree with his assessment of the Soon dubu jigae. Having my first bowl of this soup at Cho Jung was a revelation.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #5 - September 27th, 2009, 10:57 am
    Post #5 - September 27th, 2009, 10:57 am Post #5 - September 27th, 2009, 10:57 am
    GAF wrote: Happystomach or Pigmon, if you want to dine at Cho Jung again, let me know: ordering power is useful at Korean restaurants.


    Ditto from me.
    HS--Thanks for bringing Cho Jung to my attention. I'm always on the lookout for new places to try in this area following dr. appts. in Glenview or at Glenbrook Hospital (which usually involve fasting beforehand--so I'm hungry!). Somehow I have missed Cho Jung up until now, and from GAF's description, I might have continued to miss it. Now it's going on my short list.
    "Life is a combination of magic and pasta." -- Federico Fellini

    "You're not going to like it in Chicago. The wind comes howling in from the lake. And there's practically no opera season at all--and the Lord only knows whether they've ever heard of lobster Newburg." --Charles Foster Kane, Citizen Kane.
  • Post #6 - September 27th, 2009, 11:06 am
    Post #6 - September 27th, 2009, 11:06 am Post #6 - September 27th, 2009, 11:06 am
    Cho Jung is about 15 minutes from Evanston (about 20 from downtown Evanston), so it could be a spot for the Anywhere-but-Evanston-itself Lunch Group.
    Toast, as every breakfaster knows, isn't really about the quality of the bread or how it's sliced or even the toaster. For man cannot live by toast alone. It's all about the butter. -- Adam Gopnik
  • Post #7 - September 27th, 2009, 12:01 pm
    Post #7 - September 27th, 2009, 12:01 pm Post #7 - September 27th, 2009, 12:01 pm
    This is excellent news! I work in that area and frequently have lunch at Viccinos in the same mall. I had no idea this place was even there. I will be trying it very soon.
    I used to think the brain was the most important part of the body. Then I realized who was telling me that.
  • Post #8 - September 27th, 2009, 12:09 pm
    Post #8 - September 27th, 2009, 12:09 pm Post #8 - September 27th, 2009, 12:09 pm
    I've been to Cho Jung several times (thanks, Pigmon) and really enjoy it. Though I'm certainly no expert when it comes to Korean food (which is one reason why I'd held off on posting about it), Cho Jung's soups, pancakes, tofu dishes and panchan are all among my faves. There's a level of refinement and finesse present in the plates at Cho Jung that isn't typical of most Korean places at which I've eaten in Chicagoland. Here are a few images from some of the meals I've enjoyed there . . .

    Image


    Image
    Dolsot Bibimbop


    Image
    Spicy Codfish Soup


    Image
    Seafood Pancake


    Image
    Grilled Tofu


    Image
    Fish Cake


    Image
    Fried / Steamed Dumplings


    Image
    Tofu & Kim Chi with Spicy Pork


    Image
    Spicy Codfish Soup


    Image
    Chicken Ginseng Soup


    Image
    Spicy Squid


    Image
    Zucchini 'Kim Chi'


    Image
    Spicy Pollack Fish Roe Stew


    Image
    Spicy Pollack Fish Roe Stew

    If you haven't been to Cho Jung, you really owe it to yourself to visit and check it out for yourself.

    =R=
    Gardening is a bloodsport --Meghan Kleeman

    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #9 - September 27th, 2009, 12:13 pm
    Post #9 - September 27th, 2009, 12:13 pm Post #9 - September 27th, 2009, 12:13 pm
    I so strongly believe that's we've been remiss as a community in not giving this place attention and its own thread


    Well, gee, maybe the 214 dinners that have evidently been held there without anybody posting about it until you did might have something to do with that! :?
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  • Post #10 - September 27th, 2009, 1:53 pm
    Post #10 - September 27th, 2009, 1:53 pm Post #10 - September 27th, 2009, 1:53 pm
    GAF wrote:I am in this shopping center all the time as it is close to my house, but I have never dined at Cho Jung, thinking that it must be watered down Asian food.

    Understandable, as you aren't Oriental. (((gong)))

    Image photo by Ronnie Suburban

    For what it's worth, Cho Jung came across my radar because of a lone post on Yelp about a year ago from a guy who was raving about their homemade acorn mook and ddukbokki.

    http://www.yelp.com/biz/cho-jung-glenview
  • Post #11 - September 27th, 2009, 2:03 pm
    Post #11 - September 27th, 2009, 2:03 pm Post #11 - September 27th, 2009, 2:03 pm
    HI,

    Amazing all the informaton happy stomach's post caused to erupt.

    What were people waiting for? To keep these restaurants humming they need traffic. I know of one place where there was an honor system not to disclose it until the finder posted on it. Guess what? It closed before that right moment happened.

    Thank you everyone for all this information, I'm glad it finally surfaced.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
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  • Post #12 - September 27th, 2009, 2:11 pm
    Post #12 - September 27th, 2009, 2:11 pm Post #12 - September 27th, 2009, 2:11 pm
    trixie-pea wrote:
    GAF wrote:I am in this shopping center all the time as it is close to my house, but I have never dined at Cho Jung, thinking that it must be watered down Asian food.

    Understandable, as you aren't Oriental. (((gong)))

    LOL . . . so true about the sign. It isn't exactly compelling. I guess you can't judge a book by its cover.

    =R=
    Gardening is a bloodsport --Meghan Kleeman

    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #13 - September 27th, 2009, 5:20 pm
    Post #13 - September 27th, 2009, 5:20 pm Post #13 - September 27th, 2009, 5:20 pm
    All,

    This thread has made my day--thank you to those who've "come out" about their experiences at Cho Jung, both in this thread and/or in PMs and emails to me. The response both in volume and enthusiasm was completely unexpected. I am positively tickled. I must, however, give credit entirely to Sir PIGMON who is also responsible for my first visit to Cho Jung.

    I feel now a happy obligation to organize a meal there. I'll determine a date and how carless ol' me will get back out to Glenview, and then I'll post something on the Events board. Stay tuned.

    Sharon
  • Post #14 - September 30th, 2009, 11:49 am
    Post #14 - September 30th, 2009, 11:49 am Post #14 - September 30th, 2009, 11:49 am
    Just wondering: is it typical for sides (panchan?) to be included when you order food for take-out from a Korean restaurant, or only when you dine in?
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #15 - October 1st, 2009, 5:55 am
    Post #15 - October 1st, 2009, 5:55 am Post #15 - October 1st, 2009, 5:55 am
    Katie wrote:Just wondering: is it typical for sides (panchan?) to be included when you order food for take-out from a Korean restaurant, or only when you dine in?

    I'd guess yes, but it occurs to me I have never, at least that I can remember, taken Korean food to go. I'd also venture including panchan in take out orders varies from restaurant to restaurant.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #16 - October 1st, 2009, 6:38 am
    Post #16 - October 1st, 2009, 6:38 am Post #16 - October 1st, 2009, 6:38 am
    Thanks for posting those wonderful photos of what looks like another undiscovered gem. Sometimes it seems that the best food can be found behind these nondescript storefronts. I am particularly drooling over the photos of bimbop and the soups.
  • Post #17 - October 1st, 2009, 7:09 am
    Post #17 - October 1st, 2009, 7:09 am Post #17 - October 1st, 2009, 7:09 am
    happy_stomach wrote:At Cho Jung, the pajeon was somehow both dense with green onion and seafood while retaining an almost pillowy quality which made it a lovely starter.

    Joining in the chorus line of enthusiasm for Cho Jung. Happy_Stomach accurately describes the pajeon, really a wonderful version, dense, slightly chewy, with a light crisp quality. Panchan is top quality as well, of which I'd venture much is house made.

    Pajeon

    Image

    Included in our panchan mix was a new to me item, soy marinated hard boiled egg. I thought it would be salty, not the case, subtle with a light soyu flavor. Egg was replenished, along with the rest of the panchan. Cho Jung not only has quality panchan, they are generous with servings.

    Hard Boiled Egg Panchan

    Image

    Dried Anchovy ~Attention Cathy2

    Image

    Sundubu was good, but seems less funky/spicy than I've had at Cho Jung. Our waiter said it was due to heat level variation in the peppers used, reasonable, but I am fairly convinced they toned it down for non Asians. Still an amazing bowl of goodness, delicate fluffy tofu, whole shrimp, bits of various types of seafood, all served steaming, make that volcanically, hot.

    Spicy pork was all about the greenery, Korean shiso, Napa cabbage, red leaf, and a couple I was unfamiliar with.

    Accompanying greens in which to wrap Spicy Pork

    Image

    Funny story, Cho Jung includes metal chopsticks and a spoon in their standard place setting, when we sat down our waitress replaced the metal chopsticks with wooden chop sticks and a fork. When I asked why wooden chopsticks for metal, the fork was obvious, she said metal chopsticks are more difficult to use. I kept my metal chopsticks. ;)

    Image

    As we were leaving I could not help but snap a few pictures of our neighbors meal, nice looking rib eye steak on a tableside grill.

    Image

    In addition to top quality and reasonable pricing portions are generous. Three of split two dinners along with (seafood pancake) and fried dumplings which proved, along with panchan, rice and included soy bean paste soup, to be more than we were able to finish.

    I recommend a visit to Cho Jung sooner rather than later.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #18 - October 1st, 2009, 8:01 am
    Post #18 - October 1st, 2009, 8:01 am Post #18 - October 1st, 2009, 8:01 am
    G Wiv wrote:Dried Anchovy ~Attention Cathy2

    Image

    I recommend a visit to Cho Jung sooner rather than later.

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    Will do! It will be great to get the little dead fishies without a special request and too often declined.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
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  • Post #19 - October 1st, 2009, 8:46 am
    Post #19 - October 1st, 2009, 8:46 am Post #19 - October 1st, 2009, 8:46 am
    G Wiv wrote:Sundubu was good, but seems less funky/spicy than I've had at Cho Jung. Our waiter said it was due to heat level variation in the peppers used, reasonable, but I am fairly convinced they toned it down for non Asians.


    My frame of reference is only one visit, but I thought too that the one improvement I'd make to the sundubu would be to increase the spice level. PIGMON asked our waitress if she could bring us chilis, and that she did. She brought out what I think was gochugaru, of which I added a few pinches to my soup. Granted, I think I have a higher heat tolerance than the average person, but the gochugaru seemed to increase the spice level little (I know this stuff is less spicy than common crushed red pepper, but I was still surprised by how little effect it had). I stopped at a few pinches since I didn't want to get carried away seasoning the sundubu if it wasn't going to change the taste or only add a sweet tinge.

    G Wiv wrote:Funny story, Cho Jung includes metal chopsticks and a spoon in their standard place setting, when we sat down our waitress replaced the metal chopsticks with wooden chop sticks and a fork. When I asked why wooden chopsticks for metal, the fork was obvious, she said metal chopsticks are more difficult to use. I kept my metal chopsticks. ;)


    That is funny indeed. I noted the metal chopsticks, which were part of my place setting, and I'm pretty certain that PIGMON had wooden chopsticks, though I hadn't noticed a switching-out when we sat down. I'd used metal chopsticks maybe once in my life before. They don't seem any more difficult to use than wooden ones, and my overall chopstick skills are proficient at best (like my rice-cooking ability...my culinary "disgrasian-ness" is a topic for another thread though).
  • Post #20 - October 1st, 2009, 3:49 pm
    Post #20 - October 1st, 2009, 3:49 pm Post #20 - October 1st, 2009, 3:49 pm
    Went for lunch today, had the Bi Bim Bap lunch special for 8.95 which came with a bowl of miso soup. Simple, hearty, comforting and tasty. I was the only one in there. I really hope things go well for this place.
  • Post #21 - October 1st, 2009, 4:32 pm
    Post #21 - October 1st, 2009, 4:32 pm Post #21 - October 1st, 2009, 4:32 pm
    happy_stomach wrote:I feel now a happy obligation to organize a meal there.


    See the Events board. :D
  • Post #22 - October 5th, 2009, 1:50 pm
    Post #22 - October 5th, 2009, 1:50 pm Post #22 - October 5th, 2009, 1:50 pm
    Because of the great response this restaurant has gotten, we decided to take my 81-year old Korean grandmother there for her birthday Saturday night (on Chuseok, the Korean Harvest Thanksgiving).

    Panchan was plentiful and the waiter there was very accommodating of my non-Korean vegetarian husband (he ordered dolsot bibimbap). Grandma got ginseng chicken soup, sam gye tang (not as good as Ssyal's, but was comforting on a cold night), I ordered spicy shredded beef soup, yook gae jang, mom got a mackerel (godungoh) and kimchi stew prepared tableside and dad got spicy codfish stew, daegu maeun tang. We really liked the mackerel stew, I hope someone gets it next Tuesday night at the LTH dinner! Out of the panchan, my husband really liked the doraji (root of the bellflower), which I guess is being harvested at this time. My father apparently dug up a bunch of roots that afternoon before we arrived.

    The one waiter who was there that evening was very friendly and kept refilling our water glasses with homemade Solomon's Seal tea, also known as dunggulae (둥굴레). It has a nice roasted flavor, very much like the barley or corn tea that one usually gets at Korean restaurants. The waiter is also very fluent in English, so there will be no problems with communication next week.

    I'm really sad I can't make the dinner, but we've moved downstate recently (to Normal) and am dreadfully far away from any Korean food, so my poor husband has been my Korean food guinea pig. I've gotten pretty good at making Korean vegetarian food! It might not be very authentic, but it's pretty close.

    Enjoy next week's dinner and I'm looking forward to reports!


    Sharona
  • Post #23 - April 20th, 2011, 10:31 pm
    Post #23 - April 20th, 2011, 10:31 pm Post #23 - April 20th, 2011, 10:31 pm
    We had dinner at Cho Jung in Glenview and found my new favorite Korean soup, Gamchatang, pork neckbone soup. It is a hearty, long simmered broth, spicy and rich, with potatoes and scallions, some perilla seeds and red pepper flakes, comes to the table still boiling. I have since tried it at SSGS not as good, and at Super H (2nd stand from left) the other day was pretty good. This would be perfect to order on a cheap night with some friends, and a botttle of soju.

    Oh, and just for info, "muk", that waffle cut tofu looking banchan, yes it is tasteless. It is essentially homemade tofu, water and a bean powder, wife made it for daughter as a toddler. The brown version uses powdered acorns, minus the shell, but with the skin. It is enjoyed for it's unusual texture, and as such a complimentary contrast in flavor and bite.
  • Post #24 - December 29th, 2011, 5:15 pm
    Post #24 - December 29th, 2011, 5:15 pm Post #24 - December 29th, 2011, 5:15 pm
    I had a great lunch today at Cho Jung with the LTH North Lunch Group. Besides the great panchan, the highlight for me (as is usually the case) was the Soon Dubu Jigae served bubbling hot.

    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #25 - January 2nd, 2012, 3:09 pm
    Post #25 - January 2nd, 2012, 3:09 pm Post #25 - January 2nd, 2012, 3:09 pm
    stevez wrote:I had a great lunch today at Cho Jung with the LTH North Lunch Group. Besides the great panchan, the highlight for me (as is usually the case) was the Soon Dubu Jigae served bubbling hot.

    Nice video, Steve. Good thing you didn't drop your phone in that bowl! :D

    I really enjoyed the lunch and here's a photo recap of some of what we ate that day . . .

    Image
    Assortment of Panchan


    Image
    Cucumber


    Image
    Sprouts


    Image
    Chayote Squash & Onion
    Definitely my favorite of the bunch and one I don't remember having before at Cho Jung.


    Image
    Mushroom & Eggplant


    Image
    Greens


    Image
    Summer Squash


    Image
    Fried Mandu


    Image
    Seafood Pajeon
    Just fantastic. Crispy, light and filled with some great bits of seafood. I loved the char on the scallions, which provided a great, additional flavor dimension.


    Image
    Kimchi Pajeon
    Very nice with potent kimchi applied judiciously. I still like the seafood version better but this was very tasty, too.


    Image
    Short Rib Soup
    This was ordered by a couple of my neighbors. I didn't taste it, so I can't comment on how it was.


    Image
    Soondubu
    Bursting with rich, deep flavor and quite spicy. This bowl, packed with many treasures of the sea, never fails to satisfy me. I always forget to ask for the raw egg on the side but I was very pleased to see that it had been added last minute, as the yolk was still completely runny. Mixed into the broth, it provided additional depth and body that took it to a whole other level.


    Image
    Soondubu
    Just looking at this makes me want to head over there for a bowl right now! :)

    What I love about Cho Jung is that because of what they specialize in, you can dine there solo and still enjoy the best of what they have to offer. Some panchan and a bowl of soondubu or pollack roe soup is a fantastic lunch. And if you bring a friend or 2, you can enjoy a few other tasty offerings, as well.

    =R=
    Gardening is a bloodsport --Meghan Kleeman

    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #26 - January 2nd, 2012, 3:24 pm
    Post #26 - January 2nd, 2012, 3:24 pm Post #26 - January 2nd, 2012, 3:24 pm
    I was one of the neighbors that ordered the short rib soup. It was good - but it didn't have a wow factor. Next time it's Soondubu for me.
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #27 - January 2nd, 2012, 3:26 pm
    Post #27 - January 2nd, 2012, 3:26 pm Post #27 - January 2nd, 2012, 3:26 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    Nice video, Steve. Good thing you didn't drop your phone in that bowl! :D


    Thanks. It was an homage to Andy Warhol. :wink: Your new setup makes beautiful pictures! Some of those Panchan shots are spectacular.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #28 - January 2nd, 2012, 3:30 pm
    Post #28 - January 2nd, 2012, 3:30 pm Post #28 - January 2nd, 2012, 3:30 pm
    Steve,

    Do you have a video demonstrating the piercing of the pollack roe? That would be very interesting.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #29 - January 2nd, 2012, 3:40 pm
    Post #29 - January 2nd, 2012, 3:40 pm Post #29 - January 2nd, 2012, 3:40 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:Steve,

    Do you have a video demonstrating the piercing of the pollack roe? That would be very interesting.

    Regards,


    No. I just shot that one on a lark when I realized that my phone has a HD video camera in it.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #30 - January 2nd, 2012, 4:34 pm
    Post #30 - January 2nd, 2012, 4:34 pm Post #30 - January 2nd, 2012, 4:34 pm
    stevez wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    Nice video, Steve. Good thing you didn't drop your phone in that bowl! :D


    Thanks. It was an homage to Andy Warhol. :wink: Your new setup makes beautiful pictures! Some of those Panchan shots are spectacular.

    Thanks. I do love the new setup (Canon 5D Mark II, 24-105 mm, f4, L series lens) but honestly, it's far too much camera for my skill level. I'm going to keep shooting as much as possible and hopefully, tame the beast! :D Since our lunch, I have figured out how to shoot video, so I hope to be posting some moving images soon.

    =R=
    Gardening is a bloodsport --Meghan Kleeman

    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain

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